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Cutting down Speer Hammock

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  • hikingdude2003 <jp295301@ohio.edu>
    I ve been playing with some cheap fabric (Supplex-like) in making a prototype Speer Hammock. Right now it s 5 wide. I d like to cut this down to either 4
    Message 1 of 12 , Mar 3, 2003
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      I've been playing with some cheap fabric (Supplex-like) in making a prototype
      Speer Hammock. Right now it's 5' wide. I'd like to cut this down to either 4'
      wide or to an elongated triangle, 5' wide in the middle and 3.5' wide on the
      ends. Any opinions as to which is better/more comfortable. I'm 6'2" and the
      fabric is 10.5 feet long.

      Thanks,

      _john
    • David Chinell
      John: I use the Tropical Hammock manufactured by Nomad Travel. This is a simple, rectangular piece of cloth with a drawstring in either end. When laid out flat
      Message 2 of 12 , Mar 3, 2003
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        John:

        I use the Tropical Hammock manufactured by Nomad Travel.
        This is a simple, rectangular piece of cloth with a
        drawstring in either end. When laid out flat the body is 7
        feet 10 inches long by 3 feet 6 inches wide.

        I'm 5 feet 8 inches tall, and around 200 lbs (on a low-grav
        day). This width seems just the tiniest bit shallow to me.
        I've often thought about making a Speer hammock that was 4
        feet wide, to see how that would feel.

        I'm afraid you'll have to do the R&D on this one yourself,
        but I wanted to let you know that 3-1/2 feet wide would be
        workable.

        Bear
      • hikingdude2003 <jp295301@ohio.edu>
        Bear, Thanks for the heads up. I m probably just going to make 2 different hammocks with the $1/yd fabric and go from there. The 5 width just seems a bit
        Message 3 of 12 , Mar 3, 2003
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          Bear,

          Thanks for the heads up. I'm probably just going to make 2 different
          hammocks with the $1/yd fabric and go from there. The 5' width just
          seems a bit sloppy for me, not to mention I can lighten things up a
          few ounces for the hammock itself.

          -John
        • Ed Speer
          John, I ve considered this myself, but haven t tried it. My sewer informes me that doing anything less than a perfect rectangle will require that the bug net
          Message 4 of 12 , Mar 6, 2003
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            John, I've considered this myself, but haven't tried it. My sewer informes me that doing anything less than a perfect rectangle will require that the bug net also be cut differently to accomodate the new hammock shape--but that may not be too difficult.  I'm anxious to hear how it works for you...Ed
             
            I've been playing with some cheap fabric (Supplex-like) in making a prototype
            Speer Hammock.  Right now it's 5' wide.  I'd like to cut this down to either 4'
            wide or to an elongated triangle, 5' wide in the middle and 3.5' wide on the
            ends.  Any opinions as to which is better/more comfortable.  I'm 6'2" and the
            fabric is 10.5 feet long.

            Thanks,

            _john
          • Ed Speer
            John/Bear Making my hammock 4 wide instead of 5 works fine. Obviously one will not be as deep (read safely) inside the hammock. While the loss of security
            Message 5 of 12 , Mar 6, 2003
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              Message
              John/Bear  Making my hammock 4' wide instead of 5' works fine. Obviously one will not be as deep (read safely) inside the hammock.  While the loss of security is noticable, one can adjust to it.  The biggest advantage of course is a bit less weight....Ed
               
              John:

              I use the Tropical Hammock manufactured by Nomad Travel.
              This is a simple, rectangular piece of cloth with a
              drawstring in either end. When laid out flat the body is 7
              feet 10 inches long by 3 feet 6 inches wide.

              I'm 5 feet 8 inches tall, and around 200 lbs (on a low-grav
              day). This width seems just the tiniest bit shallow to me.
              I've often thought about making a Speer hammock that was 4
              feet wide, to see how that would feel.

              I'm afraid you'll have to do the R&D on this one yourself,
              but I wanted to let you know that 3-1/2 feet wide would be
              workable.

              Bear



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            • geoflyfisher
              Ed Speer wrote: My sewer ... new ... Hi Ed, I did not cut a rectangular bug net for the two Speer type hammocks I have made. The alternate method I used was
              Message 6 of 12 , Mar 6, 2003
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                "Ed Speer" wrote:
                My sewer
                > informes me that doing anything less than a perfect rectangle will
                > require that the bug net also be cut differently to accomodate the
                new
                > hammock shape--but that may not be too difficult.

                Hi Ed,

                I did not cut a rectangular bug net for the two Speer type hammocks I
                have made. The alternate method I used was to hang the hammock with
                a net suspension cord as you describe in the book. Then I put a pad
                in the hammock to put it into the right shape... about the same as
                if I were sleeping in it.

                At this stage, I drape the bug net material over the cord and hold it
                in place with three clothes pins. Then I cut the bug net out in a
                football shape that overlaps the edges of the hammock by about 4-6
                inches. I found it works best to then put the piece on the kitchen
                floor and make a few judicious smoothing cuts to make the shape a
                symetrical and smooth football. Finally, I sew the hook velcro to
                the two long edges of the net. At each of the ends, for the last 6-8
                inches (beyond the velcro line on the hammock, I sew hook velcro to
                one side and pile velcro to the other, so I can close the ends of the
                bug net on itself.

                This seems to use a bit less material, thus a little less weight, and
                also makes the ends of the bug net look a little neater during use. I
                ordered 2.5 yards of noseeum, and layed the material across its
                diagonal before cutting.

                I use some of the cut off bug net to make a little triangular holder
                for glasses and pocket stuff.

                Rick <><
              • Ed Speer
                Neat Rick It is those curved edges my sewer wants to avoid, but I m trying to persuade her it can be done--this helps, thanks...Ed ... From: geoflyfisher
                Message 7 of 12 , Mar 6, 2003
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                  Message
                  Neat Rick  It is those curved edges my sewer wants to avoid, but I'm trying to persuade her it can be done--this helps, thanks...Ed
                   
                  -----Original Message-----
                  From: geoflyfisher [mailto:geoflyfisher@...]
                  Sent: Thursday, March 06, 2003 10:23 AM
                  To: hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com
                  Subject: Hammock Camping Alternate for cutting a Speer Hammock bug net

                  "Ed Speer" wrote:
                  My sewer
                  > informes me that doing anything less than a perfect rectangle will
                  > require that the bug net also be cut differently to accomodate the
                  new
                  > hammock shape--but that may not be too difficult. 

                  Hi Ed,

                  I did not cut a rectangular bug net for the two Speer type hammocks I
                  have made.  The alternate method I used was to hang the hammock with
                  a net suspension cord as you describe in the book.  Then I put a pad
                  in  the hammock to put it into the right shape... about the same as
                  if I were sleeping in it.

                  At this stage, I drape the bug net material over the cord and hold it
                  in place with three clothes pins.  Then I cut the bug net out in a
                  football shape that overlaps the edges of the hammock by about 4-6
                  inches.  I found it works best to then put the piece on the kitchen
                  floor and make a few judicious smoothing cuts to make the shape a
                  symetrical and smooth football.  Finally, I sew the hook velcro to
                  the two long edges of the net.  At each of the ends, for the last 6-8
                  inches (beyond the velcro line on the hammock, I sew hook velcro to
                  one side and pile velcro to the other, so I can close the ends of the
                  bug net on itself. 

                  This seems to use a bit less material, thus a little less weight, and
                  also makes the ends of the bug net look a little neater during use. I
                  ordered 2.5 yards of noseeum, and layed the material across its 
                  diagonal before cutting.  

                  I use some of the cut off bug net to make a little triangular holder
                  for glasses and pocket stuff.

                  Rick
                • geoflyfisher
                  It is those curved edges my sewer wants to avoid, but I m ... Ed, It seems to work out best to cut the velcro the right length, and start sewing at one end.
                  Message 8 of 12 , Mar 6, 2003
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                    It is those curved edges my sewer wants to avoid, but I'm
                    > trying to persuade her it can be done--this helps, thanks...Ed
                    >
                    >
                    Ed,

                    It seems to work out best to cut the velcro the right length, and
                    start sewing at one end. It is very easy to sew next to the edge of
                    the netting a couple inches at a time, simply by holding the netting
                    with one's hand. No pins are necessary. Second line of stitching on
                    the other side of the velcro goes very quickly.

                    I do find that sewing the hook velcro is rough on the thread and that
                    it breaks an average of once per 8 foot side (I think the hooks grab
                    part of the thread and then the thread coating begins to unravel
                    above the sewing machine needle.

                    I like to leave about a quarter inch of netting beyond the velcro so
                    there is a ready to use tab to pull the velcro joint apart. Try one,
                    y'all may like it.

                    <><
                  • hikingdude2003
                    Ed, I ended up cutting the hammock down to 48 and it seems to work well. I m probably going to make another on with the elongated triangle cut and compare.
                    Message 9 of 12 , Mar 6, 2003
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                      Ed,

                      I ended up cutting the hammock down to 48" and it seems to work
                      well. I'm probably going to make another on with the elongated
                      triangle cut and compare. Either way I may sew on tie outs to the
                      sides to spread things out a bit.

                      Great book, BTW.

                      Oh yeah, I see you are in the hills of NC. I lived in Clyde a
                      couple of years ago (I'm from the great town of Climax, NC) and look
                      forward to moving back to the area after grad school. Southeastern
                      Ohio doesn't hold a candle to western NC.
                    • Ed Speer
                      Glad you liked the book Hiking Dude. Also glad to see you making hammocks based on it. Let me know how your modified ones work out. I, too, like western NC a
                      Message 10 of 12 , Mar 6, 2003
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                        Message
                        Glad you liked the book Hiking Dude.  Also glad to see you making hammocks based on it.  Let me know how your modified ones work out.
                         
                        I, too, like western NC a lot.  I've lived all over the US and numerous places overseas, but find the mountains of western NC well suited to me.  I'm only an hour or two from some of the best camping and hiking in the world.  When things get hectic around here, I just head out on the Old Mt. Mitchell trail and soon all is right with the world again. I can't get enought of it and try to spend 4-10 days a month on a trail--and I still haven't hiked half of the ones around here yet!
                         
                        Hiking the AT twice sure made me appreciate this part of the world also.  And it was on those hikes that I decided to write the book on hammock camping--kind of a natural extension of how I spend my life anyway.  I hope to do the PCT next year, with my hammock of course...Ed
                         
                         
                        From: hikingdude2003 [mailto:jp295301@...]
                        Sent: Thursday, March 06, 2003 2:39 PM
                        To: hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com
                        Subject: Re: Hammock Camping Cutting down Speer Hammock

                        Ed,

                        I ended up cutting the hammock down to 48" and it seems to work
                        well.  I'm probably going to make another on with the elongated
                        triangle cut and compare.  Either way I may sew on tie outs to the
                        sides to spread things out a bit. 

                        Great book, BTW.

                        Oh yeah, I see you are in the hills of NC.  I lived in Clyde a
                        couple of years ago (I'm from the great town of Climax, NC) and look
                        forward to moving back to the area after grad school.  Southeastern
                        Ohio doesn't hold a candle to western NC.



                      • hikingdude2003
                        Ed, I thruhiked in 2,000 and completely relate. One perk of my grad assistantship is taking folks out on trips on a regular basis. not as relaxing but a bad
                        Message 11 of 12 , Mar 6, 2003
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                          Ed,

                          I thruhiked in 2,000 and completely relate. One perk of my grad
                          assistantship is taking folks out on trips on a regular basis. not
                          as relaxing but a bad day's hiking beats a good day a work.

                          I'm looking at Clemson for my PhD program. Will probably go visit
                          the campus in the next few months.

                          BTW - i'm doing my thesis on motivations for long distance hikers.
                          Would you be interested in being interviewed (should take 20 minutes
                          or so).

                          Take care,
                          -John
                        • Ed Speer
                          I was on the trail also in 2000--trail name is Not To Worry. I started on Springer Mar 14, but ended at Dragon s Tooth with a broken ankle. IT was hard to
                          Message 12 of 12 , Mar 6, 2003
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                            Message
                            I was on the trail also in 2000--trail name is Not To Worry.  I started on Springer Mar 14, but ended at Dragon's Tooth with a broken ankle.  IT was hard to leave the trail, especialy since I'd been bumped off after 1,000 miles in 99 with family emergency.  But in 2001, I completed the trail one and a half times--yep that was 3,300 miles in 7 months!  Third time was a charm!  I'd be glad to do your interview--any time...Ed
                            BTW - i'm doing my thesis on motivations for long distance hikers. 
                            Would you be interested in being interviewed (should take 20 minutes
                            or so).

                            Take care,
                            -John
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