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Re: hammocking and chiropractic

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  • Eric Sandberg
    I know this thread has been dormant for some time but I figured I d get my 2 cents in (or rather my friend s 2 cents). When I first read the thread I wrote an
    Message 1 of 1 , Dec 22, 2004
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      I know this thread has been dormant for some time but I figured I'd
      get my 2 cents in (or rather my friend's 2 cents). When I first
      read the thread I wrote an email to my best bud who is a
      chiropractor. It took a while for us to connect, but below is
      posted what he said. Pretty interesting and backs up what others
      have been saying.

      "theoretically speaking, a hammock would be terrible for your back.
      Because of the convexity or concavity it puts you in, depending on
      how you sleep, it could shorten the back muscles, cause a plastic
      deformity of a weakened disc or cause the muscles along the spine to
      tighten on one side and elongate on the other if you are on your
      side. I recall our conversation about hammock sleeping. I believe
      you said that you sleep diagonally which creates a level surface,
      right? In that case, it shouldn't pose much of a risk as far as
      putting you in a stressful posture for your back. One question I
      have is how easy is it to move around and change positions in a
      hammock? That is kind of important. You shouldn't be locked into a
      particular position for the entire night. Having said all that, I
      think this is one exception where " if it feels good, do it" works.
      The proof is in how you feel when you get up. If your anatomy
      doesn't get out of sorts and talk to you in the morning when you get
      up, then whatever you're doing is working for you. The national
      sleep council used to say that everyone needs a firm mattress. Now
      they have pillow top mattresses. I wouldn't tell someone who feels
      better sleeping in a hammock to sleep on the ground if they clearly
      feel better in a hammock. Many authorities say no one should sleep
      in the old style waterbeds. Again ,theoretically, they shouldn't;
      however, I have some patients who feel fine when they wake up and
      cannot sleep in anything else. For them it works. I hope that is
      somewhat helpful."

      Words from someone who knows.
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