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Re: How thick

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  • JackWMyers
    Thomas, All of those are probably too little. Our Jacks R Better Nest under quilts are made to have 1.5 inches of loft. We ve had mixed reports on their
    Message 1 of 9 , Dec 7, 2004
      Thomas,

      All of those are probably too little. Our Jacks R Better Nest under
      quilts are made to have 1.5 inches of loft. We've had mixed reports
      on their effectiveness in near freezing temperatures. I've
      personally used them in the low 40s and been quite comfortable. Two
      (2) inches of loft/thickness is probably a safe bet to insure
      comfort near freezing.

      Regards,

      Jack Myers aka Smee

      --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, "Thomas Vickers"
      <redroach@e...> wrote:
      > I am getting material together to have a go at the Kelly Wise
      pattern and I
      > have a question.
      >
      > I don't want to use a pad in the hammock. For me, that would kill
      a lot of
      > the comfort and fun of it.
      >
      > So....
      > In order to stay warm in 35 + Degrees F, how thick of a synthetic
      insulation
      > should I try in the underpad?
      >
      > I won't try down on my first sewing attempt, so it is not an
      option.
      >
      > 1/2 inch?
      > 3/4 inch?
      > 1 inch ?
      >
      > Any of these too much? too little?
      >
      > TV
    • Eric Sandberg
      My experience with under the hammock insulation is that I use the same thickness (loft) that I do for the quilt. So looking at the commercial sleeping bags
      Message 2 of 9 , Dec 7, 2004
        My experience with under the hammock insulation is that I use the
        same thickness (loft) that I do for the quilt. So looking at the
        commercial sleeping bags the ratings seem to be about: 1.5 inches
        for a 40 degree quilt or under quilt (equals 3 inches loft in a
        sleeping bag), 2 inches for 30 degrees, 2.5 inches for 20 degrees,
        3.25 inches for 10 degrees, and 4 inches for 0 degrees.

        I put 2.25 inches under my recent hammock and have been down to 25
        degrees so far with no travel shelter, pad, or tarp (it was a clear
        beautiful night). I was in a bathing suit shorts, light bergalene
        top, fleece socks, knit hat - and I was too hot. Had to take off
        the socks and put on a lighter hat. I'm making a travelshelter now
        and expect to get to at least 0 with it (I live in New England).
        One disclaimer - I don't use an underquilt. I think sewing the
        insulation right to the bottom of the hammock is much warmer (See
        Rick's WarmHammock or the insulated hammock on "The lightweight
        Backpacker" website).

        My insulated hammock, tarp/poncho, and sleeping quilt weight 3 lbs,
        1 oz including the stakes and lines - way less than the lightest
        tent, bag, and pad setup I could find, and more comfortable to boot.

        Enjoy the woods,
        Eric

        --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, "Thomas Vickers"
        <redroach@e...> wrote:
        > I am getting material together to have a go at the Kelly Wise
        pattern and I
        > have a question.
        >
        > I don't want to use a pad in the hammock. For me, that would kill
        a lot of
        > the comfort and fun of it.
        >
        > So....
        > In order to stay warm in 35 + Degrees F, how thick of a synthetic
        insulation
        > should I try in the underpad?
        >
        > I won't try down on my first sewing attempt, so it is not an
        option.
        >
        > 1/2 inch?
        > 3/4 inch?
        > 1 inch ?
        >
        > Any of these too much? too little?
        >
        > TV
      • chcoa
        Okay, here s a question I ve been running around in my mind for a little while and your post reminded me..... If you use your poncho as a tarp, after you have
        Message 3 of 9 , Dec 7, 2004
          Okay, here's a question I've been running around in my mind for a
          little while and your post reminded me.....

          If you use your poncho as a tarp, after you have set up your shelter
          how do you do around camp things or go to the bathroom when it's
          raining? I guess you could just get a little wet or wait out the
          storm but sometimes that isn't an option. Is this a silly question?
          I just foresee needing the poncho at some point and not being able to
          use it because it's over my hammock.

          jamie in az

          --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, "Eric Sandberg"
          <docteric@y...> wrote:
          >
          > My insulated hammock, tarp/poncho, and sleeping quilt weight 3 lbs,
          > 1 oz including the stakes and lines - way less than the lightest
          > tent, bag, and pad setup I could find, and more comfortable to boot.
          >
          > Enjoy the woods,
          > Eric
        • J.D. Hoessle
          ... Eric, Thanks for this posting! I am impressed with the weight. My primary interest in studying hammocks and going to Springer on NYE has been to reduce
          Message 4 of 9 , Dec 8, 2004
            --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, "Eric Sandberg" <docteric@y...>
            wrote:
            > My insulated hammock, tarp/poncho, and sleeping quilt weight 3 lbs,
            > 1 oz including the stakes and lines - way less than the lightest
            > tent, bag, and pad setup I could find, and more comfortable to boot.

            Eric,

            Thanks for this posting! I am impressed with the weight. My primary
            interest in "studying" hammocks and going to Springer on NYE has been
            to reduce weight. Rapidly moving into first palce is the "comfort
            factor" that everyone raves about.

            Question(s):

            Does your set-up (sewing DIRECTLY) increase bulk significantly and
            become problematic when setting-up or stowing?

            Is it a Speer or H.H. ?

            Happy Trails,

            J.D.
          • Ray Garlington
            ... option. ... Just a word of support for this non-option, and an idea you might be able to work with. Down can be found very cheaply in the form of an old US
            Message 5 of 9 , Dec 8, 2004
              --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, "Thomas Vickers"
              <redroach@e...> wrote:
              > I won't try down on my first sewing attempt, so it is not an
              option.
              >

              Just a word of support for this non-option, and an idea you might be
              able to work with.

              Down can be found very cheaply in the form of an old US army mummy
              bag. One of those will do about 3 quilts. I got one for $1.00 at a
              flea market.

              Using this down and gardenville's idea of tubes you can control the
              down fairly easily. Just make enough silk tubes (use the silk gauze
              he refers to) that when put side by side will make a quilt of the
              desired size. Transfer the down to each silk tube using the vaccuum
              and a cardboard tube technique, then sew the end of each silk tube
              shut. Finally, make an outer silk bag (use a heavier silk, not
              gauze) and slide the tubes in. (This idea is basicaly gardenville's
              airmatress, without the mylar tubes)

              I haven't tried this yet, but plan to soon. The sewing for the tubes
              & outer bag is very easy, so don't worry about that. If you decide
              to try it, let us know how it works out for you.
            • Dick Matthews
              Jamie, I also carry a Dancing Light silnylon jacket and clip it to the hammock line. 4.4 oz. and can also be a vapor barrier shirt. Dick in CO
              Message 6 of 9 , Dec 8, 2004
                Jamie,

                I also carry a Dancing Light silnylon jacket and clip it to the hammock
                line. 4.4 oz. and can also be a vapor barrier shirt.

                Dick in CO

                chcoa wrote:

                >Okay, here's a question I've been running around in my mind for a
                >little while and your post reminded me.....
                >
                >If you use your poncho as a tarp, after you have set up your shelter
                >how do you do around camp things or go to the bathroom when it's
                >raining? I guess you could just get a little wet or wait out the
                >storm but sometimes that isn't an option. Is this a silly question?
                >I just foresee needing the poncho at some point and not being able to
                >use it because it's over my hammock.
                >
                >jamie in az
                >
                >
              • G. Herron
                ... wrote: I think sewing the insulation right to the bottom of the hammock is much warmer (See Rick s WarmHammock or the insulated hammock on The lightweight
                Message 7 of 9 , Dec 8, 2004
                  --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, "Eric Sandberg" <docteric@y...
                  wrote:
                  I think sewing the insulation right to the bottom of the hammock is
                  much warmer (See Rick's WarmHammock or the insulated hammock on "The
                  lightweight Backpacker" website).


                  Rick's WarmHammock - Could you give me a link to this.. I went to
                  the site and did a number of searchs and was unable to find anything..

                  Thanks
                • Rat
                  Here it is, located on the home page in the Hammock Links section. http://www.imrisk.com/hammock/warmhammock.htm ...
                  Message 8 of 9 , Dec 9, 2004
                    Here it is, located on the home page in the Hammock Links section.

                    http://www.imrisk.com/hammock/warmhammock.htm

                    --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, "G. Herron" <glherron46@y...>
                    wrote:
                    >
                    > --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, "Eric Sandberg"
                    <docteric@y...
                    > wrote:
                    > I think sewing the insulation right to the bottom of the hammock
                    is
                    > much warmer (See Rick's WarmHammock or the insulated hammock
                    on "The
                    > lightweight Backpacker" website).
                    >
                    >
                    > Rick's WarmHammock - Could you give me a link to this.. I went to
                    > the site and did a number of searchs and was unable to find
                    anything..
                    >
                    > Thanks
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