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Re: How far are you willing to go to make the hammock work?

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  • chcoa
    ... Hi Greg, I totally agree with you about the shelter being a tool. Although I think the hammock is worth the comfort it provides and have been really
    Message 1 of 53 , Dec 5, 2004
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      --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, "Gregory Doggett"
      <cqayaq@f...> wrote:
      >
      Hi Greg,
      I totally agree with you about the shelter being a tool. Although I
      think the hammock is worth the comfort it provides and have been
      really exploring options to keep it as my main shelter, the ground is
      not totally out of the question. I also have the added consideration
      of where I'm hiking. The desert isn't always the most hospitable
      place for an item needing 2 tie points and lugging that 4x4 post
      around while backpacking would totally throw my whole lighter pack is
      better theory right out the window. :)
      How cold have you been able to take your PeaPod set up?

      jamie in az


      > I like my hammock best when all I need is the tarp, foam pad and a
      > quilt. Having been an ultralight hiker and ground tarp user for
      > awhile before I discovered hammocks, I'm comfortable with my skill
      > at finding good ground sites. I can always travel lighter with a
      > ground based system so the weight and bulk of what gear I would
      need
      > just to be able to hammock would be my limiting factor in colder
      > weather. (Though the pure comfort of sleeping suspended in the air
      > is undisputably superior in my opinion)
      > For me, the gear is just a tool. And I want a tool that best suits
      > the hike.
      > If I can be warm, comfortable and do so with significantly less
      > weight, bulk and complexity in cold weather with a ground based
      > system....then the hammock stays home.
      > Many, however, choose to push the limits of hammocks in cold
      weather
      > and exclude all other shelters.
      > Hopefully their efforts will continue to pay off in lighter,simpler
      > and more thermally efficient systems.
      > I have a Speer Hammock, PeaPod and Top Blankets and a Hennessey
      > Explorer Ultralite Asym to give you an idea of what models I have
      > experience with. A Bozeman Mtn. Works Quantum Arc quilt is my
      cooler
      > temp sub for Top Blankets.
      > GND
      >
      >
      > GND
    • chcoa
      Since I m haning the a hammock above ground wouldn t cold air settling in the trench be a possitive though. That way it says down there and the warm air rises
      Message 53 of 53 , Dec 23, 2004
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        Since I'm haning the a hammock above ground wouldn't cold air
        settling in the trench be a possitive though. That way it says down
        there and the warm air rises up to me.????? OR would it serve to
        keep the whole area more cold, like something sitting on top of
        ice????

        jamie in az

        --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, "Coy" <starnescr@y...> wrote:
        >
        > the wind brake is good, dont know if cold air would settle in the
        > snow trench though. I have read where igloos have a low spot put in
        > them for the cold air and you sleep on snow benches higher up
        inside.
        > wish I got enough snow to play in.
        >
        > Coy Boy
        >
        > --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, "chcoa" <jdeben@h...> wrote:
        > >
        > > This is kind of what I'm envisioning. I was planning to hang a
        > > little lower to the ground though and pile the snow up on the
        sides a
        > > bit then hand my tarp so the hammock was completley enclosed. I
        was
        > > thinking it would be a good wind break and keep in warmth.
        > >
        > > I really wont know for sure if I can do this though until I get
        there
        > > and see how deep the snow is.
        > >
        > > jamie in az
        > >
        > > --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, "Clifford R. Haynes"
        > > <chaynes@g...> wrote:
        > > > I have slept in snow trenches often. In my opinion they are the
        > > easiest snow
        > > > shelters to build and when it gets really cold they are much
        warmer
        > > than a
        > > > tent.
        > > >
        > > > I have used my HH a lot during the winter. I normally dig out
        the
        > > snow under
        > > > the hammock and normally hang it as I would with no snow. I
        carry a
        > > large
        > > > tarp so I can go to the ground (or into the snow on the) on the
        up
        > > wind
        > > > side. If it is really cold I often shovel snow to block the
        ends,
        > > which sort
        > > > of creates a 3 sides lean-to. If you have everything set just
        right
        > > relative
        > > > to the wind, you can have a small warming fire with a reflector
        in
        > > the open
        > > > side. Kinda enjoyable to sit in the HH in your longhandles
        watching
        > > the fire
        > > > and dozing.
        > > > Rocky
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