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If I had a million dollars... sing along with me!

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  • gtvlfed
    Ok, just for fun, lets imagine we had a ton of money. And, for some more fun, lets say we spent a bit of that fortune on a Hennessey. And, for the final bit of
    Message 1 of 4 , Nov 29, 2004
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      Ok, just for fun, lets imagine we had a ton of money. And, for some
      more fun, lets say we spent a bit of that fortune on a Hennessey. And,
      for the final bit of fun, lets say we've gotten soft with all that
      money and need to pack reasonably light. What would be the ideal
      set-up to be warmly hung in the winter?

      I'm hearing many voices in favour of the JRB underquilt, a reflective
      layer, a wind/water-proof undercover and a wind proof/insulating
      overcover (designed to vent condensation). Could that system be
      bettered... if we had a million dollars? Are there "space-age"
      materials or designs that are just too much effort to construct?

      I've long been impressed by the innovation and resourcefulness of this
      group... I'd love to hear the visions.
    • Rick
      ... First off, I d think about finding someone who needed to feed their family and have her carry my pack - that would have me worrying less about the weight.
      Message 2 of 4 , Nov 29, 2004
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        gtvlfed wrote:

        >Ok, just for fun, lets imagine we had a ton of money. And, for some
        >more fun, lets say we spent a bit of that fortune on a Hennessey. And,
        >for the final bit of fun, lets say we've gotten soft with all that
        >money and need to pack reasonably light. What would be the ideal
        >set-up to be warmly hung in the winter?
        >
        >I've long been impressed by the innovation and resourcefulness of this
        >group... I'd love to hear the visions.
        >
        >
        >
        First off, I'd think about finding someone who needed to feed their
        family and have her carry my pack - that would have me worrying less
        about the weight.

        Second, I would be hanging my hammock in some nice warm clime - like New
        Zealand. That would take the bite off the winter blues.

        Rick
      • jwj32542
        ... How can a hammocker be well-hung in the winter? Get a bigger hammock! Here s my list for Speer-type hammock: - JRB Nest underquilt or similar - JRB
        Message 3 of 4 , Nov 29, 2004
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          --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, "gtvlfed" <jneale@d...> wrote:
          > What would be the ideal set-up to be warmly hung in the winter?

          How can a hammocker be well-hung in the winter? Get a bigger
          hammock!

          Here's my list for Speer-type hammock:

          - JRB Nest underquilt or similar
          - JRB No-Sniveller top quilt or similar
          - Another down quilt/bag for more insulation between underquilt and
          hammock. Something like JRB's Old Rag Mountain, although the SD
          Wicked Fastbag would work perfectly in this situation and stuffs to
          the size of a 1L Nalgene. About half the price of the ORM when on
          sale, too.
          - Waterproof/Breathable cocoon like Risk's TravelPod
          - Large tarp. An 8x10 silnylon tarp pitched A-frame against the
          wind can cut down quite a bit on the wind factor.
          - El-cheapo blue egg crate closed-cell pad. Use between quilt and
          hammock for additional loft, or use it to escape to the ground if
          the world got stupid-cold overnight. Or just to sleep in the
          shelter. Or to sit on. Or for support in your frameless pack.

          For a Hennessey, pretty much the same setup, except without the
          cocoon. The SuperShelter idea looks good, but I'd like a way to
          stuff more lightweight/low volume loft under there...like a down
          bag. Or maybe just a thicker silnylon underquilt cut on a radius
          would work.

          If money weren't an issue, I'd probably hire someone to build me a
          portable biodome (and hire a Sherpa to carry it) so I could hike in
          the winter and still sleep in the tropics. My biodome would be bug-
          free, and I would carry only a sheet to sleep with...no bag or tarp
          because I'd push the "no rain" button on the remote and keep it
          around 75*. I think a personal biodome might run you about one
          million once it hits full-scale production. Guess I'd have to get a
          day job to pay for the Sherpa, though. But talk about multi-use?
          He could carry my food and water, too. I'd carry my own clothes and
          snacks, lest somebody accuse me of not being a "real" hiker.

          Or what if there were a way to bring an electric blanket that ran
          for weeks on two lithium AAA's? There are already jackets with
          lights built into the sleeves ($600-700), and tents that glow the
          same way...I think they take AAA's. And a jacket that heats up like
          an electric blanket, too. Great for football games, I'm sure, but
          the battery weight is probably too much for a long hike.

          Better yet, run the heater wires right through the hammock AND
          incorporate a light on the ridgeline. Maybe even "porch lights" on
          the underside of the tarp. Add in a PocketMail/PDA charger and
          you're set.

          Solar recharging could help with this...I think there's already a
          solar cell that you can stick on your pack while you hike...for a
          PDA or something. So make a wide-brimmed all-weather hat, and the
          top/back of your pack, a flexible solar cell to charge your electric
          hammock with built-in light. And to recharge your six-pack-sized 2
          ounce fridge, but that might take a little more R&D.

          So there's a bit of brainstorming, if anyone has made it this far.
          Btw...I had a friend in college who SWORE that electric blankets
          gave you bone cancer.

          Jeff
        • J.D. Hoessle
          If money was not a problem... Find a few acres where I could raise a PACK GOAT...! Low impact on the enviro when hiking, faithful as a guide dog, eats
          Message 4 of 4 , Nov 29, 2004
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            If money was not a problem... Find a few acres where I could raise a
            PACK GOAT...! Low impact on the enviro when hiking, faithful as a
            guide dog, eats anything out there even in the winter, and could carry
            the biodome...<g>...

            Then, "Stephenson's Warmlite line of products" - makers of super
            tents, bags, and "fuzzy stuff" vapor barrier clothing and materials
            used by the sled dog folks. I have a feeling their stuff may be a
            possible answer for warmth.

            The balance of the money would go to the lawyers to gain access to the
            trails for my PACK GOAT.

            Happy Trails,

            J.D.


            --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, "gtvlfed" <jneale@d...> wrote:
            >
            > Ok, just for fun, lets imagine we had a ton of money. And, for some
            > more fun, lets say we spent a bit of that fortune on a Hennessey. And,
            > for the final bit of fun, lets say we've gotten soft with all that
            > money and need to pack reasonably light. What would be the ideal
            > set-up to be warmly hung in the winter?
            >
            > I'm hearing many voices in favour of the JRB underquilt, a reflective
            > layer, a wind/water-proof undercover and a wind proof/insulating
            > overcover (designed to vent condensation). Could that system be
            > bettered... if we had a million dollars? Are there "space-age"
            > materials or designs that are just too much effort to construct?
            >
            > I've long been impressed by the innovation and resourcefulness of this
            > group... I'd love to hear the visions.
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