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Happy T-Day....!

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  • J.D. Hoessle
    Good Morning, Everyone! Happy Thanksgiving and EAT TOO MUCH TURKEY, OK...? Wanted to be Out-There today having my turkey cooking over a camp fire; but, it
    Message 1 of 8 , Nov 25, 2004
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      Good Morning, Everyone!

      Happy Thanksgiving and EAT TOO MUCH TURKEY, OK...?

      Wanted to be "Out-There" today having my turkey cooking over a camp
      fire; but, it didn't work out this year...-<sigh>...

      But...!!! I am *seriously* considering this New Years Eve thing on
      Springer Mountain. Anyone else going or ever been there....?

      Happy Trails,

      J.D.
    • Rick
      ... I was there last year. Lots of fun. Good conversations. Most of us went to sleep before midnight. It s a bit far for me to drive down again - 9 hours for
      Message 2 of 8 , Nov 25, 2004
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        J.D. Hoessle wrote:

        >Good Morning, Everyone!
        >
        >Happy Thanksgiving and EAT TOO MUCH TURKEY, OK...?
        >
        >Wanted to be "Out-There" today having my turkey cooking over a camp
        >fire; but, it didn't work out this year...-<sigh>...
        >
        >But...!!! I am *seriously* considering this New Years Eve thing on
        >Springer Mountain. Anyone else going or ever been there....?
        >
        >Happy Trails,
        >
        >J.D.
        >
        >
        >
        I was there last year. Lots of fun. Good conversations. Most of us went
        to sleep before midnight.
        It's a bit far for me to drive down again - 9 hours for me. So I am not
        planning on a repeat.

        Risk
      • J.D. Hoessle
        ... Sounding better all the time! Thanks for the feed back, Risk! Yeah... Time & Distance... I live in Northern Virginia, 25 miles south of the White House.
        Message 3 of 8 , Nov 25, 2004
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          --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, Rick <ra1@i...> wrote:
          > I was there last year. Lots of fun. Good conversations. Most of us
          > went to sleep before midnight.
          > It's a bit far for me to drive down again - 9 hours for me. So I am
          > not planning on a repeat.

          Sounding better all the time! Thanks for the feed back, Risk!

          Yeah... Time & Distance... I live in Northern Virginia, 25 miles
          south of the White House. So, it's 600-700 miles for me too.

          But....!!! I have a cus who lives in a teeny crossroads town that is
          a little over 100 miles from Dohlonega. Thinking about inviting
          myself to his home for a night or two before going over on NYE.

          What...?!?!??!? Just re-read the above; you didn't stay awake to
          welcome in the New Year....?!?!?!?!?

          Happy Trails,

          J.D.
        • Rick
          ... I hiked the approach trail on NYE. The sun set at 530 PM and it was dark by 630. Staying up 5 1/2 hours after dark to midnight is a long time for long
          Message 4 of 8 , Nov 25, 2004
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            J.D. Hoessle wrote:

            >
            >What...?!?!??!? Just re-read the above; you didn't stay awake to
            >welcome in the New Year....?!?!?!?!?
            >
            >
            >
            I hiked the approach trail on NYE. The sun set at 530 PM and it was
            dark by 630. Staying up 5 1/2 hours after dark to midnight is a long
            time for long distance hikers.

            Risk
          • J.D. Hoessle
            ... First, I hope that you understand that was meant to be a joke? I am well aware of how tired one is at the end of the day. For years (pre-ultralight), my
            Message 5 of 8 , Nov 26, 2004
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              --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, Rick <ra1@i...> wrote:
              > I hiked the approach trail on NYE. The sun set at 530 PM and it was
              > dark by 630. Staying up 5 1/2 hours after dark to midnight is a long
              > time for long distance hikers.

              First, I hope that you understand that was meant to be a joke? I am
              well aware of how tired one is at the end of the day. For years
              (pre-ultralight), my *goal* each day was a race for distance, "one
              more climb", etc. Now, with ultralight (and AGE!), I find myself
              stopping to enjoy the flowers and setting up each night much earlier
              to enjoy my site, the view, and dinner. The benefits of ultralight
              are *REAL* for me at my age with a bad knee!

              But, even as in the old days, once the sun sets, I am usually
              out-like-the-proverb-light...<g>....

              People always ask me "How far did you hike?" and, I really don't know
              nor pay attention! If I have a two day "window", it is a day's hike
              in and a day's hike out with several hours of time well-spent
              gawking...<g>...

              Enjoyed looking around your website! Thanks for all of your info and
              work on that! Somewhere on your site I think I detected that you are
              in Ohio...? I grew up on a farm in Wooster.

              Happy Trails,

              J.D.
            • Shane
              ... You re projecting. I, for one, often stay up until midnight when I m out. Even when I was doing a lot of long distance hiking, my motto was: Late to bed
              Message 6 of 8 , Nov 26, 2004
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                > I hiked the approach trail on NYE. The sun set at 530 PM and it was
                > dark by 630. Staying up 5 1/2 hours after dark to midnight is a long
                > time for long distance hikers.

                You're projecting.

                I, for one, often stay up until midnight when I'm out. Even when I was
                doing a lot of long distance hiking, my motto was:

                Late to bed
                Late to rise
                Lets a man think
                And watch the skies.

                I also did a lot of night walking in the desert. If you have never done
                night walking in the desert by the light of a full moon, then you have
                missed something divine.

                I have strange sleep habits, though. Sometimes I will go to sleep as early
                as six or seven and get UP at midnight or one and walk in the early morning.
                I am a creature of the night, and I like to spend equal time with all eight
                phases of the day.

                Shane
              • Rick
                ... True. I should know better by now. ... I have done a lot better with the long nights this year than last. I go to bed as early as I feel tired. I read
                Message 7 of 8 , Nov 26, 2004
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                  Shane wrote:

                  >>I hiked the approach trail on NYE. The sun set at 530 PM and it was
                  >>dark by 630. Staying up 5 1/2 hours after dark to midnight is a long
                  >>time for long distance hikers.
                  >>
                  >>
                  >
                  >You're projecting.
                  >
                  >

                  True. I should know better by now.

                  >I, for one, often stay up until midnight when I'm out. Even when I was
                  >doing a lot of long distance hiking, my motto was:
                  >
                  >Late to bed
                  >Late to rise
                  >Lets a man think
                  >And watch the skies.
                  >
                  >
                  I have done a lot better with the long nights this year than last. I go
                  to bed as early as I feel tired. I read for a while until my eyes will
                  not stay open any longer. I try to accept the night and demonstrate this
                  by refusing to look at my watch either at bed time or anytime in the
                  middle of the night. I get up sometimes and stay up to listen to the
                  night or (if alone) to play NA flute to the darkness for a while. When
                  I run out of sleepiness sometime early in the morning, if it is not
                  beginning to get light, I pull out my book or journal and work on it for
                  a while. When light can easily be seen, I begin the breakfast and camp
                  chores of the morning.

                  >I also did a lot of night walking in the desert. If you have never done
                  >night walking in the desert by the light of a full moon, then you have
                  >missed something divine.
                  >
                  >I have strange sleep habits, though. Sometimes I will go to sleep as early
                  >as six or seven and get UP at midnight or one and walk in the early morning.
                  >I am a creature of the night, and I like to spend equal time with all eight
                  >phases of the day.
                  >
                  >Shane
                  >
                  >
                  Sounds nice. Sometimes I have conversations in the winter with the
                  stars of Orion. Rigel and Bellatrix "get into it" sometimes and I
                  break up the arguments, helping them to become good constellation mates
                  again. ;) Or so I imagine as I sleepily look up and remind myself of
                  their names. I suspect that Saiph may not have everyone's best
                  interests at heart and I quiz him on his recent travels and what weapons
                  he might be carrying.

                  Risk
                • Shane Steinkamp
                  ... It s not so bad down here. We get at least 11 hours of daylight even on the solstice. When I was hiking in Alaska and the Northwest Territories, it was
                  Message 8 of 8 , Nov 26, 2004
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                    > I have done a lot better with the long nights this year than
                    > last. I go to bed as early as I feel tired. I read for a
                    > while until my eyes will not stay open any longer. I try to
                    > accept the night and demonstrate this by refusing to look at my
                    > watch either at bed time or anytime in the middle of the night.

                    It's not so bad down here. We get at least 11 hours of daylight even on the
                    solstice. When I was hiking in Alaska and the Northwest Territories, it was
                    really bad.

                    > I get up sometimes and stay up to listen to the night or (if
                    > alone) to play NA flute to the darkness for a while.

                    Oh! I would just love that! Midnight serenade...

                    > When I run out of sleepiness sometime early in the morning, if
                    > it is not beginning to get light, I pull out my book or journal
                    > and work on it for a while. When light can easily be seen, I
                    > begin the breakfast and camp chores of the morning.

                    I'm a strange animal. I have chronic insomnia in the 'real world'. When
                    I'm out in the woods, I can sleep whenever I want to.

                    > Sounds nice. Sometimes I have conversations in the winter with
                    > the stars of Orion. Rigel and Bellatrix "get into it"
                    > sometimes and I break up the arguments, helping them to become
                    > good constellation mates again. ;) Or so I imagine as I
                    > sleepily look up and remind myself of their names. I suspect
                    > that Saiph may not have everyone's best interests at heart and
                    > I quiz him on his recent travels and what weapons
                    > he might be carrying.

                    You're just about as weird as I am. I'm glad.

                    It's all just pieces of you.

                    Shane
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