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early spring/late fall in a speer hammock

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  • shadesofblue33
    I m looking at a late march section hike in the spring and have started thinking about how to keep warmer. I ve looked at Ed s site, and a lot of the
    Message 1 of 3 , Nov 23, 2004
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      I'm looking at a late march section hike in the spring and have
      started thinking about how to keep warmer. I've looked at Ed's site,
      and a lot of the suggestions have been very helpful. I tend to sleep
      cooler though, and have had to up the gear a little.
      Here is my question: After using a speer quilt in between the
      hammock and the pea pod, what type of sleeping bag should I use as a
      quilt.
      I'd like to be able to use this bag on a NOBO thru-hike of the AT in
      a few years, and I want quality. I've been thinking about Western
      Mountaineering, but am unsure of how low on the degree scale I should
      go. I don't want total overkill because of weight...but I want to be
      able to trust my gear to keep me warm, and safe. Any ideas? The
      lowest I've felt comfortable in the speer pea pod and speer quilt was
      in the mid-low 40's. (Nothing against his gear it's great...I just
      sleep cool.)
      Thanks!
    • Jim
      I classify myself as a moderately cold sleeper. My basic Speer sleep system: Speer 8.5 Hammock /sealed with a DWR coating (this did make a difference!) Speer
      Message 2 of 3 , Nov 23, 2004
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        I classify myself as a moderately cold sleeper.

        My basic Speer sleep system:

        Speer 8.5 Hammock /sealed with a DWR coating (this did make a
        difference!)
        Speer Pea Pod w/overstuffing
        Big Agnes Horse Thief - 35 degree rating
        Reflectix Pad cut to fit inside of BA pad sleeve

        With this combo I've gone down to the low 40's with no problems.

        I've gone to the upper 30's with just an unsealed Speer hammock and
        a combination of a blue walmart pad glued to a piece of reflectix.
        The only problem that I had was that my shoulders got a little cold,
        which I remedied by putting my Z-rest frame sheet from my G4 pack
        under my shoulders.

        This past weekend I used my pea pod with a 30" wide piece of
        reflectix and a thermarest 4 and only a speer top blanket. The
        temps only got down to the low 50's and I was hot most of the night,
        and I really didn't even need the top blanket.

        I suspect that a combo of the pea pod & top blanket under the
        hammock,along with a wide reflectix pad & thermarest inside my BA
        bag would allow me to go to the upper 20's with no problems.

        I'll keep experimenting this winter and post my results as I have
        the opportunity.

        Jim

        --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, "shadesofblue33"
        <shadesofblue33@y...> wrote:
        >
        > I'm looking at a late march section hike in the spring and have
        > started thinking about how to keep warmer. I've looked at Ed's
        site,
        > and a lot of the suggestions have been very helpful. I tend to
        sleep
        > cooler though, and have had to up the gear a little.
        > Here is my question: After using a speer quilt in between the
        > hammock and the pea pod, what type of sleeping bag should I use as
        a
        > quilt.
        > I'd like to be able to use this bag on a NOBO thru-hike of the AT
        in
        > a few years, and I want quality. I've been thinking about Western
        > Mountaineering, but am unsure of how low on the degree scale I
        should
        > go. I don't want total overkill because of weight...but I want to
        be
        > able to trust my gear to keep me warm, and safe. Any ideas? The
        > lowest I've felt comfortable in the speer pea pod and speer quilt
        was
        > in the mid-low 40's. (Nothing against his gear it's great...I
        just
        > sleep cool.)
        > Thanks!
      • Gregory Doggett
        ... a ... in ... should ... be ... Shadesofblue33, Although the design is somewhat radical compared to what we think of as a sleeping bag, I have quite
        Message 3 of 3 , Nov 25, 2004
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          --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, "shadesofblue33"
          <shadesofblue33@y...> wrote:
          >
          > > Here is my question: After using a speer quilt in between the
          > hammock and the pea pod, what type of sleeping bag should I use as
          a
          > quilt.
          > I'd like to be able to use this bag on a NOBO thru-hike of the AT
          in
          > a few years, and I want quality. I've been thinking about Western
          > Mountaineering, but am unsure of how low on the degree scale I
          should
          > go. I don't want total overkill because of weight...but I want to
          be
          > able to trust my gear to keep me warm, and safe. Any ideas?

          Shadesofblue33,
          Although the design is somewhat radical compared to what we think of
          as a sleeping bag, I have quite possibly found my ultimate ground/
          hammock sleeping "bag" in the Bozeman Mountainworks Quantum Arc
          Variable Girth Sleeping Bag. Very high quality. Pertex Quantum
          fabric inside and out, a unique tappered baffle layout that goes
          from 2" at the neck to 3.5" at the feet. No hood (use your warm
          hat), no bottom , though the design does wrap round the shoulders
          well. High count down fill. About a pound total weight.
          As for a temp rating, BMW doesn't rate their bag, but depending on
          who you trust I've seen bags with a 2" loft rated to 20 degrees (
          Ray Jardines' ETR system) and the very similar Nunatak Arc bags 2"
          models rated at 32 degrees. By the way, Nunatak builds the Quantum
          Arc for BMW.
          The nice thing about this Variable Girth feature is that you can
          wear additional clothing inside the bag, but by utilizing the girth
          adjustment feature, still make plenty of room for yourself without
          compressing the bags loft. With my Golite Coal jacket on, it becomes
          my winter bag.
          But I've rambled on enough.
          Check out www.backpackinglight.com and look on the left sidebar for
          products under "Sleeping".
          Also take a look at www.nunatakgear.com , the Arc series bags.
          Greg
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