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Re: 1st weekend backpacking in homemade Speer hammock

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  • dlfrost_1
    ... Insulation works by slowing the passage of heat. However, your extremities generate less heat than your torso, so coldness is felt there first. What your
    Message 1 of 2 , Nov 8, 2004
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      --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, "Kathy Kantz"
      <kathykantz@s...> wrote:
      > The first night my upper half was warm but for some reason my hips
      > and legs were cold. My fleece jacket is thicker than my fleece
      > pants to I figured that was the reason.

      Insulation works by slowing the passage of heat. However, your
      extremities generate less heat than your torso, so coldness is felt
      there first. What your cold legs are telling you is that the
      insulation you had was barely adequate for the given conditions.

      > I definitely need to try a Pea Pod, and
      > use a wider pad, possibly under the hammock as I seemed to wrestle
      > with the blue pad trying to angle my body to lay flat. Also I need
      > to string a clothesline under the tarp and hang a small mesh bag
      for
      > my flashlight and anything I may need at night.

      Lots of folks use the 24" wide "eggcrate" pads that WalMart sells
      because they're wider and because they seem to ride well in a
      hammock. You can also cut a thinner pad in half and lay it
      underneath crosswise at the shoulder--so they stick out like wings--
      to get more wrap-around at that point.

      You can trim two opposing corners off of the pad(s) to get a better
      fit when laying it partway across the centerline, Hennessey style.
      Fold the corners back and hold them with safety pins temporarily
      while you figure out how much to cut and at what angle. (Be careful
      the pins don't open accidentally during testing.)

      In both my hammocks (Hennessey, homemade) I have a length of line
      dropping out of each end for (a) sliding myself into position by
      pulling, and (b) attaching storage pockets of some sort (mesh bag,
      whatever) at the upper end(s). Bugnet ridgelines are rather
      convenient for hanging lights though...

      Doug Frost
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