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Isle Royale trip

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  • Chet Clocksin
    Hi all, I haven t been active on the list for a long time, other than checking my email and reading posts from others on the list as time permits. Just wanted
    Message 1 of 5 , Nov 4, 2004
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      Hi all,
      I haven't been active on the list for a long time, other than checking my
      email and reading posts from others on the list as time permits.
      Just wanted to tell everyone that I had a fantastic trip to Isle Royale, our
      nations least visited National Park, last week of August/first week of
      September.
      There were four in our group, 3 of us using our home made Speer style
      hammocks, and one poor soul who used a one person, bivy style tent. The
      island was very rugged, and though our mileage was low, (typically 5 to 8
      miles a day), it was grueling due to our choice of Hiking across the island
      (North/South). We used our hammocks every night except the very first, which
      is also the only night it rained. We had no choice but to set up in a dish
      shaped tent site since there were no suitable trees in the immediate area. I
      say the immediate area because it was getting close to dark and our cross
      country permits required that we set up a 1/2 mile from any trail if we
      chose not to use a designated camp site, and the island is so thick with
      vegetation that it would have been impractical without a machete (a definate
      no no). We were fine under my White Lightnin' tarp (which, by the way, is an
      excellent piece of gear), if not exactly comfortable. The next 6 nights we
      were had no trouble hanging our hammocks in designated campites, and even
      pitched them inside a shelter at MacCargoe Cove for two nights. One night I
      was able to pitch my hammock right on the shore of Lake Superior, with the
      water crashing onto the rocks no more than 10 feet away.The hammocks were of
      course extremely comfortable, and with temps ranging from the high 30s the
      first night, to in the forties or higher the rest of the trip, we were all
      warm and happy. My oldest brother, who struggled with the decision to take a
      hammock instead of a tent, thanked me profusely for convincing him to use
      the hammock. Bugs were non existant, and the weather during the day was from
      50 to 70 degrees, perfect for hiking. We saw a moose within 15 minutes from
      the time we got dropped off via water taxi at Chippewa Harbor. It was up
      close and personal, probably 30 feet away. Awesome! We saw several other
      moose, an eagle, several foxes, etc. during our trek, and I have to say it
      was the most fantastic place I've ever been. Its a little difficult getting
      there, but well worth the effort. It was a 12 hour drive followed by a 4 and
      a half hour boat ride to the island, then another 30 or 45 minutes on a
      water taxi to our drop off site. Get there if you can.

      Chet
    • Risk
      Nice trip report Chet. I have read that the water there is contaminated with a particularly nasty little beastie. It is one of the few wilderness places I
      Message 2 of 5 , Nov 4, 2004
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        Nice trip report Chet.

        I have read that the water there is contaminated with a particularly
        nasty little beastie. It is one of the few wilderness places I would
        not want to drink unfiltered, untreated water. It had something to do
        with wolves and bears living in close proximity. Any comments on the
        water?

        Rick

        --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, "Chet Clocksin"
        <cclocksin@b...> wrote:
        > Hi all,
        > Just wanted to tell everyone that I had a fantastic trip to Isle
        Royale, our
        > nations least visited National Park, last week of August/first week of
        > September....
      • Chet Clocksin
        Funny you should ask. We were very concerned about water treatment, due to the warnings about tapeworms eggs. We took filters good down to at least .4 microns,
        Message 3 of 5 , Nov 4, 2004
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          Funny you should ask. We were very concerned about water treatment, due to the warnings about tapeworms eggs. We took filters good down to at least .4 microns, and treated all of our drinking water. But guess what? My brother had a hanging bag of water/filter system, and I inadverdantly filled up 4 quarts of of water without realizing the filter wasn't attached, which we consumed untreated. We were anticipating the worst, but had no ill effects, and when I got home my doctor told me not to worry about it. He said you can only get a tapeworm infection from eating raw meat or fish that is infected. Also, even though the NPS warns about the tapeworm egg in Isle Royale giudebooks, I think they also state that there hasn't been a case of a human getting infected for several decades. Oh ya, and other than that, the water is c-c-c-cold!
           
          Chet
          -----Original Message-----
          From: Risk [mailto:ra1@...]
          Sent: Thursday, November 04, 2004 2:31 PM
          To: hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com
          Subject: [Hammock Camping] Re: Isle Royale trip


          Nice trip report Chet. 

          I have read that the water there is contaminated with a particularly
          nasty little beastie.  It is one of the few wilderness places I would
          not want to drink unfiltered, untreated water. It had something to do
          with wolves and bears living in close proximity. Any comments on the
          water?

          Rick

          --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, "Chet Clocksin"
          <cclocksin@b...> wrote:
          > Hi all,
          > Just wanted to tell everyone that I had a fantastic trip to Isle
          Royale, our
          > nations least visited National Park, last week of August/first week of
          > September....




        • dlfrost_1
          ... 30s the ... were all ... What sort of cold-weather setup were you using with the hammocks? Doug Frost
          Message 4 of 5 , Nov 5, 2004
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            --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, "Chet Clocksin"
            <cclocksin@b...> wrote:
            > The hammocks were of
            > course extremely comfortable, and with temps ranging from the high
            30s the
            > first night, to in the forties or higher the rest of the trip, we
            were all
            > warm and happy.

            What sort of cold-weather setup were you using with the hammocks?

            Doug Frost
          • Chet Clocksin
            We re pretty low-tech, but our set-up worked very well. We all made double bottom hammocks (2 layers of 1.1 oz ripstop), and use a 3/8 thick closed cell foam
            Message 5 of 5 , Nov 6, 2004
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              We're pretty low-tech, but our set-up worked very well. We all made double bottom hammocks (2 layers of 1.1 oz ripstop), and use a 3/8 thick closed cell foam pad approximately 40 x 36 in between the layers. We also throw a space blanket in between the layers to act as a wind break, and sometimes tuck our rain gear in there too. I didn't need to on this trip, but If it gets much below 40, I'll fashion my sleeping bag over the hammock as a peapod and sleep in a most of my layers. We all used sleeping bags rated to 20 or 25  degrees, and slept in them rather than using them as a quilt.
               
              Chet
              -----Original Message-----
              From: dlfrost_1 [mailto:dlfrost@...]
              Sent: Saturday, November 06, 2004 2:15 AM
              To: hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com
              Subject: [Hammock Camping] Re: Isle Royale trip


              --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, "Chet Clocksin"
              <cclocksin@b...> wrote:
              > The hammocks were of
              > course extremely comfortable, and with temps ranging from the high
              30s the
              > first night, to in the forties or higher the rest of the trip, we
              were all
              > warm and happy.

              What sort of cold-weather setup were you using with the hammocks?

              Doug Frost





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