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Re: [Hammock Camping] Open vs. Closed Cell Pads

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  • jwj32542
    I m about to try open cell inside my two-layer hammock for the first time, but I think it will breathe much better than the closed cell. I woke up with a wet
    Message 1 of 6 , Oct 26, 2004
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      I'm about to try open cell inside my two-layer hammock for the first
      time, but I think it will breathe much better than the closed cell.
      I woke up with a wet back and sleeping bag when I tried the closed
      cell...that's why I won't use it again.

      This open cell is from Walmart with a layer of closed cell at the
      bottom. I'm hoping that will block the wind, while the open cell
      will move moisture next to my body so I don't have the condensation
      issues.

      Jeff
    • Paul Kaercher
      ... Open cell foam collapses from your body weight to a far greater degree than closed cell foam. Collapsed foam = reduced R valu. Thus the trend towards
      Message 2 of 6 , Oct 26, 2004
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        >
        > Did I miss anything??


        Open cell foam collapses from your body weight
        to a far greater degree than closed cell foam.
        Collapsed foam = reduced R valu.
        Thus the trend towards putting open cell foam
        under the hammock so the foam retains its "loft"

        Paul
      • Dave Womble
        ... keep it dry. ... Ralph, That s not what I would have thought. I thought most hammockers used closed cell foam pads because the pads typically support all
        Message 3 of 6 , Oct 26, 2004
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          --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, Ralph Oborn <Ralph.oborn@g...>
          wrote:
          > I think the consensus is for hammocking use open cell if you can
          keep it dry.
          >

          Ralph,

          That's not what I would have thought. I thought most hammockers used
          closed cell foam pads because the pads typically support all or most
          of the occupants weight and that open cell foam pads would be
          compressed too much to provide significant insulation. Exceptions to
          this are self inflating pads that use open cell foam but also trap
          air to keep you from completely compressing the foam and the under-
          hammock approach that Hennessy has recently employed which also
          positions the open cell foam in a way that attempts to keep you from
          significantly compressing it.

          All compressable under-hammock insulation has a fit issue, in that if
          it is too tight you compress some/all of the insulation and don't get
          much insulation from it and if it is too loose you get some
          convection heat transfer because of the air gaps that limits the
          insulation you can get from your conductive insulating layer.

          Youngblood
        • zippydooda
          I think Ralph was saying to use the open cell under the hammock, rather than in the hammock, for the reason that you mentioned. Bill in Houston ...
          Message 4 of 6 , Oct 26, 2004
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            I think Ralph was saying to use the open cell under the hammock,
            rather than in the hammock, for the reason that you mentioned.

            Bill in Houston

            --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, "Dave Womble" <dpwomble@y...>
            wrote:
            >
            > --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, Ralph Oborn
            <Ralph.oborn@g...>
            > wrote:
            > > I think the consensus is for hammocking use open cell if you can
            > keep it dry.
            > >
            >
            > Ralph,
            >
            > That's not what I would have thought. I thought most hammockers
            used
            > closed cell foam pads because the pads typically support all or
            most
            > of the occupants weight and that open cell foam pads would be
            > compressed too much to provide significant insulation. Exceptions
            to
            > this are self inflating pads that use open cell foam but also trap
            > air to keep you from completely compressing the foam and the under-
            > hammock approach that Hennessy has recently employed which also
            > positions the open cell foam in a way that attempts to keep you
            from
            > significantly compressing it.
            >
            > All compressable under-hammock insulation has a fit issue, in that
            if
            > it is too tight you compress some/all of the insulation and don't
            get
            > much insulation from it and if it is too loose you get some
            > convection heat transfer because of the air gaps that limits the
            > insulation you can get from your conductive insulating layer.
            >
            > Youngblood
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