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RE: [Hammock Camping] Re: Can you make an asym hammock

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  • Shane Steinkamp
    ... I can rock in my asym. Why shouldn t I be able to? ... Simply don t tie them. I never tie the pullouts... ... I use a 27 pad, and with the asym design,
    Message 1 of 26 , Oct 4, 2004
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      > Without the associated side pullouts currently used to form an
      > asymmetrical shape, I can gently rock in my hammock.

      I can rock in my asym. Why shouldn't I be able to?

      > I think the side pullouts used with the current asymmetrical
      > hammocks are somewhat problematic for a side entry hammock and that
      > is my preferred entry method.

      Simply don't tie them. I never tie the pullouts...

      > In my experience, the bottom entry method is
      > more difficult to deal with when you need bottom side insulation and
      > I usually need something for bottom side insulation since I mostly
      > hammock camp in the mountains where night time temperatures require
      > at least some insulation.

      I use a 27" pad, and with the asym design, the edge of the pad is right at
      the base of the slit. This is perfect. I sit on the pad right where I need
      to be. The slit is never an issue. It IS an issue in a non-asym hammock if
      there is a bottom slit.

      > There is not anything preventing a person from laying diagonal in a
      > well designed hammock that doesn't have an asymmetrical shape.

      But it's NOT the same thing.

      > I
      > can lay diagonal to the left, diagonal to the right or right down
      > the enter axis of my hammocks.

      I can lay diagonal to the left, and I can lay down the center. I usually do
      when I'm reading. I can't lay diagonal to the right. I thought that this
      might be a problem at first because most of my life I slept diagonal to the
      right, but I quickly got used to laying left.

      > I find that laying on a diagonal sometimes results in a slight
      > discomfort to the shoulders that I refer to as `shoulder squeeze'.

      This is not an issue in an asym hammock.

      > I found that I am sometimes more comfortable lying down the center
      > axis of the hammock and primarily
      > just shifting my feet and legs either to the left or right until I
      > find my sweet spot. I think the asymmetrical design encourages one
      > to lay on a more severe diagonal and to one particular side, I like
      > the freedom to pick the side if I choose to lay on a diagonal.

      There is a lot of play in it. This is your preference, and that's fair
      enough.

      > But these are just my opinions and we all are entitled to our own.
      > Obviously, many people genuinely like the asymmetrical design. I
      > think it is great that we have these choices.

      Agreed, but some of the above forces me to ask a rude question. Have you
      ever actually TRIED an asym hammock? Hennessey or no?

      Shane
    • Jerry Goller
      I know....I was agreeing with you. It *does* happen, from time to time...... ;o) Jerry http://www.BackpackGearTest.org : the
      Message 2 of 26 , Oct 4, 2004
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        Message
        I know....I was agreeing with you. It *does* happen, from time to time......   ;o)
        Jerry
         
         

        http://www.BackpackGearTest.org : the most comprehensive interactive gear reviews and tests on the planet.

         

        -----Original Message-----
        From: Shane Steinkamp [mailto:shane@...]
        Sent: Monday, October 04, 2004 9:29 PM
        To: hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com
        Subject: RE: [Hammock Camping] Re: Can you make an asym hammock

        > > Actually it has to do with the bias of the cloth.

        > It also has to do with the characteristics of the fabric weave. It
        > stretches more in one direction than the other.

        Yeah...  That's what bias means...

        Shane


      • Shane
        Message I know....I was agreeing with you. It *does* happen, from time to ... Ah. OK, then. I was caught off guard by that... ;) Shane
        Message 3 of 26 , Oct 5, 2004
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          Message> I know....I was agreeing with you. It *does* happen, from time to
          > time...... ;o)

          Ah. OK, then. I was caught off guard by that... ;)

          Shane
        • Dave Womble
          Shane, Okay, I see what you meant. I didn t realize that the fabric for the hammock bed is oriented such that it is on a diagonal to the fabric weave, or like
          Message 4 of 26 , Oct 5, 2004
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            Shane,

            Okay, I see what you meant. I didn't realize that the fabric for the
            hammock bed is oriented such that it is on a diagonal to the fabric
            weave, or like you said, on a bias of the cloth. Thanks for pointing
            that out, that does mean that what I stated was not correct. I now
            see that the side pullouts are positioned to 'compliment' the asym
            nature of the hammock rather than 'causing' the asym nature.

            Youngblood
          • ptoddf@aol.com
            Shane, Many thanks for your explanation of the bias cut for asym hammock design. I wasn t aware of this and it adds an important new dimension to my attempts
            Message 5 of 26 , Oct 5, 2004
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              Shane,
               
              Many thanks for your explanation of the bias cut for asym hammock design. I wasn't aware of this and it adds an important new dimension to my attempts using my test hammock. See post on my variation on this idea.
               
              I like the HH too, but I want to make a light, efficient open hammock, without net or other HH features that is as comfortable.
               
              Best, Todd in Tarzana.
            • Dave Womble
              ... wrote: ... Agreed, but some of the above forces me to ask a rude question. Have you ... Yes, I used one extensively on backpacking trips for about a year.
              Message 6 of 26 , Oct 5, 2004
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                --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, "Shane Steinkamp" <shane@t...>
                wrote:
                ...> Agreed, but some of the above forces me to ask a rude question.
                Have you
                > ever actually TRIED an asym hammock? Hennessey or no?
                >
                > Shane

                Yes, I used one extensively on backpacking trips for about a year.
                It was the Hennessy UtraLight Backpacker Asym, which was the first
                asym model that came out and the only asym model available at the
                time I purchased it.

                I believe we had discussions previously where we disagreed on a
                particular point and someone wisely pointed out that the hammock you
                were using was larger that the one I had and that might be why we saw
                details differently. I believe you use the Hennessy Explorer Deluxe
                A-Sym, which is a bit larger than the one I used. That might again
                explain some of the different opinions as well as the fact that I
                used the side pullouts with mine and you apparently do not. But then
                again, it is also possible that we see the same thing but judge it
                differently... such is life.

                Youngblood
              • ptoddf@aol.com
                On test hammocks, Risk has a great idea there. Thanks, Risk. Try this variation so you can try different gathers and bias ideas: Instead of an end knot, pass
                Message 7 of 26 , Oct 5, 2004
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                  On test hammocks, Risk has a great idea there. Thanks, Risk.
                   
                  Try this variation so you can try different gathers and bias ideas:
                   
                  Instead of an end knot, pass the gathered material on each end through a Home Depot welded steel ring, about 2" in diameter and 3/16" thick. Secure the material to itself with a split piece of black rubber hose and a standard stainless steel worm-gear hose clamp. Buy the hose, about 1 and 1/2 inch in diameter from the same store. You can buy 1 foot off the roll, cut this into about 2 1/2" segments and split them along oneside with a knife. Cut out 1/8" or so if the hose doesn't close tightly enough around the folded hammock end.
                   
                  This allows you to clamp and unclamp in minutes.
                   
                  WARNING!!! If this is not done right the material can slip through and you'll hit the ground! This happened to me the first time I tried it.
                   
                  Make sure the clamp is very tight, don't hang the hammock very high, and put a lounge chair pad on the ground underneath just in case.
                  Better would be to sew a safety margin on the end of the material so it can't slip throught the clamp even if it slips. This is for design testing only!
                   
                  I learned a huge amount from doing different folding and rolling schemes,  including off-axis rolls and folds. There's nothing like lying in a hammock real time to figure out what's going on, and this method makes it possible. Small changes have large, non-obvious results.
                   
                  If this is not clear, speak up and I'll post pictures.
                   
                  Best, Todd in Tarzana.
                • zippydooda
                  So, can you tell us what you learned? Especially on the off axis stuff... Bill in Houston ... schemes, ... hammock real ... possible. Small
                  Message 8 of 26 , Oct 5, 2004
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                    So, can you tell us what you learned? Especially on the off axis
                    stuff...

                    Bill in Houston

                    --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, ptoddf@a... wrote:
                    > On test hammocks, Risk has a great idea there. Thanks, Risk.
                    > <snip>
                    > I learned a huge amount from doing different folding and rolling
                    schemes,
                    > including off-axis rolls and folds. There's nothing like lying in a
                    hammock real
                    > time to figure out what's going on, and this method makes it
                    possible. Small
                    > changes have large, non-obvious results.
                    >
                    > If this is not clear, speak up and I'll post pictures.
                    >
                    > Best, Todd in Tarzana.
                  • Amy Skowronek
                    ... I ve used this model as well. I ve slept in it for about a month total. I used the older non-asym ultralight backpacker on the trail for about a month,
                    Message 9 of 26 , Oct 5, 2004
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                      On Oct 5, 2004, at 10:49 AM, Dave Womble wrote:

                      >
                      >
                      > --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, "Shane Steinkamp" <shane@t...>
                      > wrote:
                      > ...> Agreed, but some of the above forces me to ask a rude question.
                      > Have you
                      >> ever actually TRIED an asym hammock? Hennessey or no?
                      >>
                      >> Shane
                      >
                      > Yes, I used one extensively on backpacking trips for about a year.
                      > It was the Hennessy UtraLight Backpacker Asym, which was the first
                      > asym model that came out and the only asym model available at the
                      > time I purchased it.
                      >
                      >

                      I've used this model as well. I've slept in it for about a month total.

                      I used the older non-asym ultralight backpacker on the trail for about
                      a month, too.
                      The big difference to me was that when I rolled over in the asym I
                      didn't
                      need to switch diagonals. I almost always sleep with a pad in the
                      hammock
                      so switching diagonals is a pain. It didn't feel roomier to me. (But
                      I'm 5'4",
                      so I had plenty of room to start with.)

                      -amy
                    • Ray Garlington
                      ... sewed ... This is similar to what I did, but I used a shape more like a parallelogram, like so: http://tinyurl.com/62zmc I kept the bias of the cloth
                      Message 10 of 26 , Oct 5, 2004
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                        --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, "seuss910" <wrv77@y...> wrote:
                        > Asymmetry was achieved with the cut of the hammock, not so much
                        > with the fold. I started with a kind of squared off trapezoid,
                        sewed
                        > a soft webbing along the end hems for bulk, pleated the ends, and
                        > then tied the hanging straps around the bunched ends.
                        >

                        This is similar to what I did, but I used a shape more like a
                        parallelogram, like so: http://tinyurl.com/62zmc

                        I kept the bias of the cloth aligned with the support points (i.e.
                        centerline of the hammock), since you don't want any stretch in that
                        dimension. I got a moderate asym feel with a 3" cut on each side.
                        I'd be tempted to go to about 6" for the next try.
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