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orientation and directions

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  • uluheman
    I have a good friend who cannot tell left from right, and, apparently, it s not that uncommon. Also, there are other frames of reference around the world,
    Message 1 of 14 , Oct 1, 2004
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      I have a good friend who cannot tell left from right, and,
      apparently, it's not that uncommon.

      Also, there are other frames of reference around the world, which may
      be of interest to hikers. Here on Oahu, it is highly uncommon to use
      compass directions. Almost universally, directions are given in terms
      of mauka (toward the mountains, which generally means towards the
      center of an island) and makai (toward the ocean). Local towns or
      landmarks are used to specify circumferential movement. Thus, one
      might need to go "five blocks mauka and one block Diamond Head" to
      get to a certain destination. It's basically a polar coordinate
      system.

      Furthermore, the mountains are so scored by deep valleys with steep
      walls and narrow ridgelines that it's usually impossible to follow a
      compass bearing. My impression is that most of us who spend a lot of
      time in our mountains think spatially in terms of a network of
      existing or potential pathways rather than a continuous Cartesian
      plane.

      Nevertheless, I've been known to trip over my guylines.

      Aloha,

      Brandon in Honolulu


      --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, Ralph Oborn <Ralph.oborn@g...>
      wrote:
      > Local or inertial frame of reference (in physics terms). I locate
      the
      > guy wires as they are in the greater environment, you might locate
      > them in relation to the hammock. I always visualize things as
      > orthogonally oriented even though I know it isn't exactly North
      South
      > etc. (Architects call things "plan north". So in the middle of the
      > night I know where the hammock is but I can't remember how it or the
      > guy lines are placed until I trip over them (literally). It is part
      of
      > a minor learning disability.
      >
      > I always!! give directions North South, I don't know left from right
      > in any consistent manner unless I am facing north. I almost flunked
      my
      > driving test here and in England because of that. Winding English
      > streets drove me nuts for two years. I really like the way Brigham
      > Young planned out the Salt Lake Valley, Cartesian coordinate system,
      > and the mountains are always to the east for a reference. Jerry and
      > Kate would have to try real hard to get lost in Salt Lake.
      > Ralph
      >
      >
      > On Fri, 1 Oct 2004 16:17:12 -0500, Shane <shane@t...> wrote:
      > > > Shane when you give or get directions do you do Right- Left or
      do you
      > > > do North-South etc. ? Serious question, really. And it might
      apply
      > >
      > > Both. It depends on the context... I will tend to use
      north/south when I
      > > can. What does it mean?
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > > Shane
      > >
    • Jerry Goller
      I use 2mm utility cord from Black Diamond. They, naturally, have a store in SLC. Jerry http://www.BackpackGearTest.org : the
      Message 2 of 14 , Oct 1, 2004
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        Message
        I use 2mm utility cord from Black Diamond. They, naturally, have a store in SLC.
        Jerry
         
         

        http://www.BackpackGearTest.org : the most comprehensive interactive gear reviews and tests on the planet.

         

        -----Original Message-----
        From: Dave Womble [mailto:dpwomble@...]
        Sent: Friday, October 01, 2004 2:13 PM
        To: hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com
        Subject: [Hammock Camping] Re: triptease

        That has been my experience with Kelty's triptease cord also.  It
        lights up like a lazer beam if you illuminate it from a distance but
        it doesn't really show up any better than a light colored guy line
        from up close.  I think it doesn't help the trip-over problem as much
        as it helps you find your way back in the dark.  It is excellent guy
        line in that it is strong, light weight and doesn't stretch much, if
        at all. 

        However, it is rather expensive.  Recently I have been using the less
        expensive 1/16" pulse line that Ed Speers recommends in his book.  Ed
        sells it and so does my local West Marine.  It is less expensive than
        the triptease cord, is neon orange or pink and is pretty much
        equivalent for guyline purposes the the triptease, except it doesn't
        light up when you illuminate it from a distance.  I think the
        triptease goes for around $15 for a 50 ft package and the 1/16" pulse
        line goes for around $22 for a 120 ft spool.

        Youngblood


        --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, "zippydooda" <zippydooda@y...>
        wrote:
        > REI has little pink flamingoes you can put on your tent/guy
        stakes. 
        > Not kidding. 
        >
        > Here's the deal.  They are kids.  They will trip on your guy lines
        no
        > matter what.  Sorry. 
        >
        > If you buy the flamingoes, they will step on them.
        >
        > If you want to see the reflective effect better, stand farther away
        > and hold the flashlight right up on the side of your head, next to
        > your eye.  The stuff they use is a highly directional reflector, as
        > you will see.
        >
        > Thanks for camping with kids. 
        >
        > Bill in Houston
        >
        >
        > --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, "neptunebeach"
        > <neptunebeach@c...> wrote:
        > > I use my HH Asym when camping with various scout groups.  The
        black
        > guys on
        > > the pullouts and fly seem to attract little feet as soon as the
        sun
        > goes
        > > down.  So I finally broke down and bought a length of Kelty
        > Triptease to
        > > replace the stock lines with something I expected to "glow-in-the-
        > dark" or
        > > at least reflect in the dark with a little flashlight light,
        which
        > is
        > > omnipresent at scout outings.  To my amazement, this triptease
        > doesn't seem
        > > to be any more reflective than any other similarly colored line. 
        > In fact,
        > > comparing a piece of white standard line and the triptease in a
        > dark room, I
        > > can see the white much better.  Did I get defective triptease, or
        > do do I
        > > have the wrong expectations?  What do others do to mark the
        extent
        > of guy
        > > lines?
        > >
        > > Rick in FL


      • Dave Womble
        Shane, I don t worry to much about the 188 lb breaking strength. I figure that is new cord without knots or sharp bends-- like around tent stakes. It is
        Message 3 of 14 , Oct 2, 2004
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          Shane,

          I don't worry to much about the 188 lb breaking strength. I figure
          that is new cord without knots or sharp bends-- like around tent
          stakes. It is pretty light weight compared to comparable strength
          cord. Guyline stretch is a big issue for me when I use a tarp
          suspended above a hammock and I suspect that guyline stretch in
          general is proportional to the ratio of the loading on the guyline to
          the breaking strength of the guyline but I don't know for sure this
          is a big enough factor to be of concern.

          One biggy for me is that triptease (or spectra pulse cord) does not
          stretch like nylon cord when it gets wet. I have compared the slack
          with a roughly 8'x10' tarp I was using for my hammock by rigging it
          up one rainy night with braided nylon utility cord and the next rainy
          night with the low stretch triptease or spectra pulse line. The
          difference in the slack was dramatic. Now, this configuration used a
          lot of cord so it emphasised the stretch much more than what a tarp
          pitched for ground dwellers would experience. I think I tied it
          about 6 feet above the ground with trees spaced about 15'. I used
          three guylines on each side with about 7' of guyline to the ground
          stakes. I wished I had taken photos.

          Youngblood

          --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, "Shane" <shane@t...> wrote:
          > > Why don't you like triptease?
          >
          > I actually don't like it for several reasons, which I have noted
          from past
          > experience. One, it's too strong. With a breaking strength of 188
          lb (85
          > kg) it's stronger than any tarp's tear strength. Plain white nylon
          string
          > would work just fine, and has worked for me many times. Two, it's
          too
          > heavy. Again, inch for inch, white nylon string is lighter and
          every bit as
          > functional. Three, it's hard to see at night. Sure, it reflects
          your
          > flashlight or headlamp, but if you're like me and don't use a light
          while
          > you're stalking around in the dark, a plain white cord is a lot
          easier to
          > see. Four, it's too expensive.
          >
          > Shane
        • stumplug
          I don t use tie-outs on my HH Exp. in the common mode. I have an old small bore tent flexpole, five sections (ten feet) and bow it underneath, tying the
          Message 4 of 14 , Oct 2, 2004
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            I don't use tie-outs on my HH Exp. in the common mode. I have an old
            small bore tent flexpole, five sections (ten feet) and bow it
            underneath, tying the canopy to the top (near the ends) and the
            hammock ties about eighteen inches down. The obvious advantage is
            nothing to trip over and I enjoy the swinging sensation. In the wind
            it has a tendacy to 'kite' over so I take a tarp tie vertical to a
            stake on the windward side.
            Works for me and I know most hammock campers have an old tent or two
            in the shed.
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