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Re: Hurricane experiments

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  • Dave Womble
    ... silnylon ... reached 55 ... peg came ... tarp ... Bear, that is a good lesson about stakes and how lots of rain and/or wind can cause them to pull them
    Message 1 of 9 , Sep 30 9:13 AM
      --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, "David Chinell"
      <dchinell@m...> wrote:
      > 1. Windblown tarp: Set up in the back yard during Jeanne. 7 x 9
      silnylon
      > tarp with grommets, pitched on diagonal. Stayed out until gusts
      reached 55
      > mph. The flatter the tarp, the less impact the gusts had. Upwind
      peg came
      > out twice, due in part to sandy soil in yard. Pitched very low, the
      tarp
      > gave good coverage even from gust-blown rain.
      >
      >

      Bear, that is a good lesson about stakes and how lots of rain and/or
      wind can cause them to pull them out. I would think that tying off
      to roots, branches, etc would be in order if possible as well as
      placing logs or rocks on the line where the stake enters the ground.

      Youngblood
    • Rick
      ... Headache on the second night of camping is often due to - caffine withdrawl - dehydration I find that having my feet higher at night, makes them feel
      Message 2 of 9 , Oct 1, 2004
        jonas4321@... wrote:

        >On the two nights last weekend I was in the hammock, the first night my
        >feet were a little low, and I slid down a bit. The next night, I had
        >raised the foot end, but I think I got it a little too high, as I woke up
        >with a headache (and I don't usually wake with a headache). Anyone else
        >experience this?
        >
        >
        >
        >
        Headache on the second night of camping is often due to
        - caffine withdrawl
        - dehydration

        I find that having my feet higher at night, makes them feel better in
        the morning.

        Risk
      • Rick
        ... Dave, What Jackie did not mention is that vascular headaches don t happen to everyone. If a hiker has a history of vascular headaches, then watching out
        Message 3 of 9 , Oct 1, 2004
          Dave Womble wrote:

          >Jackie, that is very useful. Thanks for sharing it with us. It is
          >cetainly something that I am glad to be aware of so that I can
          >quickly recognise the condition and try to remedy it quickly if it
          >ever happens. Sounds a little like one thing leads to another, leads
          >to another, but elevated feet can be a major contributer to the
          >domino effect and it is necessary to immediately remove the pressure
          >on your cranium by quit elevating the feet if something doesn't feel
          >right in your head. I have experienced domino effect problems that
          >get out of hand when I have scuba dived in the past and the immediate
          >remedy is of course, to get to the surface to relief the symtoms
          >associated with the increased pressure.
          >
          >Youngblood
          >
          >--- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, "jackie lynn evans"
          >
          >
          Dave,

          What Jackie did not mention is that vascular headaches don't happen to
          everyone. If a hiker has a history of vascular headaches, then watching
          out for putting the feet too high is a great idea. If the camper has
          not had them (migranes, etc.) then it is unlikely that sleeping with the
          feet slightly elevated will give a hammock camper their first vascular
          headache.

          Risk, MD
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