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Bugnet Tube a Success

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  • jonas4321@juno.com
    I have been thinking of how I wanted to add bug netting to my hammock, and I decided to try out making a tube that was drawn closed at both ends. This not only
    Message 1 of 3 , Sep 28, 2004
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      I have been thinking of how I wanted to add bug netting to my hammock,
      and I decided to try out making a tube that was drawn closed at both
      ends. This not only gave me coverage from above and below, it also gave
      me an unexpected benefit of a bug net that I could use with most any
      hammock that I might make in the future. This hammock is a ZHammock
      design (thank you Risk!). The only change I made to that design was that
      I used a double sheet bend to connect the webbing to the hammock.

      The tube is two 4-yard lengths of 58" wide noseeum from OWF (it could
      have been a little shorter, but the hammock is 3 yards long, so I gave
      myself a little extra length). I sewed these two pieces together along
      the long sides to form a tube. I then sewed over a 3/4" channel hem at
      each end with two buttonholes as reinforcement for where the drawstring
      exited the channel. I used 1/8" smooth nylon drawstring cord and basic
      cordlocks. Next time, I'll choose a smaller diameter cord, 1/8" was
      unnecessarily thick. Even flat cord would have been better.

      I draw the foot end closed before I get in the hammock, then get in and
      pull the tube up over my head and draw it closed on the head end from
      inside. I used a separate ridgeline rope for the bug net, and I was
      pleased that the closed end seemed to slide automatically to the point
      where the hammock webbing and ridgeline crossed, making a fairly tight
      seal. I suppose I could stuff a bit of clothing in the ends if the bugs
      were really on the offensive.

      Getting it closed at the head end was relatively easy, as the ridgeline
      would pull down just enough for me to draw it tightly closed. It slid
      away from me a little towards the point where the ridgeline and webbing
      crossed after I let it go, but the drawcord was within easy reach in the
      morning, and it didn't take much acrobatics to undo (which is good,
      because I'm no acrobat).

      This isn't a very good ultralight design, but it does what I was looking
      to do. I put some pics of the setup and the hammock end-knot up on a
      Jonas4321 album in the Photos section.

      Thanks to all the experienced folks for the advice along the way on this
      design. Now to tackle the cold weather issues...

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    • Paul Kaercher
      ... I suppose I could stuff a bit of clothing in the ends if the bugs were really on the offensive. You might try treating the ends of your bug net with
      Message 2 of 3 , Sep 28, 2004
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        --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, jonas4321@j... wrote:
        I suppose I could stuff a bit of clothing in the ends if the bugs
        were really on the offensive.

        You might try treating the ends of your bug net with
        permethrin. Any insects trying to get through the small
        opening will likely die in the attempt.
        Permethrin is also repellent so depending on the size of the hole in
        the ends of the tube, and the amount of chemical you can get to stick
        to the netting, you may find that those little flying teeth won't
        even try
        and get through.

        Paul
      • Rick
        This sounds like a great solution for black flies! It would also be good for those areas with particularly offensive noseeums or mosquitoes. Risk
        Message 3 of 3 , Oct 1, 2004
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          This sounds like a great solution for black flies! It would also be
          good for those areas with particularly offensive noseeums or mosquitoes.

          Risk

          jonas4321@... wrote:

          >I have been thinking of how I wanted to add bug netting to my hammock,
          >and I decided to try out making a tube that was drawn closed at both
          >ends.
          >
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