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Re: Where does your hammock fail?

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  • Dave Womble
    ... was ... I have been using three half-hitches as a constrictor knot to attach rope to my hammocks for about 1.5 years and have not noticed any failure. I
    Message 1 of 2 , Sep 1, 2004
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      --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, "docteric" <docteric@y...>
      wrote:
      > I've been doing a few experiements with different knots to tie the
      > hanging lines to the hammock fabric. I've been using weak fabric to
      > to see which knots rip the fabric more.
      >
      > An interesting finding was that whenever the hammock failed - it
      was
      > always just below the knot. What have other people's experiences
      > been? I'm wondering if that is the weak spot, maybe we could
      > reinforce it with a double layer (like the stress points on a tarp)
      > and then use a lighter fabric (like 1.1).
      >
      > What do you folks with more experience than me (that means almost
      > all of you) think?

      I have been using three half-hitches as a constrictor knot to attach
      rope to my hammocks for about 1.5 years and have not noticed any
      failure. I used 0.25" hollow braid polypropylene rope attached to a
      two-layer hammock of two pieces of 1.1 oz rip-stop nylon for most of
      that time. (As a side note about durability and what worked and what
      didn't; I used #16 snap fasteners reinforced with 1" squares of
      Bondex pressure sensitive nylon to attach the two edges of the 1.1 oz
      rip-stop nylon and never had a failure with that either. I used 6
      equally spaced snaps on each side and I used red squares on one side
      of the hammock and blue squares on the other side to easily identify
      what was what. I was pleased with how this scheme worked.)

      I would suspect that the kind of rope that you use would also effect
      failures. Smaller diameter rope with abrasive surface would figure
      to do the most damage. Attachment knots that slip or slide would
      also figure to contribute to fabric failure.

      Since I have not noticed any failure or heard of others experiencing
      failures, I am not to worried about the fabric at this point. I do,
      however, keep my eye on the rope I use because I am concerned about
      its long term durability. However, don't get me wrong, I am glad to
      see someone working on that issue and am interested in whatever you
      uncover.

      Youngblood
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