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Deet on HH ultralight?

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  • gr8fuldan2
    Hi everybody! I guess I can t put DEET on just anything. Anyone used it successfully on the ultralight? thanks! Dan
    Message 1 of 8 , Aug 31, 2004
      Hi everybody! I guess I can't put DEET on just anything. Anyone used
      it successfully on the ultralight? thanks! Dan
    • mindrehab248
      ... DEET wouldn t be effective on the body of the hammock (it would be on YOUR body, however). Permethrin is what you want to put on the hammock and netting. I
      Message 2 of 8 , Aug 31, 2004
        --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, "gr8fuldan2" <popeslope@h...>
        wrote:
        > Hi everybody! I guess I can't put DEET on just anything. Anyone used
        > it successfully on the ultralight? thanks! Dan

        DEET wouldn't be effective on the body of the hammock (it would be on
        YOUR body, however). Permethrin is what you want to put on the
        hammock and netting. I used permethrin spray on my Speer hammock in
        Panama, and it worked great!

        I found this on http://www.travmed.com/trip_prep/insect_permethrin.htm

        What is the difference between DEET and permethrin? Can I use them
        interchangeably?
        DEET and permethrin complement one another, but they are not
        interchangeable. DEET works to repel biting insects, by blocking the
        receptors on an insect's antennae which help it home in on its host.
        Permethrin is not an insect repellent. It works as a contact
        insecticide, stunning or killing insects that come in contact with
        it.

        Can I use DEET and permethrin together, or is the combination
        unnecessary?
        When maximum protection against insect bites is needed or desired,
        the ideal solution is to use a combination of DEET on exposed skin,
        and wear permethrin-treated clothing. An extended-duration DEET
        insect repellent (Ultrathon®) and permethrin-treated clothing is
        the
        standard personal protection system used by the U.S. military
        deployed in areas of the world where insect-borne disease is a real
        threat. One field study showed that the use of both of these products
        provided 99.9% protection against mosquito bites, in an environment
        where unprotected persons received an average of 1,188 bites per
        hour!


        Patrick
      • ra1@imrisk.com
        I strongly advise against applying DEET to the nylon fabric. I even advise against getting it on the fabric by accident from your skin. It seems to be a
        Message 3 of 8 , Aug 31, 2004
          I strongly advise against applying DEET to the nylon fabric. I even advise
          against getting it on the fabric by accident from your skin. It seems to be a
          solvent for nylon and will at least weaken the fabric. It may cause the fabric
          to fail.

          There are too many other ways to avoid being bitten by bugs.

          Risk

          Quoting gr8fuldan2 <popeslope@...>:

          > Hi everybody! I guess I can't put DEET on just anything. Anyone used
          > it successfully on the ultralight? thanks! Dan
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          > Yahoo! Groups Links
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
        • Bill Fornshell
          What do you suggest, stay home. I would think that an Outdoor Gear Maker that uses a material that will not hold up to Bug-Dope needs to rethink their
          Message 4 of 8 , Aug 31, 2004
            What do you suggest, stay home. I would think that an
            Outdoor Gear Maker that uses a material that will not
            hold up to Bug-Dope needs to rethink their material
            choice. Use the DEET and if you have a material
            problem with your HH take it back or send it back it
            is not worth having. Bill in Texas

            -- ra1@... wrote:

            > I strongly advise against applying DEET to the nylon
            > fabric. I even advise
            > against getting it on the fabric by accident from
            > your skin. It seems to be a
            > solvent for nylon and will at least weaken the
            > fabric. It may cause the fabric
            > to fail.
            >
            > There are too many other ways to avoid being bitten
            > by bugs.
            >
            > Risk
            >
            > Quoting gr8fuldan2 <popeslope@...>:
            >
            > > Hi everybody! I guess I can't put DEET on just
            > anything. Anyone used
            > > it successfully on the ultralight? thanks! Dan
            >



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          • Shane
            ... Have you experienced failures? DEET will dissolve plastic instantly, but is non-reactive with nylon. I have sprayed DEET all over nylon webbing and other
            Message 5 of 8 , Aug 31, 2004
              > I strongly advise against applying DEET to the nylon fabric. I even
              > advise against getting it on the fabric by accident from your skin. It
              > seems to be a solvent for nylon and will at least weaken the fabric. It
              > may cause the fabric to fail.

              Have you experienced failures? DEET will dissolve plastic instantly, but is
              non-reactive with nylon. I have sprayed DEET all over nylon webbing and
              other nylon things. I frequently lay (both inside and outside) of my HH
              after freshly spraying DEET on myself. I have never had any failure.

              It isn't effective on the hammock - permethrin should be used - but I don't
              think it will hurt a nylon hammock.

              Shane
            • Dave Womble
              ... instantly, but is ... webbing and ... my HH ... failure. ... I don t ... Shane, thanks for pointing that out. I had it figured the same way Rick did and
              Message 6 of 8 , Aug 31, 2004
                > Have you experienced failures? DEET will dissolve plastic
                instantly, but is
                > non-reactive with nylon. I have sprayed DEET all over nylon
                webbing and
                > other nylon things. I frequently lay (both inside and outside) of
                my HH
                > after freshly spraying DEET on myself. I have never had any
                failure.
                >
                > It isn't effective on the hammock - permethrin should be used - but
                I don't
                > think it will hurt a nylon hammock.
                >
                > Shane

                Shane, thanks for pointing that out. I had it figured the same way
                Rick did and wouldn't let anyone who had recently applied DEET near
                my hammocks. I do realize that you did a lot of work with bug
                repellents a couple of years back when you did the BGT test on Travel
                Medicines(?) products. I often refer folks that have questions to
                your reports (as well as the others).

                Youngblood
              • Risk
                Shane certainly has much more experience than I have. I almost never use DEET, and he needs to down in LA! Given the advice I found with a simple search of
                Message 7 of 8 , Aug 31, 2004
                  Shane certainly has much more experience than I have. I almost never
                  use DEET, and he needs to down in LA!

                  Given the advice I found with a simple search of the net, I think that
                  using DEET on skin and then crawling into a nylon hammock is probably
                  OK for the nylon. I could not find evidence about polyester and DEET.
                  The thread I use when building hammocks is 100 percent polyester. I
                  am not sure what the HH builders use.

                  I had been taught this trail legend many times... but when I went out
                  just now to investigate, Shane is completely correct according to the
                  majority of sources I found about nylon:

                  Rick

                  *****************

                  DEET can damage some plastics and synthetic fabrics, such as nylon and
                  acetate, so be careful not to damage clothing or camping equipment.
                  http://chemistry.about.com/cs/howthingswork/a/aa042703a.htm

                  DEET can damage plastics, synthetic fabrics, leather, and painted or
                  varnished materials, so keep it away from eyeglasses, watch crystals,
                  walls and furniture. DEET doesn't harm nylon or natural fibers, such
                  as cotton or wool.
                  http://www.cnn.com/HEALTH/library/FL/00083.html

                  Never put DEET based repellants on plastics, acetate, spandex or
                  nylon, as the DEET can damage these materials. Spraying your pack and
                  jacket or rain gear, is not a good idea.
                  http://www.outdoorplaces.com/Features/Hiking/repel/repel.htm

                  Do not apply DEET formulations on or near plastics, acetate,rayon,
                  Spandex, synthetic fabrics (other than nylon), furniture finishes,
                  leather, watch crystals, and painted or varnished surfaces. Plastic
                  glass frames and goggles should be protected from DEET applications.
                  Car finishes and interiors also may be damaged by DEET. It will not
                  damage nylon, cotton, or wool fabrics.
                  http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/BODY_IG122

                  (Diethyltoluamide will not damage clothing materials, such as cotton,
                  wool, or nylon. However, it may damage acetate, rayon, spandex, or
                  some other synthetic materials.
                  http://www.drugs.com/cons/DEET.html

                  ******************

                  --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, "Shane" <shane@t...> wrote:
                  > > I strongly advise against applying DEET to the nylon fabric. I even
                  > > advise against getting it on the fabric by accident from your
                  skin. It
                  > > seems to be a solvent for nylon and will at least weaken the
                  fabric. It
                  > > may cause the fabric to fail.
                  >
                  > Have you experienced failures? DEET will dissolve plastic
                  instantly, but is
                  > non-reactive with nylon. I have sprayed DEET all over nylon webbing and
                  > other nylon things. I frequently lay (both inside and outside) of my HH
                  > after freshly spraying DEET on myself. I have never had any failure.
                  >
                  > It isn't effective on the hammock - permethrin should be used - but
                  I don't
                  > think it will hurt a nylon hammock.
                  >
                  > Shane
                • Risk
                  I tested a piece of 100 percent polyester thread with 100% DEET. I applied it and let it soak for several hours. The thread was not any weaker for the
                  Message 8 of 8 , Sep 4, 2004
                    I tested a piece of 100 percent polyester thread with 100% DEET. I
                    applied it and let it soak for several hours. The thread was not any
                    weaker for the exposure to the DEET.

                    Rick

                    --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, "Risk" <ra1@i...> wrote:
                    > Shane certainly has much more experience than I have. I almost never
                    > use DEET, and he needs to down in LA!
                    >
                    > Given the advice I found with a simple search of the net, I think that
                    > using DEET on skin and then crawling into a nylon hammock is probably
                    > OK for the nylon. I could not find evidence about polyester and DEET.
                    > The thread I use when building hammocks is 100 percent polyester. I
                    > am not sure what the HH builders use.
                    >
                    > I had been taught this trail legend many times... but when I went out
                    > just now to investigate, Shane is completely correct according to the
                    > majority of sources I found about nylon:
                    >
                    > Rick
                    >
                    > *****************
                    >
                    > DEET can damage some plastics and synthetic fabrics, such as nylon and
                    > acetate, so be careful not to damage clothing or camping equipment.
                    > http://chemistry.about.com/cs/howthingswork/a/aa042703a.htm
                    >
                    > DEET can damage plastics, synthetic fabrics, leather, and painted or
                    > varnished materials, so keep it away from eyeglasses, watch crystals,
                    > walls and furniture. DEET doesn't harm nylon or natural fibers, such
                    > as cotton or wool.
                    > http://www.cnn.com/HEALTH/library/FL/00083.html
                    >
                    > Never put DEET based repellants on plastics, acetate, spandex or
                    > nylon, as the DEET can damage these materials. Spraying your pack and
                    > jacket or rain gear, is not a good idea.
                    > http://www.outdoorplaces.com/Features/Hiking/repel/repel.htm
                    >
                    > Do not apply DEET formulations on or near plastics, acetate,rayon,
                    > Spandex, synthetic fabrics (other than nylon), furniture finishes,
                    > leather, watch crystals, and painted or varnished surfaces. Plastic
                    > glass frames and goggles should be protected from DEET applications.
                    > Car finishes and interiors also may be damaged by DEET. It will not
                    > damage nylon, cotton, or wool fabrics.
                    > http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/BODY_IG122
                    >
                    > (Diethyltoluamide will not damage clothing materials, such as cotton,
                    > wool, or nylon. However, it may damage acetate, rayon, spandex, or
                    > some other synthetic materials.
                    > http://www.drugs.com/cons/DEET.html
                    >
                    > ******************
                    >
                    > --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, "Shane" <shane@t...> wrote:
                    > > > I strongly advise against applying DEET to the nylon fabric. I even
                    > > > advise against getting it on the fabric by accident from your
                    > skin. It
                    > > > seems to be a solvent for nylon and will at least weaken the
                    > fabric. It
                    > > > may cause the fabric to fail.
                    > >
                    > > Have you experienced failures? DEET will dissolve plastic
                    > instantly, but is
                    > > non-reactive with nylon. I have sprayed DEET all over nylon
                    webbing and
                    > > other nylon things. I frequently lay (both inside and outside) of
                    my HH
                    > > after freshly spraying DEET on myself. I have never had any failure.
                    > >
                    > > It isn't effective on the hammock - permethrin should be used - but
                    > I don't
                    > > think it will hurt a nylon hammock.
                    > >
                    > > Shane
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