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Newbee Questions

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  • Chuck Kichline
    I lucked into a practically unused Clark Deluxe last week, so I m finally going to get to try some hammock camping! I ve only seen two other hammocks in my
    Message 1 of 7 , Aug 18 8:46 AM
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      I lucked into a practically unused Clark Deluxe last week, so I'm
      finally going to get to try some hammock camping! I've only seen two
      other hammocks in my camping experience, so this is pretty new to me.
      I've been checking out all the sites I can, but have a couple of
      questions that I bet are easy answer:

      Ridge Line: My hammock came with two short lines with bungees for the
      ridge. It looks like maybe Clark shows a single line from tree to
      tree with both bungees. Seems like a better idea to me, is it?

      Drip Rings: Clark shows drip rings. When I last looked at hammocks,
      drip srings were how to control water running down the line. Are drip
      rings better? Is it something you could cobble out of PVC pipe
      fittings if they are?

      Rainfly: Down here in Texas, you better have the rainfly ready at
      night. I was thinking that leaving it hooked at the foot and having a
      loop and spare bungee on the ridge line might be a good idea. Is
      there a better idea?

      TIA
      Chuck Kichline
    • ra1@imrisk.com
      ... Two ideas: - set the tarp up with the stakes for one side stowed and the lines hooked to the other side. If weather threatens, it is easy to put the extra
      Message 2 of 7 , Aug 18 10:32 AM
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        Quoting Chuck Kichline <chuck_kichline@...>:

        >
        > Rainfly: Down here in Texas, you better have the rainfly ready at
        > night. I was thinking that leaving it hooked at the foot and having a
        > loop and spare bungee on the ridge line might be a good idea. Is
        > there a better idea?
        >
        > TIA
        > Chuck Kichline
        >
        Two ideas:

        - set the tarp up with the stakes for one side stowed and the lines hooked to
        the other side. If weather threatens, it is easy to put the extra one or two
        stakes in on the unprotected side. I hang the stakes from the tree loop for
        that purpose.

        -or-

        -use 1.5 inch diameter hammock tubes (snakeskins) for the tarp. Attach it to
        the two trees. If a storm comes up, put the stakes out. An advantage of this
        is that the tarp stows in its own water proof container the next morning.

        Rick
      • Dave Womble
        ... two ... me. ... the ... drip ... a ... Chuck, It has been a while since I have had my hands on a Clark Hammock. What I recall about the bungee is that it
        Message 3 of 7 , Aug 18 10:46 AM
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          --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, "Chuck Kichline"
          <chuck_kichline@y...> wrote:
          > I lucked into a practically unused Clark Deluxe last week, so I'm
          > finally going to get to try some hammock camping! I've only seen
          two
          > other hammocks in my camping experience, so this is pretty new to
          me.
          > I've been checking out all the sites I can, but have a couple of
          > questions that I bet are easy answer:
          >
          > Ridge Line: My hammock came with two short lines with bungees for
          the
          > ridge. It looks like maybe Clark shows a single line from tree to
          > tree with both bungees. Seems like a better idea to me, is it?
          >
          > Drip Rings: Clark shows drip rings. When I last looked at hammocks,
          > drip srings were how to control water running down the line. Are
          drip
          > rings better? Is it something you could cobble out of PVC pipe
          > fittings if they are?
          >
          > Rainfly: Down here in Texas, you better have the rainfly ready at
          > night. I was thinking that leaving it hooked at the foot and having
          a
          > loop and spare bungee on the ridge line might be a good idea. Is
          > there a better idea?
          >
          > TIA
          > Chuck Kichline

          Chuck,

          It has been a while since I have had my hands on a Clark Hammock.
          What I recall about the bungee is that it attached to the tarp when
          the tarp was used and that you had to do a little re-connect when the
          tarp wasn't used. Seems like Clark has the manual on his web site,
          that should show it pretty well.

          Drip stings may not work as well as you think IF the rope allows
          water to get under the surface. I use hollow braid polypropylene
          rope on my homemade Speer Hammock and that is the case with it. What
          I did was to use butterfly knots that act as both a drip stopper and
          an attachment point for my bugnet's shockcorded ridgeline. Clark's
          drip ring will also stop water from seeping under the surface of a
          hollow braid rope. I have had mine in several severe all night rains
          and nothing got past the butterfly knots. Basically, what the
          Clark's drip ring and the butterfly knot does is to force all water
          to the surface where the downward portion of the loop (or knot) uses
          gravity to force the water to drip to the ground... ie, water won't
          flow upward if given the option to drip to the ground.

          Youngblood
        • docteric
          ... when ... the ... site, ... What ... and ... Clark s ... rains ... water ... uses ... won t ... Youngblood, You mentioned a butterfly knot in your post.
          Message 4 of 7 , Aug 18 5:21 PM
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            You wrote:

            > Chuck,
            >
            > It has been a while since I have had my hands on a Clark Hammock.
            > What I recall about the bungee is that it attached to the tarp
            when
            > the tarp was used and that you had to do a little re-connect when
            the
            > tarp wasn't used. Seems like Clark has the manual on his web
            site,
            > that should show it pretty well.
            >
            > Drip stings may not work as well as you think IF the rope allows
            > water to get under the surface. I use hollow braid polypropylene
            > rope on my homemade Speer Hammock and that is the case with it.
            What
            > I did was to use butterfly knots that act as both a drip stopper
            and
            > an attachment point for my bugnet's shockcorded ridgeline.
            Clark's
            > drip ring will also stop water from seeping under the surface of a
            > hollow braid rope. I have had mine in several severe all night
            rains
            > and nothing got past the butterfly knots. Basically, what the
            > Clark's drip ring and the butterfly knot does is to force all
            water
            > to the surface where the downward portion of the loop (or knot)
            uses
            > gravity to force the water to drip to the ground... ie, water
            won't
            > flow upward if given the option to drip to the ground.
            >
            > Youngblood

            Youngblood,

            You mentioned a butterfly knot in your post. I'm about to make a
            Speer type hammock and plan to use polypro line instead of webbing.
            So could you tell me how to make the butterfly knot?

            Also, how did you secure the line to the hammock? I am weighing the
            pros and cons of using a whipping knot, a nail knot, or a prussik.
            Also considering a water knot but I'm not sure the nylon has enough
            grip to it.

            Let me know how you did this - it'll be real helpful

            Docteric
          • Dave Womble
            ... webbing. ... the ... Sure, the butterfly knot I use is this one: http://brmrg.med.virginia.edu/knots/FTL/butrfly.html . I tie it about a foot from the
            Message 5 of 7 , Aug 18 5:53 PM
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              > Youngblood,
              >
              > You mentioned a butterfly knot in your post. I'm about to make a
              > Speer type hammock and plan to use polypro line instead of
              webbing.
              > So could you tell me how to make the butterfly knot?
              >
              > Also, how did you secure the line to the hammock? I am weighing
              the
              > pros and cons of using a whipping knot, a nail knot, or a prussik.
              > Also considering a water knot but I'm not sure the nylon has enough
              > grip to it.
              >
              > Let me know how you did this - it'll be real helpful
              >
              > Docteric

              Sure, the butterfly knot I use is this one:
              http://brmrg.med.virginia.edu/knots/FTL/butrfly.html . I tie it
              about a foot from the hammock, which is where Ed Speer attaches his D-
              ring. I use Ed Speer's overhand knot to gather the ends of the
              hammock fabric and tie the rope to the hammock fabric using three
              half-hitches. (This link is for 2 half-hitches, I add a 3rd half-
              hitch to keep the first two half-hitches in place:
              http://www.bunganutlake.org/double-halfhitch-knot.htm .) The three
              half-hitches constrict under tension and will not slip over the
              overhand knot in the fabric. I use a bowline with quick release to
              tie off to the trees, just like the one Clark recommends (
              http://www.junglehammock.com/tips.php ).
            • docteric
              ... his D- ... three ... to ... Dave, Thanks for the links for the knots. They re going to come in handy. One more question. I worry that a bowline would
              Message 6 of 7 , Aug 19 6:17 PM
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                --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, "Dave Womble" <dpwomble@y...>
                wrote:
                > Sure, the butterfly knot I use is this one:
                > http://brmrg.med.virginia.edu/knots/FTL/butrfly.html . I tie it
                > about a foot from the hammock, which is where Ed Speer attaches
                his D-
                > ring. I use Ed Speer's overhand knot to gather the ends of the
                > hammock fabric and tie the rope to the hammock fabric using three
                > half-hitches. (This link is for 2 half-hitches, I add a 3rd half-
                > hitch to keep the first two half-hitches in place:
                > http://www.bunganutlake.org/double-halfhitch-knot.htm .) The
                three
                > half-hitches constrict under tension and will not slip over the
                > overhand knot in the fabric. I use a bowline with quick release
                to
                > tie off to the trees, just like the one Clark recommends (
                > http://www.junglehammock.com/tips.php ).

                Dave,

                Thanks for the links for the knots. They're going to come in
                handy. One more question. I worry that a bowline would slide down
                since it doesn't clinch the tree. I'm assuming that's never
                happened to you?

                Eric
              • Dave Womble
                ... Eric, Usually the portion of the loop near the bowline itself will slide an inch or so when I weight the hammock but that is because of the downward force
                Message 7 of 7 , Aug 19 7:37 PM
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                  > Dave,
                  >
                  > Thanks for the links for the knots. They're going to come in
                  > handy. One more question. I worry that a bowline would slide down
                  > since it doesn't clinch the tree. I'm assuming that's never
                  > happened to you?
                  >
                  > Eric

                  Eric,

                  Usually the portion of the loop near the bowline itself will slide an
                  inch or so when I weight the hammock but that is because of the
                  downward force on the rope. A lot of that will depend on how loose
                  the loop around the tree is and how smooth the bark is, but it hasn't
                  been a problem for me with the trees that I have used. I tie the
                  loop almost snug and it usually allows me to adjust the height
                  slightly by working the bowline loop up or down the tree if I find I
                  don't like how I initially tied it. Obviously though, as you point
                  out, if the loop is real loose it will simply slide down the tree
                  unless tension is constantly applied to it. There are several things
                  about hammocks that are different from tent or tarp camping and these
                  have a little bit of a 'learning curve' associated with them. Tieing
                  them off to trees is one of them that most of us hammock hangers had
                  to go through.

                  Dave
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