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Re: [Hammock Camping] points of chafe on hammocks

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  • jonas4321@juno.com
    Risk had said that he had not noticed any deformation or deterioration on his hammock using 3/32 T-100 rope, so maybe this isn t an issue. I am not an
    Message 1 of 17 , Aug 11 9:37 AM
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      Risk had said that he had not noticed any deformation or deterioration on
      his hammock using 3/32" T-100 rope, so maybe this isn't an issue. I am
      not an ultralight-er, so it's less important to me to save ounces- I'll
      probably use webbing from tree to hammock, at least for now.

      If someone was concerned about both, why not have a tree-hugger and a
      hammock-hugger? Use webbing for each, and I'd vote for the double sheet
      bend on the hammock (very elegant and simple), perhaps with a sewn-in
      double-layer loop.

      This would let you use the ultralight cord of your choice with just a bit
      more complexity.

      Just a thought.

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    • rambler4466
      ... deterioration on ... I am ... I ll ... and a ... sheet ... in ... just a bit ... Another way to make a tree-hugger would be to take a 6 piece of webbing.
      Message 2 of 17 , Aug 11 10:32 AM
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        --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, jonas4321@j... wrote:
        > Risk had said that he had not noticed any deformation or
        deterioration on
        > his hammock using 3/32" T-100 rope, so maybe this isn't an issue.
        I am
        > not an ultralight-er, so it's less important to me to save ounces-
        I'll
        > probably use webbing from tree to hammock, at least for now.
        >
        > If someone was concerned about both, why not have a tree-hugger
        and a
        > hammock-hugger? Use webbing for each, and I'd vote for the double
        sheet
        > bend on the hammock (very elegant and simple), perhaps with a sewn-
        in
        > double-layer loop.
        >
        > This would let you use the ultralight cord of your choice with
        just a bit
        > more complexity.

        Another way to make a tree-hugger would be to take a 6' piece of
        webbing. Sew it together at the ends, and you have a 3' loop that
        becomes the tree hugger. It would have two lines of webbing going
        around the tree, but the hanging cord could be placed at a different
        spot each time to lessen the chaffing. The tree-hugger would look
        like the strapping webs that climbers use to hang caribiners. You
        could just buy one of those if you do not have time to sew. (My
        sewing machine has a tough time with the bottom side thread in thick
        webbing.) Rambler> >
        ________________________________________________________________
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      • Ralph Oborn
        It seems to me if you spread out the webbing on the back of the tree you would be distributing the load in two spots. What wn elegant solution!!! You could
        Message 3 of 17 , Aug 15 6:34 AM
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          It seems to me if you spread out the webbing on the back of the tree
          you would be distributing the load in two spots. What wn elegant
          solution!!! You could use smaller (thinner) web without hurting the
          tree. You wold be moving the wear point around. You could put one
          loop through the other end to stabilize etc. WOW epiphany. And I bet
          there might be a weight savings too.

          Ralph Oborn


          >
          > Another way to make a tree-hugger would be to take a 6' piece of
          > webbing. Sew it together at the ends, and you have a 3' loop that
          > becomes the tree hugger. It would have two lines of webbing going
          > around the tree, but the hanging cord could be placed at a
          different
          > spot each time to lessen the chaffing. The tree-hugger would look
          > like the strapping webs that climbers use to hang caribiners. You
          > could just buy one of those if you do not have time to sew. (My
          > sewing machine has a tough time with the bottom side thread in
          thick
          > webbing.) Rambler> >
          > ________________________________________________________________
          > > The best thing to hit the Internet in years - Juno SpeedBand!
          > > Surf the Web up to FIVE TIMES FASTER!
          > > Only $14.95/ month - visit www.juno.com to sign up today!
        • rambler4466
          ... The tree-hugger purchased from Hennessey a few years ago was 1 webbing, 3 long. From photos at their website, it now appears they use seat-belt wide
          Message 4 of 17 , Aug 15 8:01 AM
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            --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, "Ralph Oborn" <polecatpop@y...>
            wrote:
            > It seems to me if you spread out the webbing on the back of the tree
            > you would be distributing the load in two spots. What wn elegant
            > solution!!! You could use smaller (thinner) web without hurting the
            > tree. You wold be moving the wear point around. You could put one
            > loop through the other end to stabilize etc. WOW epiphany. And I bet
            > there might be a weight savings too.
            >
            > Ralph Oborn
            >
            >
            > >
            > > Another way to make a tree-hugger would be to take a 6' piece of
            > > webbing. Sew it together at the ends, and you have a 3' loop that
            > > becomes the tree hugger. It would have two lines of webbing going
            > > around the tree, but the hanging cord could be placed at a
            > different
            > > spot each time to lessen the chaffing. The tree-hugger would look
            > > like the strapping webs that climbers use to hang caribiners. You
            > > could just buy one of those if you do not have time to sew. (My
            > > sewing machine has a tough time with the bottom side thread in
            > thick
            > > webbing.) Rambler> >

            The tree-hugger purchased from Hennessey a few years ago was 1"
            webbing, 3' long. From photos at their website, it now appears they
            use seat-belt wide webbing and perhaps longer than 3'. Note that
            Shane's tree huggers are 10' long which must allow double wraps on
            most trees. http://hennessyhammock.com/setup.htm
            > > ________________________________________________________________
            > > > The best thing to hit the Internet in years - Juno SpeedBand!
            > > > Surf the Web up to FIVE TIMES FASTER!
            > > > Only $14.95/ month - visit www.juno.com to sign up today!
          • dlfrost_1
            ... different ... thick ... They re generally called runners or slings. There s no need to sew--just use a water knot, it works fine. (Once human weight
            Message 5 of 17 , Aug 15 11:14 AM
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              --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, "rambler4466"
              <rambler4466@h...> wrote:
              > Another way to make a tree-hugger would be to take a 6' piece of
              > webbing. Sew it together at the ends, and you have a 3' loop that
              > becomes the tree hugger. It would have two lines of webbing going
              > around the tree, but the hanging cord could be placed at a
              different
              > spot each time to lessen the chaffing. The tree-hugger would look
              > like the strapping webs that climbers use to hang caribiners. You
              > could just buy one of those if you do not have time to sew. (My
              > sewing machine has a tough time with the bottom side thread in
              thick
              > webbing.) Rambler> >

              They're generally called "runners" or "slings."

              There's no need to sew--just use a water knot, it works fine. (Once
              human weight has been loaded on the knot cannot be untied, so
              consider such an arrangement to be permanant.)

              (I've settled on placing a small fixed loop at one end of the webbing
              and running the other end through that {after going around the tree,
              of course}, making sure that everything is snug up against the tree
              so there will be no slippage. You can go around smaller trees more
              than once if desired. The free end ties to the hammock line on my
              HH.)

              Doug Frost
            • jonas4321@juno.com
              Doug Frost wrote ... I have used water knots a lot, and if you tuck a loop made from the end of the strap into the knot, it will still hold very well and you
              Message 6 of 17 , Aug 15 3:30 PM
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                Doug Frost wrote
                >
                > There's no need to sew--just use a water knot, it works fine. (Once
                >
                > human weight has been loaded on the knot cannot be untied, so
                > consider such an arrangement to be permanant.)
                >

                I have used water knots a lot, and if you tuck a loop made from the end
                of the strap into the knot, it will still hold very well and you can use
                the loop to pull the knot apart. The water knot holds in poly webbing
                much better than nylon webbing, so if you use the water knot with nylon
                webbing, especially tubular webbing (my favorite), tie a half hitch or
                two after you tuck the loop, you'll sleep much better knowing it ain't
                gonna slip.

                ________________________________________________________________
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              • ciyd01
                ... (Once ... Not true, really. I ve weighted many a water knot and they all come undone. this is especially true on tubular nylon, the stuff climbers use.
                Message 7 of 17 , Aug 16 8:08 AM
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                  > There's no need to sew--just use a water knot, it works fine.
                  (Once
                  > human weight has been loaded on the knot cannot be untied, so
                  > consider such an arrangement to be permanant.)

                  Not true, really. I've weighted many a water knot and they all come
                  undone. this is especially true on tubular nylon, the stuff climbers
                  use. To loosen the knot, roll it between the palms of your hand like
                  you're rolling bread dough into a long ribbon. This will loosen the
                  knot enough to untie it. also, always make sure that the water knot
                  is neat - that means that the webbing never gets rolled, folded or
                  twisted - as a sloppy knot causes wekaness in the webbing and could
                  lead to premature failure.

                  kelli
                • jonas4321@juno.com
                  I have noticed that wet water knots are much harder to untie than dry water knots, but still possible. Tucking the loop in the knot makes all of them easier to
                  Message 8 of 17 , Aug 16 8:40 AM
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                    I have noticed that wet water knots are much harder to untie than dry
                    water knots, but still possible. Tucking the loop in the knot makes all
                    of them easier to untie (see my previous response).

                    Is a dry water knot an oxymoron?

                    On Mon, 16 Aug 2004 15:08:43 -0000 "ciyd01" <ciyd@...> writes:
                    >
                    > > There's no need to sew--just use a water knot, it works fine.
                    > (Once
                    > > human weight has been loaded on the knot cannot be untied, so
                    > > consider such an arrangement to be permanant.)
                    >
                    > Not true, really. I've weighted many a water knot and they all come
                    >
                    > undone. this is especially true on tubular nylon, the stuff
                    > climbers
                    > use. To loosen the knot, roll it between the palms of your hand
                    > like
                    > you're rolling bread dough into a long ribbon. This will loosen the
                    >
                    > knot enough to untie it. also, always make sure that the water knot
                    >
                    > is neat - that means that the webbing never gets rolled, folded or
                    > twisted - as a sloppy knot causes wekaness in the webbing and could
                    >
                    > lead to premature failure.
                    >
                    > kelli
                    >
                    >
                    >
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                  • ciyd01
                    ... No, but Ground Sleeper is ;-) ciyd (sorry, couldn t resist)
                    Message 9 of 17 , Aug 16 8:59 AM
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                      > Is a dry water knot an oxymoron?

                      No, but "Ground Sleeper" is ;-)

                      ciyd (sorry, couldn't resist)
                    • dlfrost_1
                      ... come ... climbers ... like ... the ... knot ... I know that it s so because I do the same thing to get em apart as well. But wrestling with my gear is not
                      Message 10 of 17 , Aug 16 12:29 PM
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                        --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, "ciyd01" <ciyd@a...> wrote:
                        > > There's no need to sew--just use a water knot, it works fine.
                        > (Once
                        > > human weight has been loaded on the knot cannot be untied, so
                        > > consider such an arrangement to be permanant.)
                        >
                        > Not true, really. I've weighted many a water knot and they all
                        come
                        > undone. this is especially true on tubular nylon, the stuff
                        climbers
                        > use. To loosen the knot, roll it between the palms of your hand
                        like
                        > you're rolling bread dough into a long ribbon. This will loosen
                        the
                        > knot enough to untie it. also, always make sure that the water
                        knot
                        > is neat - that means that the webbing never gets rolled, folded or
                        > twisted - as a sloppy knot causes wekaness in the webbing and could
                        > lead to premature failure.
                        >
                        > kelli

                        I know that it's so because I do the same thing to get em apart as
                        well. But wrestling with my gear is not something I want to do every
                        morning either.

                        (Of course, you can always tuck something into the knot for later
                        removal, as pointed out by Ed in his book or by jonas4321 a few
                        messages ago.)

                        Doug Frost
                      • Adrnlnjnky
                        I have noticed that wet water knots are much harder to untie than dry water knots, but still possible. Tucking the loop in the knot makes all of them easier to
                        Message 11 of 17 , Aug 16 12:57 PM
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                          I have noticed that wet water knots are much harder to untie than dry
                          water knots, but still possible. Tucking the loop in the knot makes all
                          of them easier to untie (see my previous response).
                          _________________________________________________-

                          when wet the webbing stretches out. When you use webbing in the water
                          it is important to get it wet before securing gear. otherwise when it
                          gets wet it stretches and everything will be loose. When the knot
                          gets wet it tightens up and then dries. It is a neat little trick to
                          get your knot wet when trying to untie it. If you tied the knot with
                          wet webbing and pulled it tight you will probably have to get it wet
                          to untie the knot anyway.

                          That being said why are you tieing and untieing water knots every day.
                          If you are going to use it like a sling leave the webbing tied all
                          the time. If you are worried about chaffing the rope and weight is of
                          only mild concern here are a few options. 1. use a Caribbean. 2. use
                          a repel ring. (This is solid metal ring climbers use when repelling to
                          avoid friction breaks in the webbing. If you are cheap then go
                          looking at the top of climbing areas. I have left a few behind in my
                          day. (P.S. don't use the webbing attached to it, you have no idea how
                          old or used it is). You can tie your knot with two of the rings and
                          place one on either side of the tree.

                          I personally have found I like to use seat belt webbing with a loop at
                          either end. I run one end of the webbing through the other and
                          connect the hammock with a Caribbean. You can skip the beaner but I
                          carry a few of them with me all the time anyway so I already have them
                          along and I like the reduced friction on my gear.

                          Tom


                          ----- Original Message -----
                          From: dlfrost_1 <dlfrost@...>
                          Date: Mon, 16 Aug 2004 19:29:40 -0000
                          Subject: Re: [Hammock Camping] points of chafe on hammocks
                          To: hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com

                          --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, "ciyd01" <ciyd@a...> wrote:
                          > > There's no need to sew--just use a water knot, it works fine.
                          > (Once
                          > > human weight has been loaded on the knot cannot be untied, so
                          > > consider such an arrangement to be permanant.)
                          >
                          > Not true, really. I've weighted many a water knot and they all
                          come
                          > undone. this is especially true on tubular nylon, the stuff
                          climbers
                          > use. To loosen the knot, roll it between the palms of your hand
                          like
                          > you're rolling bread dough into a long ribbon. This will loosen
                          the
                          > knot enough to untie it. also, always make sure that the water
                          knot
                          > is neat - that means that the webbing never gets rolled, folded or
                          > twisted - as a sloppy knot causes wekaness in the webbing and could
                          > lead to premature failure.
                          >
                          > kelli

                          I know that it's so because I do the same thing to get em apart as
                          well. But wrestling with my gear is not something I want to do every
                          morning either.

                          (Of course, you can always tuck something into the knot for later
                          removal, as pointed out by Ed in his book or by jonas4321 a few
                          messages ago.)

                          Doug Frost






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                          --
                          Tom Peltier

                          Pura Vida
                        • Ralph Oborn
                          Would slings from REI etc work as tree huggers? 5000 lb Ralph ... dry ... makes all ... water ... when it ... to ... with ... wet ... day. ... is of ... use
                          Message 12 of 17 , Aug 16 7:38 PM
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                            Would slings from REI etc work as tree huggers? 5000 lb

                            Ralph


                            --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, Adrnlnjnky <Adrnlnjnky@g...>
                            wrote:
                            > I have noticed that wet water knots are much harder to untie than
                            dry
                            > water knots, but still possible. Tucking the loop in the knot
                            makes all
                            > of them easier to untie (see my previous response).
                            > _________________________________________________-
                            >
                            > when wet the webbing stretches out. When you use webbing in the
                            water
                            > it is important to get it wet before securing gear. otherwise
                            when it
                            > gets wet it stretches and everything will be loose. When the knot
                            > gets wet it tightens up and then dries. It is a neat little trick
                            to
                            > get your knot wet when trying to untie it. If you tied the knot
                            with
                            > wet webbing and pulled it tight you will probably have to get it
                            wet
                            > to untie the knot anyway.
                            >
                            > That being said why are you tieing and untieing water knots every
                            day.
                            > If you are going to use it like a sling leave the webbing tied all
                            > the time. If you are worried about chaffing the rope and weight
                            is of
                            > only mild concern here are a few options. 1. use a Caribbean. 2.
                            use
                            > a repel ring. (This is solid metal ring climbers use when
                            repelling to
                            > avoid friction breaks in the webbing. If you are cheap then go
                            > looking at the top of climbing areas. I have left a few behind in
                            my
                            > day. (P.S. don't use the webbing attached to it, you have no idea
                            how
                            > old or used it is). You can tie your knot with two of the rings
                            and
                            > place one on either side of the tree.
                            >
                            > I personally have found I like to use seat belt webbing with a
                            loop at
                            > either end. I run one end of the webbing through the other and
                            > connect the hammock with a Caribbean. You can skip the beaner but
                            I
                            > carry a few of them with me all the time anyway so I already have
                            them
                            > along and I like the reduced friction on my gear.
                            >
                            > Tom
                            >
                            >
                            > ----- Original Message -----
                            > From: dlfrost_1 <dlfrost@a...>
                            > Date: Mon, 16 Aug 2004 19:29:40 -0000
                            > Subject: Re: [Hammock Camping] points of chafe on hammocks
                            > To: hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com
                            >
                            > --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, "ciyd01" <ciyd@a...> wrote:
                            > > > There's no need to sew--just use a water knot, it works
                            fine.
                            > > (Once
                            > > > human weight has been loaded on the knot cannot be untied, so
                            > > > consider such an arrangement to be permanant.)
                            > >
                            > > Not true, really. I've weighted many a water knot and they all
                            > come
                            > > undone. this is especially true on tubular nylon, the stuff
                            > climbers
                            > > use. To loosen the knot, roll it between the palms of your
                            hand
                            > like
                            > > you're rolling bread dough into a long ribbon. This will
                            loosen
                            > the
                            > > knot enough to untie it. also, always make sure that the water
                            > knot
                            > > is neat - that means that the webbing never gets rolled, folded
                            or
                            > > twisted - as a sloppy knot causes wekaness in the webbing and
                            could
                            > > lead to premature failure.
                            > >
                            > > kelli
                            >
                            > I know that it's so because I do the same thing to get em apart
                            as
                            > well. But wrestling with my gear is not something I want to do
                            every
                            > morning either.
                            >
                            > (Of course, you can always tuck something into the knot for later
                            > removal, as pointed out by Ed in his book or by jonas4321 a few
                            > messages ago.)
                            >
                            > Doug Frost
                            >
                            >
                            >
                            >
                            >
                            >
                            > Yahoo! Groups Sponsor
                            >
                            > ADVERTISEMENT
                            >
                            >
                            > ________________________________
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                            >
                            > To visit your group on the web, go to:
                            > http://groups.yahoo.com/group/hammockcamping/
                            >
                            > To unsubscribe from this group, send an email to:
                            > hammockcamping-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com
                            >
                            > Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to the Yahoo! Terms of
                            Service.
                            >
                            >
                            >
                            > --
                            > Tom Peltier
                            >
                            > Pura Vida
                          • Adrnlnjnky
                            Absolutely. Those are climbing slings designed to absorb the energy of a lead fall. They are plenty strong and I imagine would work just fine. I still
                            Message 13 of 17 , Aug 16 9:42 PM
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                              Absolutely. Those are climbing slings designed to absorb the energy
                              of a lead fall. They are plenty strong and I imagine would work just
                              fine. I still think I prefer to wrap the tree but I'm going to have
                              to play around with the sling ploy. It's just a matter of having a
                              long enough sling. I'm thinking this would be more of a problem on
                              larger trees. Thin trees would accommodate the sling very nicely.




                              ----- Original Message -----
                              From: Ralph Oborn <polecatpop@...>
                              Date: Tue, 17 Aug 2004 02:38:37 -0000
                              Subject: Re: [Hammock Camping] points of chafe on hammocks
                              To: hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com

                              Would slings from REI etc work as tree huggers? 5000 lb

                              Ralph


                              --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, Adrnlnjnky <Adrnlnjnky@g...>
                              wrote:
                              > I have noticed that wet water knots are much harder to untie than
                              dry
                              > water knots, but still possible. Tucking the loop in the knot
                              makes all
                              > of them easier to untie (see my previous response).
                              > _________________________________________________-
                              >
                              > when wet the webbing stretches out. When you use webbing in the
                              water
                              > it is important to get it wet before securing gear. otherwise
                              when it
                              > gets wet it stretches and everything will be loose. When the knot
                              > gets wet it tightens up and then dries. It is a neat little trick
                              to
                              > get your knot wet when trying to untie it. If you tied the knot
                              with
                              > wet webbing and pulled it tight you will probably have to get it
                              wet
                              > to untie the knot anyway.
                              >
                              > That being said why are you tieing and untieing water knots every
                              day.
                              > If you are going to use it like a sling leave the webbing tied all
                              > the time. If you are worried about chaffing the rope and weight
                              is of
                              > only mild concern here are a few options. 1. use a Caribbean. 2.
                              use
                              > a repel ring. (This is solid metal ring climbers use when
                              repelling to
                              > avoid friction breaks in the webbing. If you are cheap then go
                              > looking at the top of climbing areas. I have left a few behind in
                              my
                              > day. (P.S. don't use the webbing attached to it, you have no idea
                              how
                              > old or used it is). You can tie your knot with two of the rings
                              and
                              > place one on either side of the tree.
                              >
                              > I personally have found I like to use seat belt webbing with a
                              loop at
                              > either end. I run one end of the webbing through the other and
                              > connect the hammock with a Caribbean. You can skip the beaner but
                              I
                              > carry a few of them with me all the time anyway so I already have
                              them
                              > along and I like the reduced friction on my gear.
                              >
                              > Tom
                              >
                              >
                              > ----- Original Message -----
                              > From: dlfrost_1 <dlfrost@a...>
                              > Date: Mon, 16 Aug 2004 19:29:40 -0000
                              > Subject: Re: [Hammock Camping] points of chafe on hammocks
                              > To: hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com
                              >
                              > --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, "ciyd01" <ciyd@a...> wrote:
                              > > > There's no need to sew--just use a water knot, it works
                              fine.
                              > > (Once
                              > > > human weight has been loaded on the knot cannot be untied, so
                              > > > consider such an arrangement to be permanant.)
                              > >
                              > > Not true, really. I've weighted many a water knot and they all
                              > come
                              > > undone. this is especially true on tubular nylon, the stuff
                              > climbers
                              > > use. To loosen the knot, roll it between the palms of your
                              hand
                              > like
                              > > you're rolling bread dough into a long ribbon. This will
                              loosen
                              > the
                              > > knot enough to untie it. also, always make sure that the water
                              > knot
                              > > is neat - that means that the webbing never gets rolled, folded
                              or
                              > > twisted - as a sloppy knot causes wekaness in the webbing and
                              could
                              > > lead to premature failure.
                              > >
                              > > kelli
                              >
                              > I know that it's so because I do the same thing to get em apart
                              as
                              > well. But wrestling with my gear is not something I want to do
                              every
                              > morning either.
                              >
                              > (Of course, you can always tuck something into the knot for later
                              > removal, as pointed out by Ed in his book or by jonas4321 a few
                              > messages ago.)
                              >
                              > Doug Frost
                              >
                              >
                              >
                              >
                              >
                              >
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                              >
                              >
                              > --
                              > Tom Peltier
                              >
                              > Pura Vida





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                            • ciyd01
                              They should. If they ll hold a climber after a fall, they should hold a hammocker. The only thing you ll have to watch is the width; some of the spectra
                              Message 14 of 17 , Aug 16 9:58 PM
                              • 0 Attachment
                                They should. If they'll hold a climber after a fall, they should
                                hold a hammocker. The only thing you'll have to watch is the width;
                                some of the spectra slings are less than 1" wide. I've been thinking
                                of adding a daisy chain to my setup so that I don't have to keep re-
                                tieing the knot after the initial stretch.

                                ciyd

                                --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, "Ralph Oborn"
                                <polecatpop@y...> wrote:
                                > Would slings from REI etc work as tree huggers? 5000 lb
                                >
                                > Ralph
                              • Rick
                                ... They work, but not as well as when made out of a material which stretches less - they are nylon The shorter they are, and the stronger they are, the less
                                Message 15 of 17 , Aug 17 3:27 AM
                                • 0 Attachment
                                  Adrnlnjnky wrote:

                                  >Absolutely. Those are climbing slings designed to absorb the energy
                                  >of a lead fall. They are plenty strong and I imagine would work just
                                  >fine. I still think I prefer to wrap the tree but I'm going to have
                                  >to play around with the sling ploy. It's just a matter of having a
                                  >long enough sling. I'm thinking this would be more of a problem on
                                  >larger trees. Thin trees would accommodate the sling very nicely.
                                  >
                                  >
                                  >
                                  >
                                  >----- Original Message -----
                                  >From: Ralph Oborn <polecatpop@...>
                                  >Date: Tue, 17 Aug 2004 02:38:37 -0000
                                  >Subject: Re: [Hammock Camping] points of chafe on hammocks
                                  >To: hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com
                                  >
                                  > Would slings from REI etc work as tree huggers? 5000 lb
                                  >
                                  > Ralph
                                  >
                                  >
                                  They work, but not as well as when made out of a material which
                                  stretches less - they are nylon The shorter they are, and the stronger
                                  they are, the less they stretch. They are also considerably over
                                  designed. It is like making a chair out of oak 4x4s. It works, just
                                  not very elegantly.

                                  Risk
                                • Ralph Oborn
                                  Thanks, what got my attention is: 1) you would have different wear points every time you hang. 2) the strength 5000 lb 3) by doubling and seperating you
                                  Message 16 of 17 , Aug 17 7:39 AM
                                  • 0 Attachment
                                    Thanks, what got my attention is:
                                    1) you would have different wear points every time you hang.
                                    2) the strength 5000 lb
                                    3) by doubling and seperating you distribute the bark compression
                                    4) cost is pretty low
                                    5) I could make my own with a permanent water knot
                                    Ralph

                                    --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, Rick <ra1@i...> wrote:
                                    > Adrnlnjnky wrote:
                                    >
                                    > >Absolutely. Those are climbing slings designed to absorb the
                                    energy
                                    > >of a lead fall. They are plenty strong and I imagine would work
                                    just
                                    > >fine. I still think I prefer to wrap the tree but I'm going to
                                    have
                                    > >to play around with the sling ploy. It's just a matter of having
                                    a
                                    > >long enough sling. I'm thinking this would be more of a problem
                                    on
                                    > >larger trees. Thin trees would accommodate the sling very nicely.
                                    > >
                                    > >
                                    > >
                                    > >
                                    > >----- Original Message -----
                                    > >From: Ralph Oborn <polecatpop@y...>
                                    > >Date: Tue, 17 Aug 2004 02:38:37 -0000
                                    > >Subject: Re: [Hammock Camping] points of chafe on hammocks
                                    > >To: hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com
                                    > >
                                    > > Would slings from REI etc work as tree huggers? 5000 lb
                                    > >
                                    > > Ralph
                                    > >
                                    > >
                                    > They work, but not as well as when made out of a material which
                                    > stretches less - they are nylon The shorter they are, and the
                                    stronger
                                    > they are, the less they stretch. They are also considerably over
                                    > designed. It is like making a chair out of oak 4x4s. It works,
                                    just
                                    > not very elegantly.
                                    >
                                    > Risk
                                  • Adrnlnjnky
                                    If your going to make your own I would suggest that you purchase wider webbing. this is better for the tree even if you double it. I m thinking at least 1
                                    Message 17 of 17 , Aug 20 9:21 AM
                                    • 0 Attachment
                                      If your going to make your own I would suggest that you purchase wider
                                      webbing. this is better for the tree even if you double it. I'm
                                      thinking at least 1" tubular webbing for this type of set up.

                                      Tom



                                      ----- Original Message -----
                                      From: Ralph Oborn <polecatpop@...>
                                      Date: Tue, 17 Aug 2004 14:39:17 -0000
                                      Subject: Re: [Hammock Camping] points of chafe on hammocks
                                      To: hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com

                                      Thanks, what got my attention is:
                                      1) you would have different wear points every time you hang.
                                      2) the strength 5000 lb
                                      3) by doubling and seperating you distribute the bark compression
                                      4) cost is pretty low
                                      5) I could make my own with a permanent water knot
                                      Ralph

                                      --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, Rick <ra1@i...> wrote:
                                      > Adrnlnjnky wrote:
                                      >
                                      > >Absolutely. Those are climbing slings designed to absorb the
                                      energy
                                      > >of a lead fall. They are plenty strong and I imagine would work
                                      just
                                      > >fine. I still think I prefer to wrap the tree but I'm going to
                                      have
                                      > >to play around with the sling ploy. It's just a matter of having
                                      a
                                      > >long enough sling. I'm thinking this would be more of a problem
                                      on
                                      > >larger trees. Thin trees would accommodate the sling very nicely.
                                      > >
                                      > >
                                      > >
                                      > >
                                      > >----- Original Message -----
                                      > >From: Ralph Oborn <polecatpop@y...>
                                      > >Date: Tue, 17 Aug 2004 02:38:37 -0000
                                      > >Subject: Re: [Hammock Camping] points of chafe on hammocks
                                      > >To: hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com
                                      > >
                                      > > Would slings from REI etc work as tree huggers? 5000 lb
                                      > >
                                      > > Ralph
                                      > >
                                      > >
                                      > They work, but not as well as when made out of a material which
                                      > stretches less - they are nylon The shorter they are, and the
                                      stronger
                                      > they are, the less they stretch. They are also considerably over
                                      > designed. It is like making a chair out of oak 4x4s. It works,
                                      just
                                      > not very elegantly.
                                      >
                                      > Risk





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                                      Tom Peltier

                                      Pura Vida
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