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points of chafe on hammocks

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  • rambler4466
    -- On tree-huggers at the edges of the looped ends. The hanging cord cuts through the edges. This happened on a Hennessy tree- hugger made of 1 webbing.
    Message 1 of 2 , Aug 11, 2004
      -- On tree-huggers at the edges of the looped ends. The hanging
      cord cuts through the edges. This happened on a Hennessy tree-
      hugger made of 1" webbing. Luckily this area of any tree-hugger is
      easily visible and usually looked at as one sets up the hammock.
      Solution ideas: sew in an extra layer of webbing into the loop -
      or - before sewing the loop closed, run the webbing through the
      middle of a short piece of tubular webbing -or- use a piece of
      rubber tubing with just enough diameter to run the hanging cord
      through so it will act as chafe prevention in the loop. The problem
      of chaffing in the loop will be exaggerated (as Jonas points out) as
      the hanging cord being used becomes thinner in diameter.

      Another area of chafe and wear will be under tightly tied whipping
      and at points where thin hanging cord is wrapped or tied to the
      hammock. These areas are usually not easy to see without undoing
      ties and probably last many hangings before becoming issues to wory
      about. When using line thinner than 1" webbing here is a solution.

      Make the material used to tie onto the hammock out of 1" webbing
      instead of using the thin line. Start with a piece of 1" webbing
      about 20" long. With chaulk or some marker visible on webbing, draw
      about a 8" line down the middle of the webbing starting at one end
      on one side only. (Tubular webbing often has a thread line down the
      middle of one side which can be used.) Using the end with the mark
      make about a 6" loop. You want the loop to have a twist in it which
      is what the visible line down the middle is for. With the marked
      line facing up, come back with the end of the webbing that will make
      your loop to the pint where you will sew it closed. Have the chaulk
      line facing up and this will create a twist in the loop. (You might
      have made such a loop on tie-out points on your tarps.) To explain
      this move again, in your left hand holding the staright piece of
      webbing, the chaulk line will be on top, as you make the loop with
      the end of the webbing in your other hand, the chaulk line will also
      be up and visible. Sew the webbing together to make the loop. Now,
      on the other end of the webbing sew another smaller loop big enough
      to pass your hanging line through, no need for any twist. Take the
      end with the smaller loop and pass it through the big loop as if you
      were making a lasso. Okay, Cowboy, lasso the hammock end and pull
      tight.

      You now have a piece of webbing tightl;y tied to the hammock with a
      small loop hanging on the other end. Now attach the hanging
      rope/line to that smaller loop using a double sheet bend. In the
      following illustration (Thanks Troop )the blue color represents
      the webbing loop and the red is yout hanging line. Sorry for no
      pics, my digital cam is under repair! Happy hanging.
    • rambler4466
      ... sheet bend. ... and the red you hanging line. (Thanks Troop 59) ... click on knots Scroll down to Double Sheet Bend
      Message 2 of 2 , Aug 11, 2004
        --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, "rambler4466"
        <rambler4466@h...> wrote:
        > -- attach the hanging
        > Attach the hanging rope/line to that smaller loop using a double
        sheet bend.
        > In the illustration the blue color represents your webbing loop
        and the red you hanging line. (Thanks Troop 59)
        > http://www.bsatroop59.org/Knots/knots_doublesheet.htm

        click on "knots'" Scroll down to "Double Sheet Bend"
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