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Re: More knots...

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  • hogn8r2004
    ... Those are the only two ways I know, but I would like to know the way you are thinking of. Maybe a link or something so I can see it. ... midshipman s
    Message 1 of 4 , Jul 28, 2004
      > There's still a faster way.

      Those are the only two ways I know, but I would like to know the way
      you are thinking of. Maybe a link or something so I can see it.

      > Also, there's something wrong with your tautline (AKA the
      midshipman's hitch): it's backwards.

      Right you are again! It's amazing, I can tie that hitch in my sleep,
      but not when I take pictures of it, go figure. I have deleted the
      faulty instructions and will post the correct way soon.

      Is there anything else I screwed up? :)
    • Matthew Takeda
      ... I haven t seen it anywhere on the www. I was taught a number of instant knots when I started sailing, including an instand clove hitch, an instant figure
      Message 2 of 4 , Jul 29, 2004
        hogn8r2004 wrote:
        > > There's still a faster way.
        >
        >Those are the only two ways I know, but I would like to know the way
        >you are thinking of. Maybe a link or something so I can see it.

        I haven't seen it anywhere on the www. I was taught a number of "instant"
        knots when I started sailing, including an instand clove hitch, an instant
        figure of eight, and this one. Minor variations of this particular
        technique make a bowline, double bowline (AKA mountaineering bowline, not
        the bowline on a bight), multiple loop bowline (AKA bowline on a coil,
        again, not on a bight), sheet bend, double sheet bend, and a weaver's knot.
        It's dead simple to demonstrate, but a bit difficult to explain. I'll try,
        but don't expect to get it without a demonstration. The following paragraph
        may be difficult to follow:

        Making the bowline relies on a principle used in one of the variations of
        the weaver's knot: if you insert the end of a line through the loop of a
        slippery overhand knot, then capsize the knot, the result is a weaver's
        knot. If you insert the end of a line going the other way through the loop,
        you get a sheet bend. If you do the same thing and the end you insert is
        the bitter end of the same line the slippery overhand knot is tied in, the
        result is a bowline. The overhand knot is tied in an unusual way: you lay
        the line across the palm of your non-dominant hand, from bottom to top,
        around the back, up the palm again, crossing over towards your thumb, and
        back down the back. Then, you tuck the bitter end down through the loop at
        the bottom of your hand, from the finger side towards the wrist. The loop
        of the slippery knot is the part going over the top of your hand, towards
        your fingers. Slip the bitter end through this loop, going from the thumb
        side towards the finger side, then slip the whole mess off of your hand and
        pull on the standing part to collapse the knot.

        It sounds complicated, but it only takes a second to do. Maybe I should
        take some pictures.

        > > Also, there's something wrong with your tautline (AKA the
        >midshipman's hitch): it's backwards.
        >
        >Right you are again! It's amazing, I can tie that hitch in my sleep,
        >but not when I take pictures of it, go figure. I have deleted the
        >faulty instructions and will post the correct way soon.

        Isn't that the way it always goes? You're perfect until someone is
        watching, then you do something dumb. One of life's little joys.

        >Is there anything else I screwed up? :)

        Not that I can see. You do know that there are already dozens of good knot
        sites on the www, don't you?

        Matthew Takeda
        the JOAT
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