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Re: Sealing Nylon

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  • uluheman
    I ve used a mixture of silicone sealant (clear) and mineral spirits (NOT fuel!) for years to seal seams on tents, tarps, etc. I squirt a quarter cup or so of
    Message 1 of 8 , Jul 22 12:00 PM
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      I've used a mixture of silicone sealant (clear) and mineral spirits
      (NOT fuel!) for years to seal seams on tents, tarps, etc. I squirt a
      quarter cup or so of sealant into a jar (later to be disposed of),
      add a bit of spirits, and then mix slowly with a stick. When it gets
      pretty well blended, then I add more spirits and mix again.
      Eventually, it gets to the consistency of Elmer's glue. I then paint
      the mixture onto the seams with a narrow disposable brush, working it
      in well. It takes a few hours to dry. It's best to apply onto a taut
      surface, i.e., a tent or tarp that is set up as it will be used in
      the field.

      Brandon in Honolulu


      --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, jonas4321@j... wrote:
      > I read several posts about using a mixture of silicone sealant and
      > Coleman fuel as a seam sealer when building tarps out of silnylon.
      Has
      > anyone tried using this mixture to waterproof an entire piece of
      existing
      > nylon equipment? I am thinking of a couple of perfect-size stuff
      sacks
      > that I have that need extra waterproofing. One of them is used a
      fair
      > amount, the other I could take a risk and experiment with. I was
      thinking
      > of creating the mixture then using a spray bottle (disposable,
      obviously)
      > to apply it to the nylon, but perhaps it's too thick to spray when
      mixed
      > properly (I have only read about it, not done it yet).
      >
      > Any thoughts? Thanks!
      >
      > J
      >
      > ________________________________________________________________
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    • Dave Womble
      ... a ... gets ... paint ... it ... taut ... I did the exact same thing, until I discovered that if I used an empty jelly jar, salsa jar, etc that had a good
      Message 2 of 8 , Jul 22 12:46 PM
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        --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, "uluheman" <UluheMan@h...>
        wrote:
        > I've used a mixture of silicone sealant (clear) and mineral spirits
        > (NOT fuel!) for years to seal seams on tents, tarps, etc. I squirt
        a
        > quarter cup or so of sealant into a jar (later to be disposed of),
        > add a bit of spirits, and then mix slowly with a stick. When it
        gets
        > pretty well blended, then I add more spirits and mix again.
        > Eventually, it gets to the consistency of Elmer's glue. I then
        paint
        > the mixture onto the seams with a narrow disposable brush, working
        it
        > in well. It takes a few hours to dry. It's best to apply onto a
        taut
        > surface, i.e., a tent or tarp that is set up as it will be used in
        > the field.
        >
        > Brandon in Honolulu
        >

        I did the exact same thing, until I discovered that if I used an
        empty jelly jar, salsa jar, etc that had a good tight lid... then,
        instead of stirring, I could just shake the jar for a minute or so
        and get a good mixture.

        Youngblood
      • Rick
        ... I think it might work... but it not very expensive to buy professionally made silicone impregnated ripstop. If the stuff sacks are already waterproofed
        Message 3 of 8 , Jul 22 7:49 PM
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          jonas4321@... wrote:

          >I read several posts about using a mixture of silicone sealant and
          >Coleman fuel as a seam sealer when building tarps out of silnylon. Has
          >anyone tried using this mixture to waterproof an entire piece of existing
          >nylon equipment? I am thinking of a couple of perfect-size stuff sacks
          >that I have that need extra waterproofing. One of them is used a fair
          >amount, the other I could take a risk and experiment with. I was thinking
          >of creating the mixture then using a spray bottle (disposable, obviously)
          >to apply it to the nylon, but perhaps it's too thick to spray when mixed
          >properly (I have only read about it, not done it yet).
          >
          >Any thoughts? Thanks!
          >
          >J
          >
          >_
          >
          I think it might work... but it not very expensive to buy professionally
          made silicone impregnated ripstop. If the stuff sacks are already
          waterproofed with polyurethane coating, the silicone will just sluff
          off. It should only be tried on silicone treated fabric.

          Rick
        • jonas4321@juno.com
          Well, the one stuff sack that I can afford to mess with (and toss if it doesn t work) isn t waterproofed at all, so it will make a good test. I ll mix some up
          Message 4 of 8 , Jul 23 4:25 AM
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            Well, the one stuff sack that I can afford to mess with (and toss if it
            doesn't work) isn't waterproofed at all, so it will make a good test.
            I'll mix some up this weekend and give it a rip. I'll post the results.

            I agree that silnylon is pretty inexpensive (Thru-Hiker seems to have a
            very inexpensive kit that will make several stuff sacks), it's just that
            the two stuff sacks I am referring to are *just* the right size for their
            use, I'd love to keep them and not make new ones if I can improve their
            "waterproofness". I use plastic bag liners in them now because they are
            not waterproof.

            This past April, when I pulled my sleeping bag from its stuff sack, I
            discovered (to my horror) that the plastic bag was wadded up at the
            bottom (I must have lost all concentration when packing my gear).
            Unfortunately, it was 45 degrees and pouring, and water had run down the
            sides of my pack, which had a rain cover on it, and had soaked my
            sleeping bag in this non-waterproof stuff sack. That night (in my
            hammock), I did discover that my EMS bag with synthetic insulation was
            actually quite warm even when very wet, which was interesting. And
            fortunate!

            On Thu, 22 Jul 2004 22:49:18 -0400 Rick <ra1@...> writes:
            > jonas4321@... wrote:
            >
            > >I read several posts about using a mixture of silicone sealant and
            > >Coleman fuel as a seam sealer when building tarps out of silnylon.
            > Has
            > >anyone tried using this mixture to waterproof an entire piece of
            > existing
            > >nylon equipment? I am thinking of a couple of perfect-size stuff
            > sacks
            > >that I have that need extra waterproofing. One of them is used a
            > fair
            > >amount, the other I could take a risk and experiment with. I was
            > thinking
            > >of creating the mixture then using a spray bottle (disposable,
            > obviously)
            > >to apply it to the nylon, but perhaps it's too thick to spray when
            > mixed
            > >properly (I have only read about it, not done it yet).
            > >
            > >Any thoughts? Thanks!
            > >
            > >J
            > >
            > >_
            > >
            > I think it might work... but it not very expensive to buy
            > professionally
            > made silicone impregnated ripstop. If the stuff sacks are already
            > waterproofed with polyurethane coating, the silicone will just sluff
            >
            > off. It should only be tried on silicone treated fabric.
            >
            > Rick
            >
            >
            >
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          • Dave Womble
            Jonas, I think lining your sleeping bag s stuff sack with a plastic garbage bag is the best way to keep it dry... but like you pointed out, the sleeping bag
            Message 5 of 8 , Jul 23 4:57 AM
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              Jonas, I think lining your sleeping bag's stuff sack with a plastic
              garbage bag is the best way to keep it dry... but like you pointed
              out, the sleeping bag has to actually be inside the plastic garbage
              bag. I won't worry so much about sealing the stuff sack, just be
              more careful when you stuff it.

              Youngblood

              --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, jonas4321@j... wrote:
              > Well, the one stuff sack that I can afford to mess with (and toss
              if it
              > doesn't work) isn't waterproofed at all, so it will make a good
              test.
              > I'll mix some up this weekend and give it a rip. I'll post the
              results.
              >
              > I agree that silnylon is pretty inexpensive (Thru-Hiker seems to
              have a
              > very inexpensive kit that will make several stuff sacks), it's just
              that
              > the two stuff sacks I am referring to are *just* the right size for
              their
              > use, I'd love to keep them and not make new ones if I can improve
              their
              > "waterproofness". I use plastic bag liners in them now because they
              are
              > not waterproof.
              >
              > This past April, when I pulled my sleeping bag from its stuff sack,
              I
              > discovered (to my horror) that the plastic bag was wadded up at the
              > bottom (I must have lost all concentration when packing my gear).
              > Unfortunately, it was 45 degrees and pouring, and water had run
              down the
              > sides of my pack, which had a rain cover on it, and had soaked my
              > sleeping bag in this non-waterproof stuff sack. That night (in my
              > hammock), I did discover that my EMS bag with synthetic insulation
              was
              > actually quite warm even when very wet, which was interesting. And
              > fortunate!
              >
            • jonas4321@juno.com
              Youngblood, I agree. I always (er, um, well, ALMOST always, it seems) pack not just my sleeping bag inside plastic liners, I pack everything (clothes, etc.) in
              Message 6 of 8 , Jul 23 6:29 AM
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                Youngblood,

                I agree. I always (er, um, well, ALMOST always, it seems) pack not just
                my sleeping bag inside plastic liners, I pack everything (clothes, etc.)
                in plastic, even if I am "camping" in a hotel (force of habit from all
                the "setting a good example" when camping with Scouts). I keep plastic
                grocery bags in all my suitcases, duffel bags, backpacks, etc. for that
                purpose. We use a fabric car-top carrier on the van, and I go to what
                some might call extremes to keep things dry in it. Until the sleeping bag
                incident, I had been 100% dry.

                That's primarily why I want to add more water barriers by waterproofing
                my stuff sacks. I'll still use the plastic bag liners (I doubt I'll
                forget that again any time soon), I just want another layer of
                redundancy, for those moments when the unexpected happens (translation:
                when I do the unexpected!).

                J

                On Fri, 23 Jul 2004 11:57:00 -0000 "Dave Womble" <dpwomble@...>
                writes:
                > Jonas, I think lining your sleeping bag's stuff sack with a plastic
                > garbage bag is the best way to keep it dry... but like you pointed
                > out, the sleeping bag has to actually be inside the plastic garbage
                >
                > bag. I won't worry so much about sealing the stuff sack, just be
                > more careful when you stuff it.
                >
                > Youngblood
                >
                > --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, jonas4321@j... wrote:
                > > Well, the one stuff sack that I can afford to mess with (and toss
                >
                > if it
                > > doesn't work) isn't waterproofed at all, so it will make a good
                > test.
                > > I'll mix some up this weekend and give it a rip. I'll post the
                > results.
                > >
                > > I agree that silnylon is pretty inexpensive (Thru-Hiker seems to
                > have a
                > > very inexpensive kit that will make several stuff sacks), it's
                > just
                > that
                > > the two stuff sacks I am referring to are *just* the right size
                > for
                > their
                > > use, I'd love to keep them and not make new ones if I can improve
                >
                > their
                > > "waterproofness". I use plastic bag liners in them now because
                > they
                > are
                > > not waterproof.
                > >
                > > This past April, when I pulled my sleeping bag from its stuff
                > sack,
                > I
                > > discovered (to my horror) that the plastic bag was wadded up at
                > the
                > > bottom (I must have lost all concentration when packing my gear).
                > > Unfortunately, it was 45 degrees and pouring, and water had run
                > down the
                > > sides of my pack, which had a rain cover on it, and had soaked my
                > > sleeping bag in this non-waterproof stuff sack. That night (in my
                > > hammock), I did discover that my EMS bag with synthetic insulation
                >
                > was
                > > actually quite warm even when very wet, which was interesting.
                > And
                > > fortunate!
                > >
                >
                >
                >
                >
                > ------------------------ Yahoo! Groups Sponsor
                >
                >
                > Yahoo! Groups Links
                >
                >
                >
                >
                >
                >
                >

                ________________________________________________________________
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                Surf the Web up to FIVE TIMES FASTER!
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              • dlfrost_1
                ... waterproofing ... I agree with Youngblood that your problem is with technique rather than gear. You can minimize this sort of problem by making everything
                Message 7 of 8 , Jul 23 9:09 AM
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                  --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, jonas4321@j... wrote:
                  > That's primarily why I want to add more water barriers by
                  waterproofing
                  > my stuff sacks. I'll still use the plastic bag liners (I doubt I'll
                  > forget that again any time soon), I just want another layer of
                  > redundancy, for those moments when the unexpected happens
                  (translation:
                  > when I do the unexpected!).

                  I agree with Youngblood that your problem is with technique rather
                  than gear. You can minimize this sort of problem by making
                  everything habitual, at least as much as circumstances allow. That
                  way when you forget, autopilot saves ya.

                  Sylnylon isn't so good for packing because water under pressure (like
                  from contact with something wet) can slowly seep through. You might
                  consider applying urathane coating and using a lighter weight garbage
                  bag to compensate for the weight.

                  Best solution: When I switched to an ultralight down bag I didn't
                  want to worry about this, so I got an Outdoor Research "Advanced"
                  stuffsack, which has a a roll-down top and is waterproof for anything
                  save continuous immersion. The weight is less than the old garbage
                  bag & compression-stuffsack combo (3.5oz. vrs. 8oz.). Unfortunately
                  they don't make em large enough for synthetic bags, but you might
                  have a look in the yakking section of an outdoor store and see how
                  mich the lighter dry-bags weigh.

                  Doug Frost
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