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Re: [Hammock Camping] Re: ZHammock Page

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  • Rick
    Dave, I understand your question about weight. This is what I have done: - I cut the hammock cloth 1 foot shorter - I sew a rolled over hem, a quarter to a
    Message 1 of 5 , Jul 6 5:22 PM
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      Dave,

      I understand your question about weight.

      This is what I have done:
      - I cut the hammock cloth 1 foot shorter
      - I sew a rolled over hem, a quarter to a third of an inch wide (This
      shortens the hammock about an inch overall, when both ends are considered.)

      So I save a foot of hammock fabric length. I think this almost always
      will be a weight savings when adding back in the weight of whipping
      cord, but not much. For a double bottom hammock it saves two feet of
      length. That is where I got my 8 sq ft of savings (my hammocks, as you
      know, are 4 feet wide). Since a square yard is 9 sq ft, I figured I
      saved 8/9 of the 1.1 oz per sq yard of fabric.

      Seen another way, it can save 1/10 of the hammock material weight for my
      now 9 foot long material that was 10 feet long before. And I get the
      same interior room I had previously.

      Rick

      >
      >Thanks Rick, I can appreciate untying the overhand knots as I too
      >have wore out my fingers on occasion. I guess any weight savings
      >using the whipping instead of the overhand knot will be a function of
      >the weight of the fabric and the width of the hammock. I say this
      >because the whipping requires hemmed ends and the amount of fabric
      >taken up would seem to be independent of fabric weight and hammock
      >width, where as with the overhand knot the hemmed end is not
      >necessary and the amount of fabric taken up with the knot will change
      >depending on the fabric weight and hammock width. What I am getting
      >at is that for some combination of fabric weight and hammock width,
      >the whipping technique could actually result in a heavier hammock.
      >For instance, if you used a single layer of 1.1 oz material for a 4
      >foot wide hammock it is not obvious to me that the whipped ends would
      >result in a weight savings... actually, when I try to back that out
      >using your estimates I suspect that the whipping would result in a
      >slightly heavier hammock. Just trying to do a little figuring, and
      >thanks again for the info.
      >
      >Dave
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      >Yahoo! Groups Links
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