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Hammock End

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  • Doug Campbell
    I m curious, in hammock construction, why doesn t anyone here use the large hem on the ends with line threaded through it (kind of like the drawstring on a
    Message 1 of 7 , Jul 1, 2004
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      I'm curious, in hammock construction, why doesn't anyone here use the large hem on the ends with line threaded through it (kind of like the drawstring on a stuff sack)?
       
      Also, I repaired on old cloth hammock by putting a rolled seam on the ends of the hammock bed, gathering it up by Ed Speer's method, and using a Jug Sling Hitch on each end to provide the "whipping."  It also gave me a loop through which I attached my support rope.  It worked very nicely.  It would work great for Ralph's blue tarps!
       
      Doug Campbell


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    • Mirage
      ... the large hem on the ends with line threaded through it (kind of like the drawstring on a stuff sack)? Doug, I have made two hammocks this way and here is
      Message 2 of 7 , Jul 1, 2004
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        --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, Doug Campbell
        <beentomadrid@y...> wrote:
        > I'm curious, in hammock construction, why doesn't anyone here use
        the large hem on the ends with line threaded through it (kind of
        like the drawstring on a stuff sack)?

        Doug, I have made two hammocks this way and here is what I found:
        1. The hammock sides do not hang "right" for camping purposes, too
        loose and floppy. I still like and use it for home lounging, but
        not for camping. The loose sides complicates the bug neeting and
        underquilt insulation. Just my experience and opinion though...
        2. With the "line-thru-the-hem" method, the line is semi-perminately
        attached. I don't like that. I like to have my lines/straps easily
        removable. I played with a small loop, that I then attached my hang
        lines to, and that worked better, but still, problem 1. above still
        rulled out its use.

        I recently started a hammock with this method, but instead of a
        straight hem on the end, I made it curved. I've not had time to
        complete it yet, but my hope is that it solved problem 1. above.

        Still, the whipped end will ultimately use less fabric and thread,
        so will be lighter, oz for oz, than a rolled hem with the line
        through it.

        >
        > Also, I repaired on old cloth hammock by putting a rolled seam on
        the ends of the hammock bed, gathering it up by Ed Speer's method,
        and using a Jug Sling Hitch on each end to provide the "whipping."
        It also gave me a loop through which I attached my support rope. It
        worked very nicely. It would work great for Ralph's blue tarps!
        >

        I'll have to they that, good idea.

        Shane "Mirage"...
      • Matthew Takeda
        ... I do. I just don t talk about it a lot. ... This is interesting. It is the opposite of my experience. The sides of my hammocks are not floppy at all. In
        Message 3 of 7 , Jul 2, 2004
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          Doug Campbell wrote:
          >I'm curious, in hammock construction, why doesn't anyone here use the
          >large hem on the ends with line threaded through it (kind of like the
          >drawstring on a stuff sack)?

          I do. I just don't talk about it a lot.

          Mirage wrote:
          >Doug, I have made two hammocks this way and here is what I found:
          >1. The hammock sides do not hang "right" for camping purposes, too
          >loose and floppy.

          This is interesting. It is the opposite of my experience. The sides of my
          hammocks are not floppy at all. In fact, because of the way the line
          curves, the sides are significantly tighter than the middle.

          >2. With the "line-thru-the-hem" method, the line is semi-perminately
          >attached. I don't like that. I like to have my lines/straps easily
          >removable.

          I guess I just don't understand what you're doing. My hem makes a fabric
          tube. I fit it to a piece of plastic tubing to prevent chafe between the
          hanging line and the fabric, but even if I didn't, the line would easily
          slip in and out. How are you fastening the line on that makes it
          "semi-permanently attached?"

          Matthew Takeda
          the JOAT
        • uluheman
          I ve made two line-through-the-hem hammocks. One is very wide (I pieced together two strips of sturdy nylon with a longitudinal seam along the middle of the
          Message 4 of 7 , Jul 3, 2004
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            I've made two line-through-the-hem hammocks. One is very wide (I pieced together two
            strips of sturdy nylon with a longitudinal seam along the middle of the hammock; the
            seam doesn't give as much as the surrounding fabric, but that hasn't been a major comfort
            problem) and the other is a bit narrow for my taste (I used a waste piece from a sailmaker;
            that purple piece is about 5 times as strong as 1.9 oz nylon, but the sailmaker still said he
            wouldn't trust it as a hammock; Ha!). The big one once held four people at once for
            lounging (!), and the smaller one easily holds two.

            I'm happy with the tension of the sides. I find that with any large hammock, success in
            getting comfortable, especially if sharing with one or more others, depends on finding just
            the right sweet spots for legs and feet and elbows and head, etc. There are an infinite
            number of arrangements, but for any given one, there will be a perfect way to place your
            limbs so that your head and shoulders are happy.

            My Hammock Bliss hammock is also made with the line-through-the-hem. I've put spectra
            line and tree-huggers on all of them.

            Brandon in Honolulu

            --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, Matthew Takeda <takeda@s...> wrote:
            > Doug Campbell wrote:
            > >I'm curious, in hammock construction, why doesn't anyone here use the
            > >large hem on the ends with line threaded through it (kind of like the
            > >drawstring on a stuff sack)?
            >
            > I do. I just don't talk about it a lot.
            >
            > Mirage wrote:
            > >Doug, I have made two hammocks this way and here is what I found:
            > >1. The hammock sides do not hang "right" for camping purposes, too
            > >loose and floppy.
            >
            > This is interesting. It is the opposite of my experience. The sides of my
            > hammocks are not floppy at all. In fact, because of the way the line
            > curves, the sides are significantly tighter than the middle.
            >
            > >2. With the "line-thru-the-hem" method, the line is semi-perminately
            > >attached. I don't like that. I like to have my lines/straps easily
            > >removable.
            >
            > I guess I just don't understand what you're doing. My hem makes a fabric
            > tube. I fit it to a piece of plastic tubing to prevent chafe between the
            > hanging line and the fabric, but even if I didn't, the line would easily
            > slip in and out. How are you fastening the line on that makes it
            > "semi-permanently attached?"
            >
            > Matthew Takeda
            > the JOAT
          • David Chinell
            I use several models of drawstring hammocks, including the Nomad Tropical Hammock, Hammock Bliss Hammock, Mosquito Hammock, and Crazy Creek Crib. I notice
            Message 5 of 7 , Jul 3, 2004
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              I use several models of "drawstring" hammocks, including the Nomad Tropical
              Hammock, Hammock Bliss Hammock, Mosquito Hammock, and Crazy Creek Crib.

              I notice that most of these, with the exception of the Crazy Creek and the
              Mosquito use either nothing or supple fabric to reinforce the casing (hem)
              that the hanging ropes pass through. On these, the sides are a bit loose.

              The Crazy Creek uses a heavy leather-like material to reinforce the outer
              inch and a half of the casing. This makes the drawstrings pull the sides
              much tighter than the body. On the Mosquito Hammock, there are at least
              three layers of fabric in the casing, which lends some stiffness to the
              entire casing, and I notice the same tendency to tighten the sides of the
              hammock.

              In short, I think the structure of the casing and reinforcement material, or
              lack of reinforcement material, determines whether or not a drawstring
              hammock will have tight or loose edges.

              I much prefer the looser edges, as these take the worst beating when I get
              in or out. I actually destroyed a Crazy Creek hammock at the reinforcing
              patch in completely mild (back yard) conditions. So I don't think rigid
              reinforcements are a good idea.

              Bear
            • halconsfire
              I have the same style hammock and my sides are tight. I also have a bugnet with a zipper I made with the same principle in mind. my hammock is 36 wide so I
              Message 6 of 7 , Jul 3, 2004
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                I have the same style hammock and my sides are tight. I also have a
                bugnet with a zipper I made with the same principle in mind.

                my hammock is 36" wide so I took some stretchy mesh fabric and made
                it 48" wide and the 5" longer than the hammock. I did the draw string
                thing to the ends and stitched a zipper down the entire length of the
                mesh. the bugnet goes around the entire hammock and zips up the ends
                are drawn tight because of the line that runs through the 2" hems on
                the ends. it looks and works great.

                Halcon
              • Mirage
                ... sides of my ... line ... I did not mean to imply the sides were floppy , but not optimally tensioned for my preferences when using my home made under/over
                Message 7 of 7 , Jul 6, 2004
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                  --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, Matthew Takeda <takeda@s...>
                  wrote:
                  > Mirage wrote:
                  > >Doug, I have made two hammocks this way and here is what I found:
                  > >1. The hammock sides do not hang "right" for camping purposes, too
                  > >loose and floppy.
                  >
                  > This is interesting. It is the opposite of my experience. The
                  sides of my
                  > hammocks are not floppy at all. In fact, because of the way the
                  line
                  > curves, the sides are significantly tighter than the middle.

                  I did not mean to imply the sides were "floppy", but not optimally
                  tensioned for my preferences when using my home made under/over
                  quilt (similar in function to Ed Speers PeaPod).

                  I have several made with the "line-thru-the-hem" method, and like
                  them very much. They are much more comfortable (to me)
                  for "lounging" in. They also work OK with underquilts that do not
                  wrap around the entire hammock.

                  Just my personal observations and preferences.

                  >
                  > >2. With the "line-thru-the-hem" method, the line is semi-
                  perminately
                  > >attached. I don't like that. I like to have my lines/straps
                  easily
                  > >removable.
                  >
                  > I guess I just don't understand what you're doing. My hem makes a
                  fabric
                  > tube. I fit it to a piece of plastic tubing to prevent chafe
                  between the
                  > hanging line and the fabric, but even if I didn't, the line would
                  easily
                  > slip in and out. How are you fastening the line on that makes it
                  > "semi-permanently attached?"
                  >

                  I guess what I was trying to say was that the way I have done this,
                  I end up with a bunch of hammock hem gathered at the end, with a
                  rope running thru the hem. I usually then tie a knot or make a loop
                  out of the ropejust big enough to tie another rope/strap to for
                  hanging. This method ends up with a loop whose flat lenght
                  (circumference) is less than the width of the hammock end. If I
                  were to pull it out in the field, re-threading it would be a pain.

                  I'm sure there are other ways of doing it that I've not tried or
                  thought of that would be less troublesome to work with.

                  Hike your own hike; Hang your own hammock ;)

                  Shane "Mirage"...
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