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Re:4.3oz Hammock

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  • Gregg Spoering
    Thanks Shane, I might give this a try to shave a bit of weight off my latest hamock- 1.1 oz (uncoated silnylon) double bottom Speer/ Risk style. With bug net
    Message 1 of 12 , Jul 1, 2004
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      Thanks Shane,
      I might give this a try to shave a bit of weight off my latest hamock-
      1.1 oz (uncoated silnylon) double bottom Speer/ Risk style. With bug net
      and homemade poncho tarp (larger that the extended Equinox, I'm 6'3")
      and including snakeskins, I have it down to 2.12 lbs. If I can lose the
      weight of the hammock knots, I'll be happy.(getting compulsive here...).
      Will probably change the poly straps to some spectra line and use my
      Hennessy tree huggers.
      Gregg

      Date: Wed, 30 Jun 2004 15:17:12 -0000
      From: "Mirage" <mirage@...>

      Gregg,

      I'll get some pics up later in the week, but here is an attempt to
      explain it. This is
      based off the basic Speer design, but narrower and instead of the
      overhand knot, we
      whipp the ends.

      1. Cut your fabric to desired lenght (2 feet longer than you).
      2. Hem the ends and edges with a rolled hem (or whatever).
      3. Gather (as per the speer method) or fold (as per the Hennessy method)
      the short
      end of the hammock fabric. You'll want to end up with no more than 1"
      width, it will
      be easier to work with.
      4. Tie, pinch, or bind the end so you can free both hands for the
      whipping.
      5. Being sure to make the whipping VERY tight, tie/wrap a whipping such
      as
      http://www.inquiry.net/images/whip.jpg to the end, just inside the
      hemmed edge of
      the end.
      6. Once the whipping is done, be sure to pull the end that was wrapped
      under, such
      that the working end gets folded and pulled into the binding.
      7. Attach your hang ropes/straps as desired. I use a larks head.

      That's it.

      The criticle part is hemming the ends. This is what prevents the
      whipping from
      slidding off. Thanks to Rick and others for discovering this. My prior
      attempts were
      all failing w/in 30 minutes of use because there was not enought
      material thickness
      to bind the whipping and prevent it from slipping off. I had a few
      bruises ;)

      Shane "Mirage"...
    • dlfrost_1
      ... prior ... If you make the hem-over large enough to slide an old bit of rope through, it will bulk-up the end even further. (Gives ya something to do with
      Message 2 of 12 , Jul 2, 2004
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        --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, Gregg Spoering <gspoerin@s...>
        wrote:
        > The criticle part is hemming the ends. This is what prevents the
        > whipping from
        > slidding off. Thanks to Rick and others for discovering this. My
        prior
        > attempts were
        > all failing w/in 30 minutes of use because there was not enought
        > material thickness
        > to bind the whipping and prevent it from slipping off. I had a few
        > bruises ;)

        If you make the hem-over large enough to slide an old bit of rope
        through, it will bulk-up the end even further. (Gives ya something
        to do with that old rope that didn't work out for hammocking...)

        Doug Frost
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