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Re: 4.3oz Hammock

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  • Mirage
    ... be ... I suppose you may be correct. To be honest, the fabric did not have a listed weight so I was guestimating it to be 1.9oz. Joann s does not
    Message 1 of 12 , Jun 28, 2004
      --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, "Dave Womble" <dpwomble@y...>
      wrote:
      > Shane,
      >
      > Something is not adding up, a 4'x8' piece of 1.9 oz ripstop nylon
      > would weigh in at 6.8 oz. If it was 1.1 oz ripstop nylon it would
      be
      > 3.9 oz. Think maybe you are using 1.1 oz material?
      >

      I suppose you may be correct. To be honest, the fabric did not have
      a listed weight so I was "guestimating" it to be 1.9oz. Joann's
      does not typically carry the lighter weight tech fabric like the
      1.1ox ripstop.

      Yet still, remember that a sq yd of fabric is not really "square",
      but 1 yard of fabric at bolt width, or 60" in this case. so 1 sq yd
      of this fabric was 2160 sq in (60"x36"). My piece was 4608 sq in
      (96"x48"), or 2.13 sq yd (4608/2160 = 2.13). At 1.9oz/sq yd, my
      piece would weight in at 4.05oz.

      Using 1.1oz should yield a body weight of 2.34oz, plus whipping.

      Pretty sure I did that right, but I am open to correction.

      Shane "Mirage"...
    • Dave Womble
      Shane, All of the 1.1 oz and 1.9 oz rip-stop nylon that I have weighs 1.1 oz/sq yd and 1.9 oz/sq yd, respectively, and a 4 x8 piece would be 32 sq ft or 3.56
      Message 2 of 12 , Jun 28, 2004
        Shane,

        All of the 1.1 oz and 1.9 oz rip-stop nylon that I have weighs 1.1
        oz/sq yd and 1.9 oz/sq yd, respectively, and a 4'x8' piece would be
        32 sq ft or 3.56 sq yd (32/9 = 3.56). When I buy rip-stop nylon and
        don't know the fabic weight per square yard, I measure the length,
        width, weight and then compute the oz/sq yd. In your case, if a
        4'x8' piece weighs 4.05 oz, then that computes to 1.14 oz/sq yd and I
        would reason that you are using 1.1 oz/sq yd rip-stop nylon instead
        of 1.9 oz/sq yd rip-stop nylon. It is my understanding that the
        Hennessy Hammock racer series of hammocks use 1.1 oz rip-stop nylon
        for the hammock bed.

        Youngblood


        --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, "Mirage" <mirage@p...> wrote:
        >
        > I suppose you may be correct. To be honest, the fabric did not
        have
        > a listed weight so I was "guestimating" it to be 1.9oz. Joann's
        > does not typically carry the lighter weight tech fabric like the
        > 1.1ox ripstop.
        >
        > Yet still, remember that a sq yd of fabric is not really "square",
        > but 1 yard of fabric at bolt width, or 60" in this case. so 1 sq
        yd
        > of this fabric was 2160 sq in (60"x36"). My piece was 4608 sq in
        > (96"x48"), or 2.13 sq yd (4608/2160 = 2.13). At 1.9oz/sq yd, my
        > piece would weight in at 4.05oz.
        >
        > Using 1.1oz should yield a body weight of 2.34oz, plus whipping.
        >
        > Pretty sure I did that right, but I am open to correction.
        >
        > Shane "Mirage"...
      • Brian MacMillin
        That is not true. This is taken from OWFINC s site: Fabric weights listed are generally by the square yd (36x36) although we SELL by the linear yard (generally
        Message 3 of 12 , Jun 28, 2004
          That is not true. This is taken from OWFINC's site:

          Fabric weights listed are generally by the square yd (36x36) although we
          SELL by the linear yard (generally 36x60)

          So a 60" piece of fabric would weigh 1.66 times as much as the listed
          weight. (60\36=1.66).

          Best regards,
          Brian MacMillin
          OutdoorEquipmentSupplier
          Oes #@# hvc.rr.com


          > Yet still, remember that a sq yd of fabric is not really "square",
          > but 1 yard of fabric at bolt width, or 60" in this case
        • Mirage
          ... be ... and ... and I ... instead ... nylon ... I stand most humbly corrected. Shane Mirage ...
          Message 4 of 12 , Jun 28, 2004
            --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, "Dave Womble" <dpwomble@y...>
            wrote:
            > Shane,
            >
            > All of the 1.1 oz and 1.9 oz rip-stop nylon that I have weighs 1.1
            > oz/sq yd and 1.9 oz/sq yd, respectively, and a 4'x8' piece would
            be
            > 32 sq ft or 3.56 sq yd (32/9 = 3.56). When I buy rip-stop nylon
            and
            > don't know the fabic weight per square yard, I measure the length,
            > width, weight and then compute the oz/sq yd. In your case, if a
            > 4'x8' piece weighs 4.05 oz, then that computes to 1.14 oz/sq yd
            and I
            > would reason that you are using 1.1 oz/sq yd rip-stop nylon
            instead
            > of 1.9 oz/sq yd rip-stop nylon. It is my understanding that the
            > Hennessy Hammock racer series of hammocks use 1.1 oz rip-stop
            nylon
            > for the hammock bed.
            >
            > Youngblood
            >

            > > Pretty sure I did that right, but I am open to correction.
            > >
            > > Shane "Mirage"...

            I stand most humbly corrected.

            Shane "Mirage"...
          • seuss910
            Traditionally, fabric weights are given in terms of a sailmaker s yard which is 36 inches long but only 30 inches wide (1080 sq. in.) and before the
            Message 5 of 12 , Jun 28, 2004
              Traditionally, fabric "weights" are given in terms of a "sailmaker's
              yard" which is 36 inches long but only 30 inches wide (1080 sq. in.)
              and before the addition of any kind of fabric coating (most of the Jo-
              Ann's ripstops have some light coating). In practice, a square yard
              of nominally 1.1 oz. ripstop with urethane DWR can weigh upwards of 2
              oz.

              If you REALLY want to confuse matters, try expressing your fabric
              weight in terms of grams/sq. cm.

              s.

              --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, "Mirage" <mirage@p...> wrote:
              >
              > I suppose you may be correct. To be honest, the fabric did not
              have
              > a listed weight so I was "guestimating" it to be 1.9oz. Joann's
              > does not typically carry the lighter weight tech fabric like the
              > 1.1ox ripstop.
              >
              > Yet still, remember that a sq yd of fabric is not really "square",
              > but 1 yard of fabric at bolt width, or 60" in this case. so 1 sq
              yd
              > of this fabric was 2160 sq in (60"x36"). My piece was 4608 sq in
              > (96"x48"), or 2.13 sq yd (4608/2160 = 2.13). At 1.9oz/sq yd, my
              > piece would weight in at 4.05oz.
              >
              > Using 1.1oz should yield a body weight of 2.34oz, plus whipping.
              >
              > Pretty sure I did that right, but I am open to correction.
              >
              > Shane "Mirage"...
            • Gregg Spoering
              Shane, Could you recap the whipped end hammock briefly? Is this hennessy style or something different? I had a bout of bouncing emails and I m lost on this
              Message 6 of 12 , Jun 29, 2004
                Shane,
                Could you recap the whipped end hammock briefly? Is this hennessy style or something different? I had a bout of bouncing emails and I'm lost on this subject
                Thanks
                Gregg

                "Mirage" <mirage@...> wrote:
                I got a few hours to play around with the whipped end hammock idea a
                few folks have been playing with and ended up with a 4.3oz (not
                counting the hang ropes/straps) hammock.

                It is made from a 4'x8' piece of 1.9oz nylon ripstop (Joann's Fabric
                cheapo speacial) and 1/8" braided nylon rope for the whipping.

                I hemmed the ends and sides with a rolled hemp, whipped the ends
                with about 1.5" of whipping.  The hang straps are then attached with
                a larks head to the hammock on the "inside" end of the whipping (not
                on then whipping).

                I also made a bugnet from 8' of netting (54" width I believe) with a
                grosgrain ridge line and loops at the ends.  The short ends have
                hook and loop to close them over the hammock straps.  This weights
                in at 4.8oz (sans tie lines)

                I slept in it last night and slept well.  Lows over night were about
                55*F, no wind.  I slept with my homemade under/over (peapod style)
                quilt, mostly open, fleece pants (over kill, I was WARM), calpaline
                long sleeve and a fleece vest.  Bug neeting does hold warmth.

                My sleep/shelter system breaks down to this now:

                Tarp: 12.6oz
                Bugnet: 4.8oz
                Hammock: 4.3oz
                UnderQuilt: 44oz (Primaloft) 33oz (Down)
                4 Stakes: 2.8oz

                Total: 68.5oz (4.28lbs) or 57.5oz (3.59lbs) for the down bag.

                Again, this does not count tielines and hang straps/ropes.  I still
                gotta weight those.

                Shane "Mirage"...
                 
                 
                 
                 

              • Mirage
                ... Gregg, I ll get some pics up later in the week, but here is an attempt to explain it. This is based off the basic Speer design, but narrower and instead
                Message 7 of 12 , Jun 30, 2004
                  --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, Gregg Spoering <gspoerin@s...> wrote:
                  > Shane,
                  > Could you recap the whipped end hammock briefly? Is this hennessy style
                  > or something different? I had a bout of bouncing emails and I'm lost on
                  > this subject
                  > Thanks
                  > Gregg

                  Gregg,

                  I'll get some pics up later in the week, but here is an attempt to explain it. This is
                  based off the basic Speer design, but narrower and instead of the overhand knot, we
                  whipp the ends.

                  1. Cut your fabric to desired lenght (2 feet longer than you).
                  2. Hem the ends and edges with a rolled hem (or whatever).
                  3. Gather (as per the speer method) or fold (as per the Hennessy method) the short
                  end of the hammock fabric. You'll want to end up with no more than 1" width, it will
                  be easier to work with.
                  4. Tie, pinch, or bind the end so you can free both hands for the whipping.
                  5. Being sure to make the whipping VERY tight, tie/wrap a whipping such as
                  http://www.inquiry.net/images/whip.jpg to the end, just inside the hemmed edge of
                  the end.
                  6. Once the whipping is done, be sure to pull the end that was wrapped under, such
                  that the working end gets folded and pulled into the binding.
                  7. Attach your hang ropes/straps as desired. I use a larks head.

                  That's it.

                  The criticle part is hemming the ends. This is what prevents the whipping from
                  slidding off. Thanks to Rick and others for discovering this. My prior attempts were
                  all failing w/in 30 minutes of use because there was not enought material thickness
                  to bind the whipping and prevent it from slipping off. I had a few bruises ;)

                  Shane "Mirage"...
                • gerzson
                  ... I have used a thin (2-3 mm) bungee cord for the whipping. Also put the suspension cord with a stopper knot between the material folds. It seems to hold
                  Message 8 of 12 , Jul 1, 2004
                    >The criticle part is hemming the ends. This is what prevents the whipping from
                    >slidding off. Thanks to Rick and others for discovering this. My prior attempts were
                    >all failing w/in 30 minutes of use because there was not enought material thickness
                    >to bind the whipping and prevent it from slipping off. I had a few bruises ;)
                    >
                    >Shane "Mirage"...


                    I have used a thin (2-3 mm) bungee cord for the whipping.
                    Also put the suspension cord with a stopper knot between the material
                    folds.
                    It seems to hold well.


                    __o
                    _`\<,_
                    (*)/ (*)
                  • Gregg Spoering
                    Thanks Shane, I might give this a try to shave a bit of weight off my latest hamock- 1.1 oz (uncoated silnylon) double bottom Speer/ Risk style. With bug net
                    Message 9 of 12 , Jul 1, 2004
                      Thanks Shane,
                      I might give this a try to shave a bit of weight off my latest hamock-
                      1.1 oz (uncoated silnylon) double bottom Speer/ Risk style. With bug net
                      and homemade poncho tarp (larger that the extended Equinox, I'm 6'3")
                      and including snakeskins, I have it down to 2.12 lbs. If I can lose the
                      weight of the hammock knots, I'll be happy.(getting compulsive here...).
                      Will probably change the poly straps to some spectra line and use my
                      Hennessy tree huggers.
                      Gregg

                      Date: Wed, 30 Jun 2004 15:17:12 -0000
                      From: "Mirage" <mirage@...>

                      Gregg,

                      I'll get some pics up later in the week, but here is an attempt to
                      explain it. This is
                      based off the basic Speer design, but narrower and instead of the
                      overhand knot, we
                      whipp the ends.

                      1. Cut your fabric to desired lenght (2 feet longer than you).
                      2. Hem the ends and edges with a rolled hem (or whatever).
                      3. Gather (as per the speer method) or fold (as per the Hennessy method)
                      the short
                      end of the hammock fabric. You'll want to end up with no more than 1"
                      width, it will
                      be easier to work with.
                      4. Tie, pinch, or bind the end so you can free both hands for the
                      whipping.
                      5. Being sure to make the whipping VERY tight, tie/wrap a whipping such
                      as
                      http://www.inquiry.net/images/whip.jpg to the end, just inside the
                      hemmed edge of
                      the end.
                      6. Once the whipping is done, be sure to pull the end that was wrapped
                      under, such
                      that the working end gets folded and pulled into the binding.
                      7. Attach your hang ropes/straps as desired. I use a larks head.

                      That's it.

                      The criticle part is hemming the ends. This is what prevents the
                      whipping from
                      slidding off. Thanks to Rick and others for discovering this. My prior
                      attempts were
                      all failing w/in 30 minutes of use because there was not enought
                      material thickness
                      to bind the whipping and prevent it from slipping off. I had a few
                      bruises ;)

                      Shane "Mirage"...
                    • dlfrost_1
                      ... prior ... If you make the hem-over large enough to slide an old bit of rope through, it will bulk-up the end even further. (Gives ya something to do with
                      Message 10 of 12 , Jul 2, 2004
                        --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, Gregg Spoering <gspoerin@s...>
                        wrote:
                        > The criticle part is hemming the ends. This is what prevents the
                        > whipping from
                        > slidding off. Thanks to Rick and others for discovering this. My
                        prior
                        > attempts were
                        > all failing w/in 30 minutes of use because there was not enought
                        > material thickness
                        > to bind the whipping and prevent it from slipping off. I had a few
                        > bruises ;)

                        If you make the hem-over large enough to slide an old bit of rope
                        through, it will bulk-up the end even further. (Gives ya something
                        to do with that old rope that didn't work out for hammocking...)

                        Doug Frost
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