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Re: [Hammock Camping] Wonderland trail setup - opinions?

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  • Dick Matthews
    I hiked the Wonderland in 2001 so things might have changed since then. The designated campsites are designed for tents and are NOT hammock friendly. In 2001
    Message 1 of 2 , Jun 22, 2004
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      I hiked the Wonderland in 2001 so things might have changed since then.

      The designated campsites are designed for tents and are NOT hammock
      friendly.

      In 2001 all of the trailside camps were designated, but they had
      crosscountry camping in zones. The cross country zones offer a better
      chance for good hammock sites.

      I don't remember any camps above timberline other than the ones used to
      climb Rainier.

      What camps do you have?

      You will need some extenders because there are some big trees on that
      mountain.

      Dick Matthews



      ciyd01 wrote:

      > OK, I'm thinking about my Wonderland Trail trip in September and I
      > have a couple of ideas and maybe you folks have some opinions. I'd
      > like any opinions or suggestions you can make:
      >
      > Background - the Wonderland Trail circles Mt Rainier in Washington
      > state. It is 93 miles long. There are 25,000 ft of elevation gain
      > and 25,000 feet of elevation loss. Permits are required and, for
      > thru hikers, no off trail camping is allowed, you must stay in
      > designated (and reserved) camp sites. I have a 9 day itinerary,
      > shorter than I wanted, with 3 - 14 mile days with over 5,000 feet of
      > gain/loss per day.
      >
      > Regulations - technically, hammocks are not allowed as they fall into
      > the 'no girdling of trees' regulation although hammocks are not
      > expressly forbidden. Most of my campsites are below tree line.
      >
      > I normally use an HH UL Packpacker with the stock tarp and a custom
      > underquilt.
      >
      > My idea - ok, this skirts the 'no girdling of trees' bit and counts
      > on the fact that I'll be going late in the season and the rangers
      > usually aren't as anal at that time of year. I'm thinking of making
      > a double bottom Speer type hammock with a bug net and a 10 x 8 tarp.
      > I would slide a Prolite 4S sleeping pad and my closed cell foam sit
      > pad into the hammock for underside insulation. This setup should
      > allow me to use the hammock as a hammock where there are suitable
      > trees and friendly rangers. For the 2 campsites I have above
      > treeline, and nights when I encounter strict rangers, I can use the
      > tarp and bugnet as my shelter, sleep on the sleeping pads on the
      > ground and use my plastic ground sheet to protect my pad and bag.
      >
      > What do you think? Since I'm pretty small and light, can I get away
      > with 1.1 oz nylon for the double bottom hammock? Will I be able to
      > have the bugnetting removable from the hammock?
      >
      > If I can't get this to work, I'll be forced to use a tarp or tent
      > anyway. I'd just like to be able to sleep in relative comfort for
      > the really long, hard days early in the trip. I think I would have a
      > more enjoyable hike and be much better rested to tackle the next
      > day's miles.
      >
      > Any suggestions are welcome. Thanks.
      > ciyd
      >
      >
      >
      > Yahoo! Groups Links
      >
      >
      >
      >
    • Steve McBride
      ciyd, I use a double bottom 1.1 oz. nylon Speers/Risk style hammock and weigh in around 145. No problem. You can permanently attach your bug netting ala Risk
      Message 2 of 2 , Jun 22, 2004
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        ciyd,

        I use a double bottom 1.1 oz. nylon Speers/Risk style hammock and weigh in
        around 145. No problem.

        You can permanently attach your bug netting ala Risk and still pitch it on
        the ground, using the tarp over it, where trees are not available. Use
        hiking poles or downed limbs for uprights.

        Steve M

        > For the 2 campsites I have above
        > treeline, and nights when I encounter strict rangers, I can use the
        > tarp and bugnet as my shelter, sleep on the sleeping pads on the
        > ground and use my plastic ground sheet to protect my pad and bag.
        >
        > What do you think? Since I'm pretty small and light, can I get away
        > with 1.1 oz nylon for the double bottom hammock? Will I be able to
        > have the bugnetting removable from the hammock?
        >
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