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Re: Down Air Mattress

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  • Dave Womble
    ... heading ... my ... sleeping ... shock ... weather ... Well, I finished my little walk on the Georgia section of the AT. The tarp worked fine, it stayed
    Message 1 of 10 , Jun 6, 2004
      --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, "Dave Womble" <dpwomble@y...>
      wrote:
      > But right now its way too warm where I am at to not appreciate a
      > hammock for what it is best at, a warm weather shelter. I'm
      heading
      > out for a little walk in the morning on the AT and I'll be taking
      my
      > two-layer hammock with only a 24"x44"x3/8" pad and an 18 oz
      sleeping
      > bag. I'll probably be too warm! I'll also take along my homemade
      > 8'x10' catenary (ridgeline & edges) tarp with the self limiting
      shock
      > cord arrangement. I haven't taken very many trips with this
      > particular tarp and I don't think it has been exposed to high winds
      > and rain at the same time... hmmm, I'm not sure if I want the
      weather
      > to give it a real good test or not.
      >
      > Dave

      Well, I finished my little walk on the Georgia section of the AT.
      The tarp worked fine, it stayed taut every night without any
      retensioning or flapping and I think at one time or another I got hit
      with pretty good winds from every direction. Had high winds and rain
      one night on the peak of Springer Mountain and it did great... I was
      only partially hidden by a bush so I got lots of wind driven rain,
      fortunately all of it was broadside to the tarp and everything stayed
      dry.

      I was surprised at the amount of undergrowth along the trail, don't
      recall every seeing the Georgia section of the AT so close to being
      overgrown over such a wide area. The undergrowth was so thick and
      high that in some pretty long stretches it may have been easier to
      find spots for tents than for hammocks. If it wasn't for established
      and worn down camping areas, it would have been difficult to hang
      hammocks. One night I spent a lot of time trudging through the brush
      (I haven't been sensitive to poison ivy) where I told my companions
      we would camp for the night and finally found what I thought were
      suitable trees. After I stomped down and/or snapped off some of the
      undergrowth I noticed that poison ivy vines were all over the trunks
      of the trees. I'm not interested in getting poison ivy on my hands,
      so I decided to just leave a note for the folks behind me and go on
      ahead and camp at a forest road crossing (Cooper Gap) where there was
      a larger established camp site. Very frustrating. There were some
      areas where everything wasn't totally overgrown, but they seemed to
      be spotty until I got near the North Carolina border.

      On the other hand, the hammock and tarp setup worked great. I was at
      the Low Gap Shelter in Georgia on saturday night and it was very
      crowded. I stomped down a little vegation on the outskirts of one of
      the tenting areas and setup my hammock with the tarp at standup
      height. Later on three fellas set up various size tarps just a few
      feet down slope from me. Well, about an hour before daybreak it
      started raining, and raining. And then it started raining real hard-
      sheets of water on the ground had two of them retreating to the third
      guys 10x10 tarp. Shoot, I just used my umbrella to retrieve my food
      bag and cooked my breakfast sitting in my hammock out of the rain.
      They were real impressed with my setup and asked a lot of questions
      before they left.

      Dave
    • Rick
      Great report Dave! I also found the trails overgrown. Worst place was the Smoky Mountains. Like you, I mainly found places to hammock camp around established
      Message 2 of 10 , Jun 6, 2004
        Great report Dave!

        I also found the trails overgrown. Worst place was the Smoky Mountains.

        Like you, I mainly found places to hammock camp around established
        campsites. However, there were plenty of places in between where the
        undergrowth was sparse, and there was no poison ivy... just not nearly
        so much choice as in early spring.

        >Well, I finished my little walk on the Georgia section of the AT.
        >The tarp worked fine, it stayed taut every night without any
        >retensioning or flapping and I think at one time or another I got hit
        >with pretty good winds from every direction. Had high winds and rain
        >one night on the peak of Springer Mountain and it did great... I was
        >only partially hidden by a bush so I got lots of wind driven rain,
        >fortunately all of it was broadside to the tarp and everything stayed
        >dry.
        >
        >I was surprised at the amount of undergrowth along the trail, don't
        >recall every seeing the Georgia section of the AT so close to being
        >overgrown over such a wide area. The undergrowth was so thick and
        >high that in some pretty long stretches it may have been easier to
        >find spots for tents than for hammocks. If it wasn't for established
        >and worn down camping areas, it would have been difficult to hang
        >hammocks. One night I spent a lot of time trudging through the brush
        >(I haven't been sensitive to poison ivy) where I told my companions
        >we would camp for the night and finally found what I thought were
        >suitable trees. After I stomped down and/or snapped off some of the
        >undergrowth I noticed that poison ivy vines were all over the trunks
        >of the trees. I'm not interested in getting poison ivy on my hands,
        >so I decided to just leave a note for the folks behind me and go on
        >ahead and camp at a forest road crossing (Cooper Gap) where there was
        >a larger established camp site. Very frustrating. There were some
        >areas where everything wasn't totally overgrown, but they seemed to
        >be spotty until I got near the North Carolina border.
        >
        >On the other hand, the hammock and tarp setup worked great. I was at
        >the Low Gap Shelter in Georgia on saturday night and it was very
        >crowded. I stomped down a little vegation on the outskirts of one of
        >the tenting areas and setup my hammock with the tarp at standup
        >height. Later on three fellas set up various size tarps just a few
        >feet down slope from me. Well, about an hour before daybreak it
        >started raining, and raining. And then it started raining real hard-
        >sheets of water on the ground had two of them retreating to the third
        >guys 10x10 tarp. Shoot, I just used my umbrella to retrieve my food
        >bag and cooked my breakfast sitting in my hammock out of the rain.
        >They were real impressed with my setup and asked a lot of questions
        >before they left.
        >
        >

        I also camped at Low Gap. I used two trees just down slope from the
        shelter and just past the bear cables. A picture of my set up there can
        be seen:

        http://www.imrisk.com/atsouth/P5170020_web.JPG

        Note the bear cable fittings at the right of the picture.

        Again, I really enjoyed your account.

        >
        >
        Risk
      • Dave Womble
        ... Mountains. ... the ... nearly ... Yeah, I was shocked. I had previously hiked all but the last three miles of Georgia since the first of the year, most of
        Message 3 of 10 , Jun 6, 2004
          --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, Rick <ra1@i...> wrote:

          > I also found the trails overgrown. Worst place was the Smoky
          Mountains.
          >
          > Like you, I mainly found places to hammock camp around established
          > campsites. However, there were plenty of places in between where
          the
          > undergrowth was sparse, and there was no poison ivy... just not
          nearly
          > so much choice as in early spring.
          >

          Yeah, I was shocked. I had previously hiked all but the last three
          miles of Georgia since the first of the year, most of it within the
          last two months. I couldn't get to some of the places that I had
          hammock camped earlier. I had remembered a great spot on Sassafras
          Mountain that I couldn't even find/recognize. I found the scenery
          was not nearly as nice as it was prior to the green explosion... some
          of it isn't even visible now. The hiking was probably more enjoyable
          then also- its not much fun making contact with brush, grass, leaves,
          etc as you hike along, especially if it is wet. But, as usual, the
          trip was fun.

          I took along my sighting compass and had loaded the waypoints of some
          of the prominent peaks on my GPS. At overlooks, I could use the GPS
          to get the range and bearing of different peaks and then see if I had
          a line of sight to them. It was neat! At one point on Wildcat
          Mountain we had lined up from left to right: Cowrock Mountain,
          Levelland Mountain, Blood Mountain and Slaughter Mountain. I was
          even able to spot Brasstown Bald and Yonah Mountain from places I
          didn't know about (these Stone Mountain and Rabun Bald are probably
          the most recognizable peaks in Georgia). Anyhow, this is something
          that I have being playing around with for a little while and have
          been having some fun doing.

          Hey Ed, I meet a guy named Miles (?) at Low Gap Shelter that
          mentioned to me that he had done a little trail magic for Ed Speer
          when he was on the AT in 2000. I told him he ought to log on to this
          site and say 'hi'.

          Dave
        • Ed Speer
          Don t remember him Dave, but then lots of people helped me on each of my hikes. Hope he signs on ans says hi....Ed
          Message 4 of 10 , Jun 7, 2004
            Don't remember him Dave, but then lots of people helped me on each of my
            hikes. Hope he signs on ans says hi....Ed

            > Hey Ed, I meet a guy named Miles (?) at Low Gap Shelter that
            > mentioned to me that he had done a little trail magic for Ed Speer
            > when he was on the AT in 2000. I told him he ought to log on to this
            > site and say 'hi'.
            >
            > Dave
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