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More tarps and under/over quilts made...

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  • Mirage
    I hosted my Make Your Own Gear day (weekend) this last weekend, and boy did we work our butts off. Quilts on Sat, Tarps on Sunday 3 each during 10-12 hour
    Message 1 of 30 , May 25, 2004
      I hosted my "Make Your Own Gear" day (weekend) this last weekend, and boy did we
      work our butts off. Quilts on Sat, Tarps on Sunday 3 each during 10-12 hour days.

      Pics during construction and completed are posted at:

      http://homepage.mac.com/dbryans/DIYGear/PhotoAlbum1.html

      (trying out a trial .mac account, so bear with any errors or what-not).

      Shane "Mirage"...
    • firefly
      Shane, you are quite the little hunk-let! Marsanne ... I hosted my Make Your Own Gear day (weekend) this last weekend, and boy did we work our butts off.
      Message 2 of 30 , May 26, 2004

        Shane, you are quite the little hunk-let! Marsanne

         

        -----Original Message-----
         I hosted my "Make Your Own Gear" day (weekend) this last weekend, and boy did we
        work our butts off.  Quilts on Sat, Tarps on Sunday 3 each during 10-12 hour days.

        Pics during construction and completed are posted at:

        http://homepage.mac.com/dbryans/DIYGear/PhotoAlbum1.html

        (trying out a trial .mac account, so bear with any errors or what-not).

        Shane "Mirage"...



      • John Kennedy
        Nice work. Everything looks great. Any plans posted for the quilt and/or tarp? Papa John
        Message 3 of 30 , May 26, 2004
          <<<John rolled over in his sleep and muttered>>>

          Nice work. Everything looks great. Any plans posted for the quilt and/or
          tarp?

          Papa John

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        • matthulbert
          Thanks for posting the pics, Shane. Is that tarp made with the diagram you posted last week? It seems like the outer edges wouldn t need to sweep back that far
          Message 4 of 30 , May 26, 2004
            Thanks for posting the pics, Shane.

            Is that tarp made with the diagram you posted last week? It seems like
            the outer edges wouldn't need to sweep back that far (so the 'side
            length' could be longer). What do you think?

            I'm not good at math! It just looks like the sides could be longer and
            still get a good taught pitch.

            I'm planning on making one in the next few weeks. I'll try mine with
            the edges less scalloped and I'll report back how it works.

            --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, "Mirage" <mirage@p...> wrote:
            > I hosted my "Make Your Own Gear" day (weekend) this last weekend,
            and boy did we
            > work our butts off. Quilts on Sat, Tarps on Sunday 3 each during
            10-12 hour days.
            >
            > Pics during construction and completed are posted at:
            >
            > http://homepage.mac.com/dbryans/DIYGear/PhotoAlbum1.html
            >
            > (trying out a trial .mac account, so bear with any errors or what-not).
            >
            > Shane "Mirage"...
          • ciyd01
            It s like sewing machine central there! Very cool way to spend a weekend. When you seam seal the center seam of the tarp, do you put the seam sealer on the
            Message 5 of 30 , May 26, 2004
              It's like sewing machine central there! Very cool way to spend a
              weekend.

              When you seam seal the center seam of the tarp, do you put the seam
              sealer on the inside or the outside? A nagging question that's been
              on my mind lately.

              ciyd

              --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, "Mirage" <mirage@p...> wrote:
              > I hosted my "Make Your Own Gear" day (weekend) this last weekend,
              and boy did we
              > work our butts off. Quilts on Sat, Tarps on Sunday 3 each during
              10-12 hour days.
              >
              > Pics during construction and completed are posted at:
              >
              > http://homepage.mac.com/dbryans/DIYGear/PhotoAlbum1.html
              >
              > (trying out a trial .mac account, so bear with any errors or what-
              not).
              >
              > Shane "Mirage"...
            • Mirage
              ... seam ... been ... Everything I ve read says to seal the insides of the seams... I suppose this could be another religious discussion though ;) Despite
              Message 6 of 30 , May 26, 2004
                --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, "ciyd01" <ciyd@a...> wrote:
                > It's like sewing machine central there! Very cool way to spend a
                > weekend.
                >
                > When you seam seal the center seam of the tarp, do you put the
                seam
                > sealer on the inside or the outside? A nagging question that's
                been
                > on my mind lately.
                >

                Everything I've read says to seal the insides of the seams... I
                suppose this could be another "religious" discussion though ;)

                Despite what I have read, it seems to make more sense to seal the
                outsides, preventing the water from ever getting in or soaking into
                the nylon ridgeline, etc...

                I suppose if you've got the time and materials, sealing both sides
                would be the most secure, but also the heaviest option.

                Shane "Mirage"...
              • Mirage
                ... Oh GAWRSH :O... I m blushing... No wonder your in PR... You can make anything sound good can t you ;) Tis an old maxim in the schools, That flattery s
                Message 7 of 30 , May 26, 2004
                  --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, "firefly" <firefly@e...>
                  wrote:
                  > Shane, you are quite the little hunk-let! Marsanne

                  Oh GAWRSH :O... I'm blushing...

                  No wonder your in PR... You can make anything sound good can't you ;)

                  "'Tis an old maxim in the schools, That flattery's the food of
                  fools; Yet now and then your men of wit Will condescend to take a
                  bit." -Jonathan Swift

                  Shane "Mirage"...
                • Mirage
                  ... quilt and/or ... Not yet, but I ve had many requests. I m preping for 3 weeks back east (family vacation, not hiking :( ) so it will be another month or
                  Message 8 of 30 , May 26, 2004
                    --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, "John Kennedy"
                    <johnekennedy@h...> wrote:
                    > <<<John rolled over in his sleep and muttered>>>
                    >
                    > Nice work. Everything looks great. Any plans posted for the
                    quilt and/or
                    > tarp?

                    Not yet, but I've had many requests.

                    I'm preping for 3 weeks back east (family vacation, not hiking :( )
                    so it will be another month or two before I can get something put
                    together "proper" like. I'll let you folks know when I do.

                    Shane "Mirage"...
                  • firefly
                    OK, yeah, but that IS a dorky color on the quilt. Could be seen from outer space. LOL! I love the quote below. It is not only fools that like flattery, true.
                    Message 9 of 30 , May 26, 2004

                      OK, yeah, but that IS a dorky color on the quilt. Could be seen from outer space. LOL! I love the quote below. It is not only fools that like flattery, true.

                      Marsanne

                       

                      ·        
                      Oh GAWRSH :O... I'm blushing...

                      No wonder your in PR... You can make anything sound good can't you ;)

                      "'Tis an old maxim in the schools, That flattery's the food of
                      fools; Yet now and then your men of wit Will condescend to take a
                      bit." -Jonathan Swift

                      Shane "Mirage"...
                       

                    • Mirage
                      ... like ... Yes, same design as last weeks posting. The cut, shape and curves are all up to you. Every choice has its pros and cons. I found the shape I
                      Message 10 of 30 , May 26, 2004
                        --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, "matthulbert" <ms@u...> wrote:
                        > Thanks for posting the pics, Shane.
                        >
                        > Is that tarp made with the diagram you posted last week? It seems
                        like
                        > the outer edges wouldn't need to sweep back that far (so the 'side
                        > length' could be longer). What do you think?

                        Yes, same design as last weeks posting.

                        The cut, shape and curves are all up to you. Every choice has its
                        pros and cons. I found the shape I ended up with gave me a
                        reasonably light tarp with plenty of coverage in a nice taught
                        pitch. YMMV.

                        >
                        > I'm not good at math! It just looks like the sides could be longer
                        and
                        > still get a good taught pitch.

                        Sure you can, just experiment and try with plastic sheeting or cheap
                        fabric first to see what you come up with.

                        >
                        > I'm planning on making one in the next few weeks. I'll try mine
                        with
                        > the edges less scalloped and I'll report back how it works.

                        Yeah, let us know, and lot-o-pics please.

                        Shane "Mirage"...
                      • marie-noelle augendre
                        I d never thought about seam sealing the hems of my home-made tarp. However, after a very big shower, I found the hems were filled with water ; and in order to
                        Message 11 of 30 , May 26, 2004
                          I'd never thought about seam sealing the hems of my
                          home-made tarp.
                          However, after a very big shower, I found the hems
                          were filled with water ; and in order to drive the
                          water out through the seam, I had to press my fingers
                          all along the hems several times.

                          Had anybody got the same problem ?
                          What would be the best remedy ? Seam seal the hems, so
                          the water could not get in through the seam ?

                          Thanks for any idea.


                          Mirage <mirage@...> a écrit :
                          ---------------------------------

                          Everything I've read says to seal the insides of the
                          seams... I
                          suppose this could be another "religious" discussion
                          though ;)

                          Despite what I have read, it seems to make more sense
                          to seal the
                          outsides, preventing the water from ever getting in or
                          soaking into
                          the nylon ridgeline, etc...

                          I suppose if you've got the time and materials,
                          sealing both sides
                          would be the most secure, but also the heaviest
                          option.

                          Shane "Mirage"...






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                        • Mirage
                          ... I hadn t planned on sealing the hems. Too much to cover for no apparent gain. Yes my hems absorbed water during a rain last weekend, but I did just what
                          Message 12 of 30 , May 26, 2004
                            --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, marie-noelle augendre
                            <augendre@y...> wrote:
                            > I'd never thought about seam sealing the hems of my
                            > home-made tarp.
                            > However, after a very big shower, I found the hems
                            > were filled with water ; and in order to drive the
                            > water out through the seam, I had to press my fingers
                            > all along the hems several times.
                            >
                            > Had anybody got the same problem ?
                            > What would be the best remedy ? Seam seal the hems, so
                            > the water could not get in through the seam ?
                            >
                            > Thanks for any idea.

                            I hadn't planned on sealing the hems. Too much to cover for no
                            apparent gain. Yes my hems absorbed water during a rain last
                            weekend, but I did just what you did, pinched my fingers along the
                            hems as sqeezed the water out along the entire hem.

                            My though is that is can be done, but would take so much sealant to
                            completely cover the nylon hem (grosgrain ribbon in my case) that I
                            would be adding noticable weight to the tarp.

                            The sealing I do is on the under side of the ridge seam and at the
                            corner reinforcement seams.

                            That's just me...

                            Shane "Mirage"...
                          • Dave Womble
                            ... Shane, Doesn t the grosgrain ribbon add some weight? I am curious as to why you use it along the edges instead of just sewing in a hem. And in
                            Message 13 of 30 , May 26, 2004
                              >
                              > My though is that is can be done, but would take so much sealant to
                              > completely cover the nylon hem (grosgrain ribbon in my case) that I
                              > would be adding noticable weight to the tarp.
                              >
                              > The sealing I do is on the under side of the ridge seam and at the
                              > corner reinforcement seams.
                              >
                              > That's just me...
                              >
                              > Shane "Mirage"...

                              Shane,

                              Doesn't the grosgrain ribbon add some weight? I am curious as to why
                              you use it along the edges instead of just sewing in a hem. And in
                              particular, why do use grosgrain ribbon on the ridge seam, which I
                              assume is a flat felled seam? I guess what I am having a problem
                              with is that I see the grosgrain ribbon on the ridge seam as
                              something that adds a little weight and inhibits fully sealing the
                              seam. So what does grosgrain ribbon along the edges and along the
                              ridge seam do for the tarp?

                              Dave
                            • Mirage
                              ... why ... in ... Two reasons: 1. Over engineering on my part, better safe than sorry . 2. Cosmetics. Black thread in black grosgrain hides a multitude of
                              Message 14 of 30 , May 26, 2004
                                > Shane,
                                >
                                > Doesn't the grosgrain ribbon add some weight? I am curious as to
                                why
                                > you use it along the edges instead of just sewing in a hem. And
                                in
                                > particular, why do use grosgrain ribbon on the ridge seam, which I
                                > assume is a flat felled seam? I guess what I am having a problem
                                > with is that I see the grosgrain ribbon on the ridge seam as
                                > something that adds a little weight and inhibits fully sealing the
                                > seam. So what does grosgrain ribbon along the edges and along the
                                > ridge seam do for the tarp?

                                Two reasons:

                                1. Over engineering on my part, "better safe than sorry".
                                2. Cosmetics. Black thread in black grosgrain hides a multitude of
                                sin ;)

                                Really, sewing on SilNylon is not too easy and you really don't want
                                to be ripping out seams that are not straight since you've already
                                perforated the material.

                                My confidance and practice are not at a level where I can sew up
                                something like a SpinTarp with rolled edge hems.

                                I may try it some day, just not yet.

                                Another factor for the ribbon on the ridgeline was to give me
                                something stronger to attache double sided velcro loops and tieoffs
                                to hang stuff like bags or bug netting.

                                Anyway, I've never claimed to have a perfect solution, just an ever
                                evolving and adapting interest in makeing useful gear for ME.

                                I DID try roling the hem on some practice pieces and it is HARD!!!
                                My hats off to Brian and the MacCat. He rolls his hems before
                                applying the grosgrain ribbon to the edge. That's detail work at
                                it's finest.

                                As to weight, I'll have to weight out the ribbon I used to see what
                                it adds. There is also the weight of the additional thread used to
                                attach the ribbon...

                                Shane "Mirage"...
                              • ciyd01
                                My concern would be that the silnylon would stretch more than the cross grain ribbon and cause areas for water to pool. The extra strength on the ridgeline
                                Message 15 of 30 , May 26, 2004
                                  My concern would be that the silnylon would stretch more than the
                                  cross grain ribbon and cause areas for water to pool. The extra
                                  strength on the ridgeline would be nice for the reasons you
                                  mention. How has the tarp worked in the rain?

                                  Rolling the hem isn't that bad since you can pin the hem, after all,
                                  it's full of tiny needle holes from your stitching and no one seam
                                  seals the hem anyway.

                                  ciyd

                                  > > So what does grosgrain ribbon along the edges and along the
                                  > > ridge seam do for the tarp?
                                  >
                                  > Two reasons:
                                  >
                                  > 1. Over engineering on my part, "better safe than sorry".
                                  > 2. Cosmetics. Black thread in black grosgrain hides a multitude of
                                  > sin ;)
                                • Mirage
                                  ... It was only a light over night rain, and I didn t even hear it (my camping partner did). Hems and ridge were wet but no leakage. The tarp was not as
                                  Message 16 of 30 , May 26, 2004
                                    --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, "ciyd01" <ciyd@a...> wrote:
                                    > My concern would be that the silnylon would stretch more than the
                                    > cross grain ribbon and cause areas for water to pool. The extra
                                    > strength on the ridgeline would be nice for the reasons you
                                    > mention. How has the tarp worked in the rain?

                                    It was only a light over night rain, and I didn't even hear it (my
                                    camping partner did). Hems and ridge were wet but no leakage. The
                                    tarp was not as taught in the morning as it was in the evening, but
                                    neither was it flapping and loose. I suspect the tie lines mostly,
                                    but honestly don't know for sure.

                                    >
                                    > Rolling the hem isn't that bad since you can pin the hem, after
                                    all,
                                    > it's full of tiny needle holes from your stitching and no one seam
                                    > seals the hem anyway.

                                    But pinning takes SOOOOOooooo long and I am SOOOOOooooo impatient ;)

                                    Turns out that pinning on the curve like that can make for wrinkles
                                    and puckers if you still dont take it nice and slow, about 3-4
                                    inches at a burst. Once I discovered this, I found it faster over
                                    all to just roll each 3-4 in section right at the machine before in
                                    goes under the foot. I didn't notice an apreciable difference at
                                    actuall sewing time with or w/out the pins, but pre-pinning added
                                    significant time to construction.

                                    When sewing on a straight edge or not roling a hem on a curve, then
                                    I do pin.

                                    A trick my friends wife showed me this last weekend was to use those
                                    glue sticks to hold the layer together. You have to be careful
                                    though, because as it dries out, it stops holding... So don't plan
                                    on glueing more than 4 ft. at a time before you get it to the
                                    machine.

                                    Shane "Mirage"...
                                  • Dave Womble
                                    ... Shane, I think the silnylon stretches during the night, especially when it gets wet. I use tie-out cord that has little or no stretch along with short
                                    Message 17 of 30 , May 26, 2004
                                      --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, "Mirage" <mirage@p...> wrote:
                                      >
                                      > It was only a light over night rain, and I didn't even hear it (my
                                      > camping partner did). Hems and ridge were wet but no leakage. The
                                      > tarp was not as taught in the morning as it was in the evening, but
                                      > neither was it flapping and loose. I suspect the tie lines mostly,
                                      > but honestly don't know for sure.
                                      >

                                      Shane,

                                      I think the silnylon stretches during the night, especially when it
                                      gets wet. I use tie-out cord that has little or no stretch along
                                      with short pieces of shock cord in parallel with the cord used on the
                                      side tie-outs. The shock cords seem to keep things reasonably taut
                                      during the night and since the shock cords are in parallel with a
                                      portion of the tie-out cords, I can see about how much slack they
                                      have taken up (when the shock cord takes up slack the tie-out cord
                                      that it is in parallel with becomes limp). It is usually several
                                      inches.

                                      Youngblood
                                    • Dave Womble
                                      ... want ... Shane, I understand. I also struggle with sewing silnylon. I have to get pumped up and then go for it. And yes, all of this is an evolving
                                      Message 18 of 30 , May 26, 2004
                                        --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, "Mirage" <mirage@p...> wrote:
                                        >
                                        > Two reasons:
                                        >
                                        > 1. Over engineering on my part, "better safe than sorry".
                                        > 2. Cosmetics. Black thread in black grosgrain hides a multitude of
                                        > sin ;)
                                        >
                                        > Really, sewing on SilNylon is not too easy and you really don't
                                        want
                                        > to be ripping out seams that are not straight since you've already
                                        > perforated the material.
                                        >
                                        > My confidance and practice are not at a level where I can sew up
                                        > something like a SpinTarp with rolled edge hems.
                                        >
                                        > I may try it some day, just not yet.
                                        >
                                        > Another factor for the ribbon on the ridgeline was to give me
                                        > something stronger to attache double sided velcro loops and tieoffs
                                        > to hang stuff like bags or bug netting.
                                        >
                                        > Anyway, I've never claimed to have a perfect solution, just an ever
                                        > evolving and adapting interest in makeing useful gear for ME.
                                        >
                                        > I DID try roling the hem on some practice pieces and it is HARD!!!
                                        > My hats off to Brian and the MacCat. He rolls his hems before
                                        > applying the grosgrain ribbon to the edge. That's detail work at
                                        > it's finest.
                                        >
                                        > As to weight, I'll have to weight out the ribbon I used to see what
                                        > it adds. There is also the weight of the additional thread used to
                                        > attach the ribbon...
                                        >
                                        > Shane "Mirage"...

                                        Shane,

                                        I understand. I also struggle with sewing silnylon. I have to get
                                        pumped up and then go for it. And yes, all of this is an evolving
                                        process. But, we're getting better and smarter.

                                        I'm not worried about the weight of the grosgrain ribbon; I asked
                                        that because you said something about the weight of the seam sealer
                                        and I wanted to point out that the seam sealer might have weighted
                                        less than the grosgrain ribbon. I would worry about seams that
                                        filled up with water. Besides the added pack weight of the water, I
                                        would worry about potential mildew. I like the look of your tarps,
                                        looks like you have a pretty taut rig.

                                        Youngblood
                                      • Ralph Oborn
                                        Just a thought from someone who has not touched a sewing machine (wife won t let me). Would it be easier to roll the edge if you rolled it around something and
                                        Message 19 of 30 , May 26, 2004
                                          Just a thought from someone who has not touched a sewing machine
                                          (wife won't let me). Would it be easier to roll the edge if you
                                          rolled it around something and then slid it out?
                                          Small dowel, soda straw, knitting needle, cord or wire.... etc?
                                          I am probably once again showing my ignorance. I am in awe of the
                                          stuff I see in the pictures.
                                          Ralph



                                          > > My confidance and practice are not at a level where I can sew up
                                          > > something like a SpinTarp with rolled edge hems.
                                          > >
                                          > > I may try it some day, just not yet.
                                          > >

                                          > >
                                          > > I DID try rolling the hem on some practice pieces and it is
                                          HARD!!!
                                          > > My hats off to Brian and the MacCat. He rolls his hems before
                                          > > applying the grosgrain ribbon to the edge. That's detail work
                                          at it's finest.
                                          > >
                                        • Mirage
                                          ... Actually, they make (for most machines) a rolled hem foot that takes the fabric and rolls it just before it get to the needle. It works great on
                                          Message 20 of 30 , May 26, 2004
                                            --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, "Ralph Oborn"
                                            <polecatpop@y...> wrote:
                                            > Just a thought from someone who has not touched a sewing machine
                                            > (wife won't let me). Would it be easier to roll the edge if you
                                            > rolled it around something and then slid it out?
                                            > Small dowel, soda straw, knitting needle, cord or wire.... etc?
                                            > I am probably once again showing my ignorance. I am in awe of the
                                            > stuff I see in the pictures.
                                            > Ralph

                                            Actually, they make (for most machines) a rolled hem foot that takes
                                            the fabric and rolls it just before it get to the needle.

                                            It works great on traditional fabrics, and with some practice, I
                                            might be able to do it to to my satisfaction. When I tried it, the
                                            slick nature of the SilNylon made it difficult at best. I think
                                            though, with some more practice, and a larger rolled hem foot, it
                                            would be doable.

                                            Shane "Mirage"...
                                          • Shane Steinkamp
                                            ... Nope. My particular trick is to use a staple gun. Fold and tack, fold and tack... Then you just stitch right over the staples. They ll pull out. Shane
                                            Message 21 of 30 , May 26, 2004
                                              > Just a thought from someone who has not touched a sewing machine
                                              > (wife won't let me). Would it be easier to roll the edge if you
                                              > rolled it around something and then slid it out?
                                              > Small dowel, soda straw, knitting needle, cord or wire.... etc?
                                              > I am probably once again showing my ignorance. I am in awe of the
                                              > stuff I see in the pictures.

                                              Nope. My particular trick is to use a staple gun. Fold and tack, fold and
                                              tack... Then you just stitch right over the staples. They'll pull out.

                                              Shane
                                            • matthulbert
                                              I ve done two tarps and a double bottom hammock and did all of the hems on-the-fly. (I ve done more than 100 of hems at this point) and it just takes a little
                                              Message 22 of 30 , May 27, 2004
                                                I've done two tarps and a double bottom hammock and did all of the
                                                hems on-the-fly. (I've done more than 100' of hems at this point) and
                                                it just takes a little practice.

                                                I sew about 2 feet at a burst and just tuck/roll the seam in as I go.
                                                I don's use needles, clips or tape. I fold the fabric with my finger
                                                and make the depth consistant by making it come almost up to my first
                                                knuckle of my index finger.

                                                While sewing I hold the seam with my left hand behind the sewing
                                                machine and hold the seam with my right hand about 1-3 feet in front
                                                of the machine. Then I sew while gently pulling it through until my
                                                right hand gets close to needle. Then I stop, arrange the seam with
                                                both hands until it's right, hold the folded fabric with my right
                                                hand, put my left hand back behind the machine and grasp the fabric
                                                and repeat.

                                                I did my last tarp (a 5x9) from scratch in less than 3 hours. It just
                                                takes practice. I did my hammock first, since it didn't matter how
                                                nice the seams were on it and it was not silnylon!

                                                --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, "Mirage" <mirage@p...> wrote:
                                                > --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, "Ralph Oborn"
                                                > <polecatpop@y...> wrote:
                                                > > Just a thought from someone who has not touched a sewing machine
                                                > > (wife won't let me). Would it be easier to roll the edge if you
                                                > > rolled it around something and then slid it out?
                                                > > Small dowel, soda straw, knitting needle, cord or wire.... etc?
                                                > > I am probably once again showing my ignorance. I am in awe of the
                                                > > stuff I see in the pictures.
                                                > > Ralph
                                                >
                                                > Actually, they make (for most machines) a rolled hem foot that takes
                                                > the fabric and rolls it just before it get to the needle.
                                                >
                                                > It works great on traditional fabrics, and with some practice, I
                                                > might be able to do it to to my satisfaction. When I tried it, the
                                                > slick nature of the SilNylon made it difficult at best. I think
                                                > though, with some more practice, and a larger rolled hem foot, it
                                                > would be doable.
                                                >
                                                > Shane "Mirage"...
                                              • matthulbert
                                                On my next tarp (which will be like Mirages) I m going to run really thin 3/4 crossgain ribbon along the ridgeline (on what I consider the underside). When I
                                                Message 23 of 30 , May 27, 2004
                                                  On my next tarp (which will be like Mirages) I'm going to run really
                                                  thin 3/4" crossgain ribbon along the ridgeline (on what I consider the
                                                  underside). When I sew it on, I'm going to leave gaps in my stitches
                                                  every 1-2 feet so that I can tie things to it underneath like bug
                                                  nets, loop my glasses throught, etc.

                                                  The 3/4" crossgain is really light (it's the really thin weave) and
                                                  still plenty strong for tarps. My ID SilTarp 2 uses it and my 5x8 tarp
                                                  is so light I can't believe it!


                                                  --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, "matthulbert" <ms@u...> wrote:
                                                  > I've done two tarps and a double bottom hammock and did all of the
                                                  > hems on-the-fly. (I've done more than 100' of hems at this point) and
                                                  > it just takes a little practice.
                                                  >
                                                  > I sew about 2 feet at a burst and just tuck/roll the seam in as I go.
                                                  > I don's use needles, clips or tape. I fold the fabric with my finger
                                                  > and make the depth consistant by making it come almost up to my first
                                                  > knuckle of my index finger.
                                                  >
                                                  > While sewing I hold the seam with my left hand behind the sewing
                                                  > machine and hold the seam with my right hand about 1-3 feet in front
                                                  > of the machine. Then I sew while gently pulling it through until my
                                                  > right hand gets close to needle. Then I stop, arrange the seam with
                                                  > both hands until it's right, hold the folded fabric with my right
                                                  > hand, put my left hand back behind the machine and grasp the fabric
                                                  > and repeat.
                                                  >
                                                  > I did my last tarp (a 5x9) from scratch in less than 3 hours. It just
                                                  > takes practice. I did my hammock first, since it didn't matter how
                                                  > nice the seams were on it and it was not silnylon!
                                                  >
                                                  > --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, "Mirage" <mirage@p...> wrote:
                                                  > > --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, "Ralph Oborn"
                                                  > > <polecatpop@y...> wrote:
                                                  > > > Just a thought from someone who has not touched a sewing machine
                                                  > > > (wife won't let me). Would it be easier to roll the edge if you
                                                  > > > rolled it around something and then slid it out?
                                                  > > > Small dowel, soda straw, knitting needle, cord or wire.... etc?
                                                  > > > I am probably once again showing my ignorance. I am in awe of the
                                                  > > > stuff I see in the pictures.
                                                  > > > Ralph
                                                  > >
                                                  > > Actually, they make (for most machines) a rolled hem foot that takes
                                                  > > the fabric and rolls it just before it get to the needle.
                                                  > >
                                                  > > It works great on traditional fabrics, and with some practice, I
                                                  > > might be able to do it to to my satisfaction. When I tried it, the
                                                  > > slick nature of the SilNylon made it difficult at best. I think
                                                  > > though, with some more practice, and a larger rolled hem foot, it
                                                  > > would be doable.
                                                  > >
                                                  > > Shane "Mirage"...
                                                • dlfrost_1
                                                  ... why ... When placed on a catenary curve tarp edge, the additional reinforcement helps to smooth out the interior of the tarp, especially in stretchy stuff
                                                  Message 24 of 30 , May 27, 2004
                                                    --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, "Dave Womble" <dpwomble@y...>
                                                    wrote:
                                                    > Doesn't the grosgrain ribbon add some weight? I am curious as to
                                                    why
                                                    > you use it along the edges instead of just sewing in a hem. And in
                                                    > particular, why do use grosgrain ribbon on the ridge seam, which I
                                                    > assume is a flat felled seam? I guess what I am having a problem
                                                    > with is that I see the grosgrain ribbon on the ridge seam as
                                                    > something that adds a little weight and inhibits fully sealing the
                                                    > seam. So what does grosgrain ribbon along the edges and along the
                                                    > ridge seam do for the tarp?

                                                    When placed on a catenary curve tarp edge, the additional
                                                    reinforcement helps to smooth out the interior of the tarp,
                                                    especially in stretchy stuff like syl-nylon.

                                                    It works sort of like how a suspension bridge works: The pull on the
                                                    edge works to pull the curved line straight. This applies a pull
                                                    against the interior areas of the fabric, reducing slack and
                                                    consequent flapping, sagging, etcetera. The stiffer the edge, the
                                                    more of this effect you will get.

                                                    Doug Frost
                                                  • Dave Womble
                                                    Doug, That sounds fasinating. Are you reasonably sure that a stiffer edging material works that way with silnylon tarps, or are you speculating? Dave ...
                                                    Message 25 of 30 , May 28, 2004
                                                      Doug,

                                                      That sounds fasinating. Are you reasonably sure that a stiffer
                                                      edging material works that way with silnylon tarps, or are you
                                                      speculating?

                                                      Dave

                                                      --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, "dlfrost_1" <dlfrost@a...>
                                                      wrote:
                                                      > --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, "Dave Womble"
                                                      <dpwomble@y...>
                                                      > wrote:
                                                      > > Doesn't the grosgrain ribbon add some weight? I am curious as to
                                                      > why
                                                      > > you use it along the edges instead of just sewing in a hem. And
                                                      in
                                                      > > particular, why do use grosgrain ribbon on the ridge seam, which
                                                      I
                                                      > > assume is a flat felled seam? I guess what I am having a problem
                                                      > > with is that I see the grosgrain ribbon on the ridge seam as
                                                      > > something that adds a little weight and inhibits fully sealing
                                                      the
                                                      > > seam. So what does grosgrain ribbon along the edges and along
                                                      the
                                                      > > ridge seam do for the tarp?
                                                      >
                                                      > When placed on a catenary curve tarp edge, the additional
                                                      > reinforcement helps to smooth out the interior of the tarp,
                                                      > especially in stretchy stuff like syl-nylon.
                                                      >
                                                      > It works sort of like how a suspension bridge works: The pull on
                                                      the
                                                      > edge works to pull the curved line straight. This applies a pull
                                                      > against the interior areas of the fabric, reducing slack and
                                                      > consequent flapping, sagging, etcetera. The stiffer the edge, the
                                                      > more of this effect you will get.
                                                      >
                                                      > Doug Frost
                                                    • Rick
                                                      ... I actually find it quite easy to roll the hem on the fly, without pins. I just need to keep the width of the hem even with the gage on the footplate of the
                                                      Message 26 of 30 , May 28, 2004
                                                        Mirage wrote:

                                                        >--- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, "Ralph Oborn"
                                                        ><polecatpop@y...> wrote:
                                                        >
                                                        >
                                                        >>Just a thought from someone who has not touched a sewing machine
                                                        >>(wife won't let me). Would it be easier to roll the edge if you
                                                        >>rolled it around something and then slid it out?
                                                        >>Small dowel, soda straw, knitting needle, cord or wire.... etc?
                                                        >>I am probably once again showing my ignorance. I am in awe of the
                                                        >>stuff I see in the pictures.
                                                        >>Ralph
                                                        >>
                                                        >>
                                                        >
                                                        >Actually, they make (for most machines) a rolled hem foot that takes
                                                        >the fabric and rolls it just before it get to the needle.
                                                        >
                                                        >It works great on traditional fabrics, and with some practice, I
                                                        >might be able to do it to to my satisfaction. When I tried it, the
                                                        >slick nature of the SilNylon made it difficult at best. I think
                                                        >though, with some more practice, and a larger rolled hem foot, it
                                                        >would be doable.
                                                        >
                                                        >Shane "Mirage"...
                                                        >
                                                        >
                                                        >
                                                        I actually find it quite easy to roll the hem on the fly, without pins.
                                                        I just need to keep the width of the hem even with the gage on the
                                                        footplate of the sewing machine. I don't seamseal the hems, because I
                                                        want the water which *will* collect there, a wick to leave the seam.
                                                        The thread acts as that wick. On the ridgeline, I use a little silicone
                                                        sealer disolved in white gas, painted lightly on both inside and outside
                                                        with a brush. The effect is to get the threads to take up enough
                                                        silicone to be very water repellant.

                                                        Rick
                                                      • Matthew Takeda
                                                        ... I m using bias tape on the tarp I m making now, since I think it should have no problems with stretch (it may also be lighter than grosgrain ribbon, but
                                                        Message 27 of 30 , May 29, 2004
                                                          ciyd01 wrote:
                                                          >My concern would be that the silnylon would stretch more than the
                                                          >cross grain ribbon and cause areas for water to pool. The extra
                                                          >strength on the ridgeline would be nice for the reasons you
                                                          >mention. How has the tarp worked in the rain?

                                                          I'm using bias tape on the tarp I'm making now, since I think it should
                                                          have no problems with stretch (it may also be lighter than grosgrain
                                                          ribbon, but the difference is probably too small to matter). I'll report
                                                          back after it's made and tested in the field. I also usually spray silicone
                                                          on the stitching in silnylon, since I figure the silicone will soak into
                                                          the stitching and at least partially waterproof the seam.

                                                          Matthew Takeda
                                                          the JOAT
                                                        • dlfrost_1
                                                          ... Reasonably sure. But I wouldn t go overboard with it. The less the edging is able to stretch the less it will go along smoothly with the syl-nylon. You
                                                          Message 28 of 30 , May 29, 2004
                                                            --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, "Dave Womble" <dpwomble@y...>
                                                            wrote:
                                                            > Doug,
                                                            >
                                                            > That sounds fasinating. Are you reasonably sure that a stiffer
                                                            > edging material works that way with silnylon tarps, or are you
                                                            > speculating?
                                                            >
                                                            > Dave

                                                            Reasonably sure. But I wouldn't go overboard with it. The less the
                                                            edging is able to stretch the less it will go along smoothly with the
                                                            syl-nylon. You could get into compatibility misbehaviors like
                                                            rucking along the edging and uneven pull in the stitching. But it's
                                                            something to consider anyway. (It's not even worth bothering about
                                                            in the heavier nylon fabric traditionally used for tarp-making.)

                                                            Doug Frost
                                                          • Bill Fornshell
                                                            Mirage, I have been thinking about getting .Mac. I would have to upgrade to Mac OS X something as I now run OS 9.1. That means buying the newest Mac OS
                                                            Message 29 of 30 , May 31, 2004
                                                              Mirage, I have been thinking about getting .Mac. I would have to
                                                              upgrade to Mac OS X something as I now run OS 9.1. That means buying
                                                              the newest Mac OS ($100+) and then subscribing to .Mac ($=?). I don't
                                                              have a web page or anything like it and what you did with the Gear
                                                              Making weekend looks nice. What is the "Journal" feature like?
                                                              Thanks. Bill

                                                              --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, "Mirage" <mirage@p...> wrote:
                                                              > I hosted my "Make Your Own Gear" day (weekend) this last weekend,
                                                              and boy did we
                                                              > work our butts off. Quilts on Sat, Tarps on Sunday 3 each during
                                                              10-12 hour days.
                                                              >
                                                              > Pics during construction and completed are posted at:
                                                              >
                                                              > http://homepage.mac.com/dbryans/DIYGear/PhotoAlbum1.html
                                                              >
                                                              > (trying out a trial .mac account, so bear with any errors or what-not).
                                                              >
                                                              > Shane "Mirage"...
                                                            • Mirage
                                                              ... buying ... don t ... Honestly, I ve only played with the homepage feature and while it s nice for integration with iPhoto and uploading albums, I ve not
                                                              Message 30 of 30 , May 31, 2004
                                                                --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, "Bill Fornshell"
                                                                <bfornshell@y...> wrote:
                                                                > Mirage, I have been thinking about getting .Mac. I would have to
                                                                > upgrade to Mac OS X something as I now run OS 9.1. That means
                                                                buying
                                                                > the newest Mac OS ($100+) and then subscribing to .Mac ($=?). I
                                                                don't
                                                                > have a web page or anything like it and what you did with the Gear
                                                                > Making weekend looks nice. What is the "Journal" feature like?
                                                                > Thanks. Bill

                                                                Honestly, I've only played with the "homepage" feature and while
                                                                it's nice for integration with iPhoto and uploading albums, I've not
                                                                played with the advanced features that let me edit html or upload my
                                                                own html content.

                                                                The "jury" is still out on it for me. The cost is $99.95 for a
                                                                year, which is not bad for hosting and the other features.

                                                                I have a Mac (OSX), WinXP, and Linux based computers at home, all of
                                                                which I use in various forms and manners. I can connect to my .mac
                                                                account from my WinXP and Linux computers via browser and can
                                                                connect to my iDisk data from both as mapped drives as well.

                                                                The trial is 60 days for free, minus some features, so give it a
                                                                shot. I didn't think it required a mac OSX to get an account, only
                                                                to integrate the iLife tools (iPhoto, iDisk, etc...)

                                                                Shane "Mirage"...
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