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  • shadesofblue33
    I m just curious, how do you handle storms/lightening. I know the basics of getting off an exposed ridge. How far off the ridge do you go to feel safe? If
    Message 1 of 14 , May 10, 2004
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      I'm just curious, how do you handle storms/lightening. I know the
      basics of getting off an exposed ridge. How far off the ridge do you
      go to feel safe? If the storm happens in the middle of the night, do
      you abandon camp, or strike camp and move to a lower elevation. Do
      you take a weather radio? Do you set up each camp keeping a possible
      storm in mind. Last year I usually pushed for a shelter, but since
      I've begun hammock camping....I really try to avoid shelters. By the
      way Ed.....your advice on keeping warm worked. My AT trip in mid
      April was really wet, but I was warm. The hammock was great.
    • Coy
      I dont have a pat answer but basically (if expecting storms) I try to avoid hanging from tall trees or close to tall trees. I try to avoid ridges and bluffs
      Message 2 of 14 , May 10, 2004
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        I dont have a pat answer but basically (if expecting storms) I try to
        avoid hanging from tall trees or close to tall trees. I try to avoid
        ridges and bluffs but this is difficult in many areas. I should
        leave all metal objects well away from my campsite ie hiking poles,
        pocket knife, pack frame etc... preferably in my pack coverd by a
        plastic garbage bag. That said I have slept through a few
        thunderstorms with my hiking poles leaning closeby and my pack under
        me. I do sometimes take a small radio, specially if expecting bad
        weather. I dont think it is big enough to attract lightning and I
        can keep abreast of the storms. I worry more about tronados than
        lightning though stats prove lightning is much more dangerious. But
        I can offset the lightning likelyhood. Tornados seem to have a mind
        of thier own. I have even read to avoid overhangs (large rocks or
        under bluffs) with a place to get under out of the rain. Something
        about the rocks mineral content attracting lightning. I got caught
        in a severe lightning storm once with several kids. We were swimming
        at the swimming hole. We hightailed it to a large overhang and
        watched the storm knock over small trees and saw ligtning hit one
        tree. Several parents waited in cars at the top of the bluff crying.
        We were about halfway down in the holler under our rock. We wanted to
        get home but the storm got really bad so we opted to seek the cover
        of the overhang. We started heading home when we first heard the
        thunder but it moved in real fast. No warnings were out when we left
        but there was a "chance of thunderstorms" in the forcast. But I have
        since taken one of the kids involved on a 3 day backpacking trip.
        The others have all returned to the holler so i guess no hard feeling
        were kept. They sure were scared (the parents) at the time. Sort of
        rambling here at the end. sorry

        Coy Boy

        --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, "shadesofblue33"
        <shadesofblue33@y...> wrote:
        > I'm just curious, how do you handle storms/lightening. I know the
        > basics of getting off an exposed ridge. How far off the ridge do
        you
        > go to feel safe? If the storm happens in the middle of the night,
        do
        > you abandon camp, or strike camp and move to a lower elevation. Do
        > you take a weather radio? Do you set up each camp keeping a
        possible
        > storm in mind. Last year I usually pushed for a shelter, but since
        > I've begun hammock camping....I really try to avoid shelters. By
        the
        > way Ed.....your advice on keeping warm worked. My AT trip in mid
        > April was really wet, but I was warm. The hammock was great.
      • Ed Speer
        Lightning, as always , is a very serious concern. I ve had trouble finding volunteers willing to test my hammocks in actual situations, so my advice is
        Message 3 of 14 , May 10, 2004
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          Lightning, as always , is a very serious concern. I've had trouble finding
          volunteers willing to test my hammocks in actual situations, so my advice is
          still--avoid all lightning! Electrocution is not the only danger--there is
          still a problem with falling trees or branches and potentially deadly
          schrapnel from a tree that explodes when hit by lightning. If you've ever
          seen such a tree explode, you know you don't want to be anywhere around at
          the time! I usually avoid danger spots like mountain tops and ridge lines
          during potentionaly bad storms, the farther off the top, the better. Of
          course, a sudden unexpected storm during the night is a different matter
          since I may have set up in a bad spot. Moving camp to a safe spot is wise,
          even after a storm arrives. That said, hammocks shouldn't be any more
          dangerous than ground sleeping. Anyone near a tree, rock or ground spot hit
          by lightning is in grave danger whether ground sleeping or hammocking, so
          the wise camper is the one who knows the danger and plans for the worst.

          Glad your hammock gear kept you warm on the AT last month--I'm envious and
          wish it were me. LOL! ....Ed Moderator, Hammock Camping-L


          > -----Original Message-----
          > From: shadesofblue33 [mailto:shadesofblue33@...]
          > Sent: Monday, May 10, 2004 10:34 AM
          > To: hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com
          > Subject: [Hammock Camping] storms
          >
          >
          > I'm just curious, how do you handle storms/lightening. I know the
          > basics of getting off an exposed ridge. How far off the ridge do you
          > go to feel safe? If the storm happens in the middle of the night, do
          > you abandon camp, or strike camp and move to a lower elevation. Do
          > you take a weather radio? Do you set up each camp keeping a possible
          > storm in mind. Last year I usually pushed for a shelter, but since
          > I've begun hammock camping....I really try to avoid shelters. By the
          > way Ed.....your advice on keeping warm worked. My AT trip in mid
          > April was really wet, but I was warm. The hammock was great.
        • Ralph Oborn
          I would like to respectivly disagree with COY, Lightning follows the path of least resistance between the clouds and the ground, air is a poor conductor, metal
          Message 4 of 14 , May 10, 2004
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            I would like to respectivly disagree with COY,


            Lightning follows the path of least resistance between the clouds
            and the ground, air is a poor conductor, metal and salty water
            solutions (skin full of blood, (people)) are good conductors, Wet
            wood is a fair conductor.

            Lightning is not attracted to metal like pocket knives unless it
            shortens the path between ground and cloud, which it doesn't in your
            pocket. If you were to stand on a bluff, holding your pocket knife
            high during a storm it might get hit, but even without the knife
            you'd probably get it.

            You can reduce risk by not hanging on ridge lines and peaks, not
            picking the tallest tree around (the one with the lightning scars)
            but don't worry about metal buckles or knives.

            If you pay attention, you can get lightning warning, those of you
            with hair will notice it starting to stand on end. Crouch down on a
            low spot immediatly, you are about to become part of the path.

            A car is one of the safest places to be, not because of the rubber
            tires as many believe, but because the metal body makes a "Faraday
            Cage" where all the charge goes on the outside surface.

            Ralph

            PS Many lightning bolts go up, not down.


            I should
            > leave all metal objects well away from my campsite ie hiking
            poles,
            > pocket knife, pack frame etc... preferably in my pack coverd by a
            > plastic garbage bag. That said I have slept through a few
            > thunderstorms with my hiking poles leaning closeby and my pack
            under
            > me.
          • Coy
            All depends on the size of your pocketknife. See photo I just uploaded to Coy Boys photo alblum. Coy Boy PS OK I admit it ain t exactly a pocketknife. I like
            Message 5 of 14 , May 10, 2004
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              All depends on the size of your pocketknife. See photo I just
              uploaded to Coy Boys photo alblum.

              Coy Boy
              PS OK I admit it ain't exactly a pocketknife. I like it though.



              --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, "Ralph Oborn"
              <polecatpop@y...> wrote:
              > I would like to respectivly disagree with COY,
              >
              >
              > Lightning follows the path of least resistance between the clouds
              > and the ground, air is a poor conductor, metal and salty water
              > solutions (skin full of blood, (people)) are good conductors, Wet
              > wood is a fair conductor.
              >
              > Lightning is not attracted to metal like pocket knives unless it
              > shortens the path between ground and cloud, which it doesn't in
              your
              > pocket. If you were to stand on a bluff, holding your pocket knife
              > high during a storm it might get hit, but even without the knife
              > you'd probably get it.
              >
              > You can reduce risk by not hanging on ridge lines and peaks, not
              > picking the tallest tree around (the one with the lightning scars)
              > but don't worry about metal buckles or knives.
              >
              > If you pay attention, you can get lightning warning, those of you
              > with hair will notice it starting to stand on end. Crouch down on a
              > low spot immediatly, you are about to become part of the path.
              >
              > A car is one of the safest places to be, not because of the rubber
              > tires as many believe, but because the metal body makes a "Faraday
              > Cage" where all the charge goes on the outside surface.
              >
              > Ralph
              >
              > PS Many lightning bolts go up, not down.
              >
              >
              > I should
              > > leave all metal objects well away from my campsite ie hiking
              > poles,
              > > pocket knife, pack frame etc... preferably in my pack coverd by a
              > > plastic garbage bag. That said I have slept through a few
              > > thunderstorms with my hiking poles leaning closeby and my pack
              > under
              > > me.
            • Ralph Oborn
              Ok, now I wanna see the pocket it fits in :] Ralph
              Message 6 of 14 , May 10, 2004
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                Ok, now I wanna see the pocket it fits in :]

                Ralph


                --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, "Coy" <starnescr@y...> wrote:
                > All depends on the size of your pocketknife. See photo I just
                > uploaded to Coy Boys photo alblum.
                >
                > Coy Boy
                > PS OK I admit it ain't exactly a pocketknife. I like it though.
                >
                >
                >
              • Coy
                I ll just add a cord through the lynard hole and wear it as a neck knife. Yep, should work out great. I ll report back on my findings. If I dont report back
                Message 7 of 14 , May 10, 2004
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                  I'll just add a cord through the lynard hole and wear it as a neck
                  knife. Yep, should work out great. I'll report back on my findings.
                  If I dont report back assume the worst. LOL

                  Coy Boy

                  --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, "Ralph Oborn"
                  <polecatpop@y...> wrote:
                  > Ok, now I wanna see the pocket it fits in :]
                  >
                  > Ralph
                  >
                  >
                  > --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, "Coy" <starnescr@y...> wrote:
                  > > All depends on the size of your pocketknife. See photo I just
                  > > uploaded to Coy Boys photo alblum.
                  > >
                  > > Coy Boy
                  > > PS OK I admit it ain't exactly a pocketknife. I like it though.
                  > >
                  > >
                  > >
                • Ralph Oborn
                  Ok, now I m thinking how long is that cord/ And where is that knife swinging? And whats in about that spot that might get cut? Yeah, thats about the worst.
                  Message 8 of 14 , May 10, 2004
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                    Ok, now I'm thinking how long is that cord/ And where is that knife
                    swinging? And whats in about that spot that might get cut?
                    Yeah, thats about the worst. :]
                    Ralph




                    --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, "Coy" <starnescr@y...> wrote:
                    > I'll just add a cord through the lynard hole and wear it as a neck
                    > knife. Yep, should work out great. I'll report back on my
                    findings.
                    > If I dont report back assume the worst. LOL
                    >
                    > Coy Boy
                    >
                    > --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, "Ralph Oborn"
                    > <polecatpop@y...> wrote:
                    > > Ok, now I wanna see the pocket it fits in :]
                    > >
                    > > Ralph
                    > >
                    > >
                    > > --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, "Coy" <starnescr@y...>
                    wrote:
                    > > > All depends on the size of your pocketknife. See photo I just
                    > > > uploaded to Coy Boys photo alblum.
                    > > >
                    > > > Coy Boy
                    > > > PS OK I admit it ain't exactly a pocketknife. I like it
                    though.
                    > > >
                    > > >
                    > > >
                  • Rick
                    ... I ve just been following this thread loosely. However, I pictured Coy sitting down and bending over to tie his shoes. Take some steri strips with you Coy.
                    Message 9 of 14 , May 11, 2004
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                      Ralph Oborn wrote:

                      >Ok, now I'm thinking how long is that cord/ And where is that knife
                      >swinging? And whats in about that spot that might get cut?
                      > Yeah, thats about the worst. :]
                      >Ralph
                      >
                      >
                      I've just been following this thread loosely. However, I pictured Coy
                      sitting down and bending over to tie his shoes.

                      Take some steri strips with you Coy.

                      Rick
                    • dlfrost_1
                      ... finding ... advice is ... there is ... deadly ... you ve ever ... around at ... Besides being electrocuted or fragged, the other danger is having your
                      Message 10 of 14 , May 11, 2004
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                        --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, "Ed Speer" <info@s...> wrote:
                        > Lightning, as always , is a very serious concern. I've had trouble
                        finding
                        > volunteers willing to test my hammocks in actual situations, so my
                        advice is
                        > still--avoid all lightning! Electrocution is not the only danger--
                        there is
                        > still a problem with falling trees or branches and potentially
                        deadly
                        > schrapnel from a tree that explodes when hit by lightning. If
                        you've ever
                        > seen such a tree explode, you know you don't want to be anywhere
                        around at
                        > the time!

                        Besides being electrocuted or fragged, the other danger is having
                        your hearing damaged by sound concussion. (People have even had
                        their ear drums blown out.) By the time you realize you're in the
                        strike zone there's not much you can do. But you can clip off two
                        small bits of packtowel to plug your ears. Or some tissue will do.

                        Bear take-out bag, wilderness body bag... hammocks are so versatile!
                        ;-)

                        Doug Frost
                      • Ralph Oborn
                        I ve heard it cures baldness Sign me up :] Ralph I ve had trouble finding volunteers willing to test my hammocks in actual situations, so my advice is ...
                        Message 11 of 14 , May 11, 2004
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                          I've heard it cures baldness
                          Sign me up :]

                          Ralph

                          I've had trouble finding volunteers willing to test my hammocks
                          in actual situations, so my advice is
                          > > still--avoid all lightning! Electrocution is not the only
                          danger--
                          > there is
                          > > still a problem with falling trees or branches and potentially
                          > deadly
                          >


                          > Besides being electrocuted or fragged, the other danger is having
                          > your hearing damaged by sound concussion. (People have even had
                          > their ear drums blown out.) By the time you realize you're in the
                          > strike zone there's not much you can do. But you can clip off two
                          > small bits of packtowel to plug your ears. Or some tissue will do.
                          >
                          > Bear take-out bag, wilderness body bag... hammocks are so
                          versatile!
                          > ;-)
                          >
                          > Doug Frost
                        • Chuck Haak
                          After tenting one night next to a chainsaw snorer, I added foam earplugs to my equipment list. They weight approximately nothing and can sure help you get a
                          Message 12 of 14 , May 11, 2004
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                            After tenting one night next to a chainsaw snorer, I added foam earplugs
                            to my equipment list. They weight approximately nothing and can sure
                            help you get a good night's sleep. I hammocked next to an old fashioned
                            hydro power plant one night and hardly heard a thing.

                            Pbmoo4



                            Besides being electrocuted or fragged, the other danger is having
                            your hearing damaged by sound concussion. (People have even had
                            their ear drums blown out.) By the time you realize you're in the
                            strike zone there's not much you can do. But you can clip off two
                            small bits of packtowel to plug your ears. Or some tissue will do.

                            Bear take-out bag, wilderness body bag... hammocks are so versatile!
                            ;-)

                            Doug Frost
                          • chcoa
                            Would it be possible to use these (foam earplugs) as emergency fire starter material? I wonder how flamable they are and how long they would burn? jamie in az
                            Message 13 of 14 , May 16, 2004
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                              Would it be possible to use these (foam earplugs) as emergency fire
                              starter material? I wonder how flamable they are and how long they
                              would burn?

                              jamie in az


                              --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, "Chuck Haak" <chuckhaak@t...>
                              wrote:
                              > After tenting one night next to a chainsaw snorer, I added foam
                              earplugs
                              > to my equipment list. They weight approximately nothing and can sure
                              > help you get a good night's sleep. I hammocked next to an old
                              fashioned
                              > hydro power plant one night and hardly heard a thing.
                              >
                              > Pbmoo4
                              >
                            • ciyd01
                              I suppose it would depend on how much ear wax was in them ;-) Sorry, couldn t resist. ciyd
                              Message 14 of 14 , May 16, 2004
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                                I suppose it would depend on how much ear wax was in them ;-)

                                Sorry, couldn't resist.

                                ciyd

                                --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, "chcoa" <jdeben@h...> wrote:
                                > Would it be possible to use these (foam earplugs) as emergency fire
                                > starter material? I wonder how flamable they are and how long they
                                > would burn?
                                >
                                > jamie in az
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