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Re: Mirage's Under/Over quilt ... and Tyvek tarp

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  • Mirage
    Last night I got the last few hours I needed to REALLY finish my down quilt. Final weight was 33.3 oz, NOT including stuff sack. I might get pics tonight, but
    Message 1 of 32 , Mar 24, 2004
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      Last night I got the last few hours I needed to REALLY finish my
      down quilt.

      Final weight was 33.3 oz, NOT including stuff sack.

      I might get pics tonight, but may have to wait until after this
      weekends Semi-Official PNWHH (upgraded from unofficial with Ed's
      permission, yet somehow w/out Ed there I'm sure it's not OFFICIAL ;).

      I also had a chance this morning to work on a MacCat style tarp made
      from Tyvek. I'll sew on (rig up) my gros-grain tie-outs tonight and
      test it out.

      Speaking of Tyvek, I bought a 100ft roll, so if you need some, let
      me know how much you want for $1/ft (9ft wide), including shipping.

      Don't worry Brian, my order with you still stands, I'm just testing
      our agreed dimesions and needed a tarp for this weekends Semi-
      Official PNWHH.

      Shane "Mirage"...

      --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, "Mirage" <mirage@p...> wrote:
      > Well, I finally got a whole day to work on stuffing down into my
      > under/over quilt. Boy, was that fun ;) 8P
      >
      > I now have to complete sewing up that long edge and I will finally
      > be done with this long awaited project. Should be ready for this
      > weekend.
      >
      > So here is the list of under/over quilts I have completed to date
      > (or nearly ;):
      >
      > 1. 0.4" (60gr) Primaloft Sport, single layer, Micro Denier ripstop
      > innder shell, silnylon outer shell, 76"x41"
      > (http://tinyurl.com/2shd2)
      >
      > 2. 0.8" (133gr) Primaloft Sport, double layer (~1.6" total loft),
      > 1.1oz ripstop inner shell, 1.3oz EPIC outer shell, ~85"x54",
      > 2lb,10oz (http://tinyurl.com/2cot5)
      >
      > 3. 11oz (~750FP) down, trapazoidally baffled (2+" loft), 1.1oz
      > ripstop inner shell, 1.3oz EPIC outer shell, ~85"x54", ~2lb,2oz
      (no
      > pics posted yet)
      >
      > I suppose I should count my first one I made outa Muslin, based on
      > the thru-hiker HH underquilt pattern, but I never produced one
      from
      > this pattern out of production grade fabrics and bailed on that
      > design in favor of the under/over quilt that I am no doing.
      >
      > These last two are really designed for multi purpose use and as
      > such, sacrifice weight for function. They can be used as an
      > underquilt in the same manner as Ed's PeaPod, as an over quilt in
      > the hammock or on the ground, or as a traditional sleeping bag.
      > They can even be worn in camp (as can Ed's PeaPod) as a form
      > of "jacket". The basic design turns out to be very similar to the
      > Nunatack BCP (http://tinyurl.com/yyk3). Mine weights about 6oz
      > more, and not sure why, other than possible over engineering on my
      > part?
      >
      > I will be bringing all of these to the "Unofficialy PNW Hammock
      > Hangers Campout" (UPNWHHC) this weekend up on Mary's Peak,
      Oregon.
      > I will have both my Speer/Risk hammock and my HH Asym, and maybe
      > another I've been noodling about.
      >
      > Sounds like we might have one other list member join us for the
      > campout, and I've got several ground sleepers comming along who I
      > will try to get into a hammock for the night. I'd love to see
      > others of you join us if you can.
      >
      > I'll post again when I have pics of the down under/overquilt
      posted.
      >
      > Shane "Mirage"...
    • Admin
      Well, I actually find the hanging method to be quite easy. I use rolled kraft paper for my patterns and a lightweight metal decorative chain purchased at a
      Message 32 of 32 , Jan 20, 2005
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        Well, I actually find the hanging method to be quite easy. I use rolled kraft paper for my
        patterns and a lightweight metal decorative chain purchased at a home improvement
        warehouse. Instead of relying on a wall that's as long as I need for the curve, I have a 1" x
        12" x 10' board that I use to put everything on (I store it against the wall behind the couch
        in the living room so it's out of the way and out of sight when not in use). I cut the paper
        into strips 10 inches wide (the paper comes in 30" width), and use 2 spring-loaded clamps
        ($3 each) to hold the paper to the board. Then I measure the center point, how far down I
        want the curve to go, and mark where I want the chain to hang. Open one clamp slightly
        and slide one end of the chain under it. Pull the chain until it is as taut as it needs to be
        for the curve, stick it under the other clamp, and trace the line. Setup time is about 5
        minutes and drawing the curve takes another minute. It's also very easy to adjust the
        chain.

        Not knocking the templates. I just wanted to share that it can be done easily with the
        right supplies.

        -howie

        --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, "zippydooda" <zippydooda@y...> wrote:
        >
        > Having finally done this last night, I gotta say that the templates,
        > or at least the X-Y coordinates, are the way to go. Being one who
        > did not like the template idea, I hung the fabric on the wall, spent
        > quite a while trying to get it level and straight and keep it from
        > sagging too much between the support points, and all that, and then
        > trying to dangle a rope, figuring out it was too heavy, and then
        > dangling a thread so I could mark out some points and play connect
        > the dots.
        >
        > It would have been MUCH easier to use the spreadsheet and then mark
        > out several dots, and then connect them with the ruler.
        >
        > Gravity is NOT your friend - once you get the material off the floor,
        > bad stuff starts to happen. In a fitting bit of irony, you get
        > little catenary curves between your support points that cause
        > headaches when you are trying to make your nice big cat curve.
        >
        > Now to sew along the line...
        >
        > Bill in Houston
        >
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