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Risk's Double Bottom Hammock

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  • matthulbert
    I m about to embark on making another hammock and have been reading Risk s great experiments (thanks Risk!). I think the double bottom hammock (for a place for
    Message 1 of 19 , Mar 9 9:37 AM
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      I'm about to embark on making another hammock and have been reading
      Risk's great experiments (thanks Risk!).

      I think the double bottom hammock (for a place for the pad) sounds
      really good, especially with his results with the overlapped target
      pads. I think I'll make a travelpod, too, so that I can use this
      hammock in various temperatures using a variation of pads, bug nets
      and the travelpod.

      So my question is this:
      I'm going to make the double bottom one (not Risk's newest one with
      insulation). Risk had used the 1.1 oz fabric on his. I'd like to use
      the 1.1 oz to save weight (since there's two layers). I get the
      feeling that Risk didn't use his 1.1 oz hammock enough to test it's
      strength (cause he was making about a hammock a week at that point).

      Is the 1.1 oz strong enough? What's the consensus on this? Risk?
      Anybody? I only weigh about 165, but I'm not obsessed with weight. So
      I could use 1.9 oz, it just seems like it would be fine for my use.

      I like my HH, but here in the NW, it's pretty cold (for hammocking
      anyway) so I think I'll keep that for summer use and use this new
      hammock the rest of the year. Every trip I took last year had nights
      in the high 30s to low 40s, regardless of the time of year.

      Thanks all!
    • ra1@imrisk.com
      ... You re welcome! ... I have used the 1.1 oz double bottom hammock more than any other hammock. I have spent about 30 nights in it. It is very strong. It
      Message 2 of 19 , Mar 9 9:51 AM
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        Quoting matthulbert <ms@...>:

        > I'm about to embark on making another hammock and have been reading
        > Risk's great experiments (thanks Risk!).

        You're welcome!
        >
        > I'm going to make the double bottom one (not Risk's newest one with
        > insulation). Risk had used the 1.1 oz fabric on his. I'd like to use
        > the 1.1 oz to save weight (since there's two layers). I get the
        > feeling that Risk didn't use his 1.1 oz hammock enough to test it's
        > strength (cause he was making about a hammock a week at that point).
        >
        > Is the 1.1 oz strong enough? What's the consensus on this? Risk?
        > Anybody? I only weigh about 165, but I'm not obsessed with weight. So
        > I could use 1.9 oz, it just seems like it would be fine for my use.
        >
        I have used the 1.1 oz double bottom hammock more than any other hammock. I
        have spent about 30 nights in it. It is very strong. It has not begun to fray
        or separate or otherwise begin to look like it is wearing at all. I will
        probably be going back to it for spring/summer use.

        I weigh just under 200 pounds.

        Of course, I am obsessed with weight. That is one reason I trim my hammocks to 4
        feet wide. You could make a double bottom hammock out of 1.9 oz nylon. I have
        hung out with my wife in one several times. It easily holds 350 pounds.
        However, it is way overengineered for one sleeper.

        risk
      • matthulbert
        Risk, does the 4ft width change any other characteristics of the hammock? Does it wrap around you less and lay a little flatter? I was thinking of doing the
        Message 3 of 19 , Mar 9 10:31 AM
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          Risk, does the 4ft width change any other characteristics of the
          hammock? Does it wrap around you less and lay a little flatter?

          I was thinking of doing the bugnet old style (speer, with velcro) so I
          only have to use it when I need it. My hennessy has the built-in net
          and it seems to be nice to have a hammock without one, especially in
          colder weather when I don't need it. Do you like the net built-in better?

          Thanks.

          --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, ra1@i... wrote:
          > Quoting matthulbert <ms@u...>:
          >
          > > I'm about to embark on making another hammock and have been reading
          > > Risk's great experiments (thanks Risk!).
          >
          > You're welcome!
          > >
          > > I'm going to make the double bottom one (not Risk's newest one with
          > > insulation). Risk had used the 1.1 oz fabric on his. I'd like to use
          > > the 1.1 oz to save weight (since there's two layers). I get the
          > > feeling that Risk didn't use his 1.1 oz hammock enough to test it's
          > > strength (cause he was making about a hammock a week at that point).
          > >
          > > Is the 1.1 oz strong enough? What's the consensus on this? Risk?
          > > Anybody? I only weigh about 165, but I'm not obsessed with weight. So
          > > I could use 1.9 oz, it just seems like it would be fine for my use.
          > >
          > I have used the 1.1 oz double bottom hammock more than any other
          hammock. I
          > have spent about 30 nights in it. It is very strong. It has not
          begun to fray
          > or separate or otherwise begin to look like it is wearing at all. I
          will
          > probably be going back to it for spring/summer use.
          >
          > I weigh just under 200 pounds.
          >
          > Of course, I am obsessed with weight. That is one reason I trim my
          hammocks to 4
          > feet wide. You could make a double bottom hammock out of 1.9 oz
          nylon. I have
          > hung out with my wife in one several times. It easily holds 350
          pounds.
          > However, it is way overengineered for one sleeper.
          >
          > risk
        • David Chinell
          Hey Risk: When you trim the width to four feet, do you find the mosquito net hangs poorly? What s your latest favorite way to rig the net? Bear
          Message 4 of 19 , Mar 9 10:55 AM
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            Hey Risk:

            When you trim the width to four feet, do you find the
            mosquito net hangs poorly? What's your latest favorite way
            to rig the net?

            Bear
          • ra1@imrisk.com
            ... I started using it because it is lighter. I now love the narrower width because I can see out of it while laying down when I want to. The most
            Message 5 of 19 , Mar 9 10:57 AM
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              Quoting matthulbert <ms@...>:

              > Risk, does the 4ft width change any other characteristics of the
              > hammock? Does it wrap around you less and lay a little flatter?

              I started using it because it is lighter. I now love the narrower width because
              I can see out of it while laying down when I want to. The most comfortable
              position is with feet on one side of the midline, and head on the other side.
              If I really move my head far to one side, then the hammock warps in such a way
              that I am looking out of it sideways.

              However, in general, it lays about the same... just with a little less "taco"
              feeling.
              >
              > I was thinking of doing the bugnet old style (speer, with velcro) so I
              > only have to use it when I need it. My hennessy has the built-in net
              > and it seems to be nice to have a hammock without one, especially in
              > colder weather when I don't need it. Do you like the net built-in better?

              I like the built in bug net, but am experimenting with a separate bug net. This
              one is not velcro attached. It hangs from a sewn in grosgrain ribbon along the
              middle of the long length. This ribbon is tied/attached to loops on the webbing
              straps. The net closes on both sides of the hammock by gravity. The other way
              it can be used is to tie the grosgrain to tabs of the tarp. I have not tested
              enough to be a believer in this for the hammock, but it would work nicely as a
              bug net for nights under the tarp, sleeping on grass when the hammock was not
              used.
              >
              I don't have pictures of these ideas up yet. I have not done enough
              experimenting to know if I like it yet.

              OBTW, if the bug net works well attached to the tarp, then using TarpTubes to
              furl the tarp and bug net would be a great time saver.

              Y'all always give me so much to think of, to try, and to report on! It is
              wonderful. Thanks for the interest.

              Rick
            • ra1@imrisk.com
              ... Hi David, I have mostly used the quarterweight net arrangement with 4 foot width hammocks. I do have limited experience with one 5 foot width hammock and
              Message 6 of 19 , Mar 9 11:04 AM
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                Quoting David Chinell <dchinell@...>:

                > Hey Risk:
                >
                > When you trim the width to four feet, do you find the
                > mosquito net hangs poorly? What's your latest favorite way
                > to rig the net?

                Hi David,

                I have mostly used the quarterweight net arrangement with 4 foot width hammocks.
                I do have limited experience with one 5 foot width hammock and the
                quarterweight net. It seems to work the same.
                >
                For another method see the post I just put up. It is very early in the
                experimental track. I would have been faster working on it, but daily checks
                for nasty biting bugs here in Dayton have been fruitless since October.

                ;)

                Risk
              • matthulbert
                I don t like the taco effect much. So I think I ll trim mine, too. I don t care that much about the little bit of weight. But anytime I can lose some weight
                Message 7 of 19 , Mar 9 11:21 AM
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                  I don't like the taco effect much. So I think I'll trim mine, too. I
                  don't care that much about the little bit of weight. But anytime I can
                  lose some weight without harm I'll take it.

                  I hate fiddling with stuff (apparently an affliction you don't have!).
                  So I'd like to keep the bugnet attach/detach as simple as possible.
                  That's a nice thing about the Hennesey. But having a bugnet so close
                  to my face isn't all that great. It would be nice if it were higher.

                  The Hennesey method for attaching the tarp is great, though. Really
                  smart setup.

                  It would be nice to have that same type of attachment for the bugnet
                  (but keep the tarp seperate for all the benefits previously mentioned)
                  so it could be put on without fussing with stings or knots.

                  You could sew a tube or tunnel on the centerline of the netting and
                  run a bungie-type cord down the middle and have hooks on each end.
                  Then attach the hooks to hooks attached to the hanging straps. The
                  netting would then hang as it does in many of your designs.

                  The bugnet could be installed in less than 10 seconds! I think I'll
                  have to do that!


                  --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, ra1@i... wrote:
                  > Quoting matthulbert <ms@u...>:
                  >
                  > > Risk, does the 4ft width change any other characteristics of the
                  > > hammock? Does it wrap around you less and lay a little flatter?
                  >
                  > I started using it because it is lighter. I now love the narrower
                  width because
                  > I can see out of it while laying down when I want to. The most
                  comfortable
                  > position is with feet on one side of the midline, and head on the
                  other side.
                  > If I really move my head far to one side, then the hammock warps in
                  such a way
                  > that I am looking out of it sideways.
                  >
                  > However, in general, it lays about the same... just with a little
                  less "taco"
                  > feeling.
                  > >
                  > > I was thinking of doing the bugnet old style (speer, with velcro) so I
                  > > only have to use it when I need it. My hennessy has the built-in net
                  > > and it seems to be nice to have a hammock without one, especially in
                  > > colder weather when I don't need it. Do you like the net built-in
                  better?
                  >
                  > I like the built in bug net, but am experimenting with a separate
                  bug net. This
                  > one is not velcro attached. It hangs from a sewn in grosgrain
                  ribbon along the
                  > middle of the long length. This ribbon is tied/attached to loops on
                  the webbing
                  > straps. The net closes on both sides of the hammock by gravity.
                  The other way
                  > it can be used is to tie the grosgrain to tabs of the tarp. I have
                  not tested
                  > enough to be a believer in this for the hammock, but it would work
                  nicely as a
                  > bug net for nights under the tarp, sleeping on grass when the
                  hammock was not
                  > used.
                  > >
                  > I don't have pictures of these ideas up yet. I have not done enough
                  > experimenting to know if I like it yet.
                  >
                  > OBTW, if the bug net works well attached to the tarp, then using
                  TarpTubes to
                  > furl the tarp and bug net would be a great time saver.
                  >
                  > Y'all always give me so much to think of, to try, and to report on!
                  It is
                  > wonderful. Thanks for the interest.
                  >
                  > Rick
                • Chet Clocksin
                  My latest hammock is a double bottom 1.1 oz ripstop, similar to Risk s. I have only done a limited amount of testing with it, but It sure seems strong enough.
                  Message 8 of 19 , Mar 9 3:21 PM
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                    My latest hammock is a double bottom 1.1 oz ripstop, similar to Risk's. I have only done a limited amount of testing with it, but It sure seems strong enough. I weigh about 225 lbs., and I have no reservations about its strength. Good luck on the travel pod, seems like a great idea ( risk seems to have a lot of those...great ideas that is).
                     
                    Chet 
                    -----Original Message-----
                    From: matthulbert [mailto:ms@...]
                    Sent: Tuesday, March 09, 2004 12:37 PM
                    To: hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com
                    Subject: [Hammock Camping] Risk's Double Bottom Hammock

                    I'm about to embark on making another hammock and have been reading
                    Risk's great experiments (thanks Risk!).

                    I think the double bottom hammock (for a place for the pad) sounds
                    really good, especially with his results with the overlapped target
                    pads. I think I'll make a travelpod, too, so that I can use this
                    hammock in various temperatures using a variation of pads, bug nets
                    and the travelpod.

                    So my question is this:
                    I'm going to make the double bottom one (not Risk's newest one with
                    insulation). Risk had used the 1.1 oz fabric on his. I'd like to use
                    the 1.1 oz to save weight (since there's two layers). I get the
                    feeling that Risk didn't use his 1.1 oz hammock enough to test it's
                    strength (cause he was making about a hammock a week at that point).

                    Is the 1.1 oz strong enough? What's the consensus on this? Risk?
                    Anybody? I only weigh about 165, but I'm not obsessed with weight. So
                    I could use 1.9 oz, it just seems like it would be fine for my use.

                    I like my HH, but here in the NW, it's pretty cold (for hammocking
                    anyway) so I think I'll keep that for summer use and use this new
                    hammock the rest of the year. Every trip I took last year had nights
                    in the high 30s to low 40s, regardless of the time of year.

                    Thanks all!

                  • Rick
                    ... Thanks Chet, but you should see the list of my bad ideas--well--less worthy ideas... Here are a few: - aluminum wood burning stove (melted) - 1.1 oz
                    Message 9 of 19 , Mar 9 4:10 PM
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                      Chet Clocksin wrote:
                      My latest hammock is a double bottom 1.1 oz ripstop, similar to Risk's. I have only done a limited amount of testing with it, but It sure seems strong enough. I weigh about 225 lbs., and I have no reservations about its strength. Good luck on the travel pod, seems like a great idea ( risk seems to have a lot of those...great ideas that is).
                       
                      Thanks Chet, but you should see the list of my bad ideas--well--less worthy ideas...
                      Here are a few:
                      - aluminum wood burning stove  (melted)
                      - 1.1 oz ripstop gaiters   (fragile)
                      -  tyvek gaiters  (ugly)
                      -  home-made nylon shorts of 1.1 oz light green ripstop  (semi transparent)
                      - bugnet made of chiffon (absorbs water)
                      - hammock overbag - no quilt inside (froze my buns off)

                      The list goes on...

                      Fortunately, I only need to publish the ones that work. 

                      Risk
                    • Ralph Oborn
                      Since your failure list looks like my to do list, I d like to see more. Maybe it will save me some time or I can improve them? Ralph ... but It ... seems ...
                      Message 10 of 19 , Mar 9 6:47 PM
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                        Since your failure list looks like my to do list, I'd like to see
                        more. Maybe it will save me some time or I can improve them?

                        Ralph

                        --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, Rick <ra1@i...> wrote:
                        > Chet Clocksin wrote:
                        >
                        > > My latest hammock is a double bottom 1.1 oz ripstop, similar to
                        > > Risk's. I have only done a limited amount of testing with it,
                        but It
                        > > sure seems strong enough. I weigh about 225 lbs., and I have no
                        > > reservations about its strength. Good luck on the travel pod,
                        seems
                        > > like a great idea ( risk seems to have a lot of those...great
                        ideas
                        > > that is).
                        > >
                        >
                        > Thanks Chet, but you should see the list of my bad ideas--well--
                        less
                        > worthy ideas...
                        > Here are a few:
                        > - aluminum wood burning stove (melted)
                        > - 1.1 oz ripstop gaiters (fragile)
                        > - tyvek gaiters (ugly)
                        > - home-made nylon shorts of 1.1 oz light green ripstop (semi
                        transparent)
                        > - bugnet made of chiffon (absorbs water)
                        > - hammock overbag - no quilt inside (froze my buns off)
                        >
                        > The list goes on...
                        >
                        > Fortunately, I only need to publish the ones that work.
                        >
                        > Risk
                      • Debra Weisenstein
                        I did a bug net similar to what Rick describes. There are a couple pictures in the photo section. There is a sew-in gross-grain ribbon for a ridgeline. I
                        Message 11 of 19 , Mar 10 5:03 AM
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                          I did a bug net similar to what Rick describes. There are a couple
                          pictures in the photo section. There is a sew-in gross-grain ribbon
                          for a ridgeline. I originally tied the bug net ridgeline to the
                          trees, but then found it worked better attached to the hammock webbing
                          loops by short elastic cords. I put strips of velcro on the ends to
                          seal around the hammock straps and 4 pockets on the bottom edges to
                          hold some weights so the netting would hang taught and keep out the
                          bugs. I used a 5 foot width of netting. This bug net was never
                          really as bug proof as I would have liked. Probably just didn't get a
                          good seal around the hammock sides even with the weights added.

                          I've got 2 new ideas to try for bug netting. Bought an Adventure 16
                          bug bivy, which is meant for sleeping under a tarp or in a lean-to.
                          Seems to work in the hammock also, since the frame is quite flexible
                          and you lay on a piece of netting near the top to anchor it. My other
                          idea is a hammock "shirt" net, which would cover the top 1/3 of the
                          hammock and slide up along the ridgeline when getting in and out.
                          This would completely enclose the hammock with a drawcord at chest
                          level. Maybe it would keep the buzzing bugs further from the bottom
                          of the hammock and my ears.

                          DebW

                          --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, ra1@i... wrote:
                          > Quoting matthulbert <ms@u...>:
                          >
                          > > I was thinking of doing the bugnet old style (speer, with velcro) so I
                          > > only have to use it when I need it. My hennessy has the built-in net
                          > > and it seems to be nice to have a hammock without one, especially in
                          > > colder weather when I don't need it. Do you like the net built-in
                          better?
                          >
                          > I like the built in bug net, but am experimenting with a separate
                          bug net. This
                          > one is not velcro attached. It hangs from a sewn in grosgrain
                          ribbon along the
                          > middle of the long length. This ribbon is tied/attached to loops on
                          the webbing
                          > straps. The net closes on both sides of the hammock by gravity.
                          The other way
                          > it can be used is to tie the grosgrain to tabs of the tarp. I have
                          not tested
                          > enough to be a believer in this for the hammock, but it would work
                          nicely as a
                          > bug net for nights under the tarp, sleeping on grass when the
                          hammock was not
                          > used.
                          > >
                          > I don't have pictures of these ideas up yet. I have not done enough
                          > experimenting to know if I like it yet.
                          >
                          > OBTW, if the bug net works well attached to the tarp, then using
                          TarpTubes to
                          > furl the tarp and bug net would be a great time saver.
                          >
                          > Y'all always give me so much to think of, to try, and to report on!
                          It is
                          > wonderful. Thanks for the interest.
                          >
                          > Rick
                        • Dave Womble
                          Deb, Some of the worst skitters that I can recall were along the southern section of the AT in your home state (no offense intended, Mt Greylock is a gem).
                          Message 12 of 19 , Mar 10 6:12 AM
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                            Deb,

                            Some of the worst 'skitters that I can recall were along the southern
                            section of the AT in your home state (no offense intended, Mt
                            Greylock is a gem). If your netting can keep them at bay, then it
                            would be good enough for me. It is one thing to have netting that
                            keeps out the occasional 'skitter, it is another thing to have
                            netting that keeps them out when there are hungry swarms. I recall
                            using an 8'x10' tarp with a single hanging point mosquitto net.
                            Nothing to it when there was just a few 'skitters. But when I was in
                            serious 'skitter country it was a little scary. You had to make sure
                            every inch of netting was sealed off and that none of it rested
                            against your bare skin (it is often hot and you don't want to wear
                            warm clothing). And then there was the middle of the night pee
                            break... when I turned on my light they were lining the inside of my
                            tarp, mostly at the headend where they were getting all worked up
                            from my exhaled breath. My stategy then was to crawl in/out the foot
                            end and to be quick about it. The point I am trying to make is:
                            the 'skitter protection that you use for sleeping had best be very
                            good because when there is a squarm of them they will try all night
                            long to get at you and if there is a weakness in your scheme, they
                            will probably find it and you might not know about it until you wake
                            up and notice the bites. Also, it helps to be able to open/close it
                            quickly... you can't call time-out and have them wait until you are
                            ready. One last comment, you might sleep better if you KNOW they
                            can't get to you.

                            Youngblood


                            --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, "Debra Weisenstein"
                            <dweisens@a...> wrote:
                            > I did a bug net similar to what Rick describes. There are a couple
                            > pictures in the photo section. There is a sew-in gross-grain ribbon
                            > for a ridgeline. I originally tied the bug net ridgeline to the
                            > trees, but then found it worked better attached to the hammock
                            webbing
                            > loops by short elastic cords. I put strips of velcro on the ends to
                            > seal around the hammock straps and 4 pockets on the bottom edges to
                            > hold some weights so the netting would hang taught and keep out the
                            > bugs. I used a 5 foot width of netting. This bug net was never
                            > really as bug proof as I would have liked. Probably just didn't
                            get a
                            > good seal around the hammock sides even with the weights added.
                            >
                            > I've got 2 new ideas to try for bug netting. Bought an Adventure 16
                            > bug bivy, which is meant for sleeping under a tarp or in a lean-to.
                            > Seems to work in the hammock also, since the frame is quite flexible
                            > and you lay on a piece of netting near the top to anchor it. My
                            other
                            > idea is a hammock "shirt" net, which would cover the top 1/3 of the
                            > hammock and slide up along the ridgeline when getting in and out.
                            > This would completely enclose the hammock with a drawcord at chest
                            > level. Maybe it would keep the buzzing bugs further from the bottom
                            > of the hammock and my ears.
                            >
                            > DebW
                            >
                            > --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, ra1@i... wrote:
                            > > Quoting matthulbert <ms@u...>:
                            > >
                            > > > I was thinking of doing the bugnet old style (speer, with
                            velcro) so I
                            > > > only have to use it when I need it. My hennessy has the built-
                            in net
                            > > > and it seems to be nice to have a hammock without one,
                            especially in
                            > > > colder weather when I don't need it. Do you like the net built-
                            in
                            > better?
                            > >
                            > > I like the built in bug net, but am experimenting with a separate
                            > bug net. This
                            > > one is not velcro attached. It hangs from a sewn in grosgrain
                            > ribbon along the
                            > > middle of the long length. This ribbon is tied/attached to loops
                            on
                            > the webbing
                            > > straps. The net closes on both sides of the hammock by gravity.
                            > The other way
                            > > it can be used is to tie the grosgrain to tabs of the tarp. I
                            have
                            > not tested
                            > > enough to be a believer in this for the hammock, but it would work
                            > nicely as a
                            > > bug net for nights under the tarp, sleeping on grass when the
                            > hammock was not
                            > > used.
                            > > >
                            > > I don't have pictures of these ideas up yet. I have not done
                            enough
                            > > experimenting to know if I like it yet.
                            > >
                            > > OBTW, if the bug net works well attached to the tarp, then using
                            > TarpTubes to
                            > > furl the tarp and bug net would be a great time saver.
                            > >
                            > > Y'all always give me so much to think of, to try, and to report
                            on!
                            > It is
                            > > wonderful. Thanks for the interest.
                            > >
                            > > Rick
                          • David Chinell
                            Youngblood: I m in Florida. Most of the mosquitoes I encounter, whether few or in swarms, are pretty dull-witted. Those that do make it inside my netting seem
                            Message 13 of 19 , Mar 10 8:45 AM
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                              Youngblood:

                              I'm in Florida. Most of the mosquitoes I encounter, whether
                              few or in swarms, are pretty dull-witted. Those that do make
                              it inside my netting seem to forget all about biting me and
                              get preoccupied with escaping.

                              I hang a big piece of tulle from a ridgeline and clip it
                              shut at both ends. So I have a narrow tent of tulle that
                              reaches from about three feet above me down to the ground.

                              The mosquitoes' sole escape strategy seems to be to fly over
                              the top of obstacles. So they all end up at the very peak of
                              my netting trying, until their eventual doom, to find a way
                              over the top. In the morning I squish them by clapping all
                              along the ridgeline and letting them fall out the bottom.
                              (Yes, yes! I enjoy it, I admit it!)

                              The only real problem I've had with mosquitoes was
                              discovering (the hard way) that my HH ultra light bottom
                              fabric wasn't mosquito-proof.

                              Bear
                            • Risk
                              ... It is absolutely DebW s idea which I described. I am playing with the idea myself now. Rick
                              Message 14 of 19 , Mar 10 11:46 AM
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                                --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, "Debra Weisenstein"
                                <dweisens@a...> wrote:
                                > I did a bug net similar to what Rick describes.

                                It is absolutely DebW's idea which I described. I am playing with the
                                idea myself now.

                                Rick
                              • Debra Weisenstein
                                One flaw in my design was putting the netting pockets for weights in a position where they kept the netting from lying flush against the sides of the hammock
                                Message 15 of 19 , Mar 10 1:08 PM
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                                  One flaw in my design was putting the netting pockets for weights in a
                                  position where they kept the netting from lying flush against the
                                  sides of the hammock when three-dimensional objects were inserted. So
                                  either keep the pockets shallow or lengthen the netting on the sides.

                                  DebW

                                  --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, "Risk" <ra1@i...> wrote:
                                  > --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, "Debra Weisenstein"
                                  > <dweisens@a...> wrote:
                                  > > I did a bug net similar to what Rick describes.
                                  >
                                  > It is absolutely DebW's idea which I described. I am playing with the
                                  > idea myself now.
                                  >
                                  > Rick
                                • quiltpatti
                                  I liked the looks of the net on this site: http://www.hammockbliss.safeshopper.com//19/cat19.htm?672 So I copied it. I sometimes sleep with body parts hanging
                                  Message 16 of 19 , Aug 16, 2005
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                                    I liked the looks of the net on this site:

                                    http://www.hammockbliss.safeshopper.com//19/cat19.htm?672

                                    So I copied it. I sometimes sleep with body parts hanging over the
                                    hammock sides and this design gives me more freedom. I used the
                                    0.71oz per sq. yd. nanoseeum netting from thruhiker.com:

                                    http://www.thru-hiker.com/materialdetail.asp?
                                    product_id=MG151&subcat=Ripstop

                                    With this light wgt (but pricey) nanoseeum, my net only weighs 5,8
                                    oz. I put a zipper in it that I got from Thruhiker also. Mine doesn't
                                    have hanging ropes. It hangs from a permanent ridgeline cord in my
                                    hammock, and I just tie the open ends of the net closed with the
                                    tail end of the ridge cord line. On the very bottom section, I used
                                    1.1 oz syl nylon instead of net. It's more durable, snag resistant,
                                    and I can stow light wgt items in it while using the hammock. I put
                                    a pocket inside on the syl nylon that can also serve as a stuff sack.

                                    Patti
                                  • bjedge540
                                    ... Patti, Thanks....I saw one like that at the camping store today....It looked good but heavy. Thanks for the light nanoseeum link. That will help things.
                                    Message 17 of 19 , Aug 16, 2005
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                                      --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, "quiltpatti" <quiltbinder@s...>
                                      wrote:
                                      > I liked the looks of the net on this site:
                                      >
                                      > http://www.hammockbliss.safeshopper.com//19/cat19.htm?672
                                      >
                                      > So I copied it. I sometimes sleep with body parts hanging over the
                                      > hammock sides and this design gives me more freedom. I used the
                                      > 0.71oz per sq. yd. nanoseeum netting from thruhiker.com:
                                      >
                                      >

                                      Patti,

                                      Thanks....I saw one like that at the camping store today....It looked
                                      good but heavy. Thanks for the light nanoseeum link. That will help
                                      things.

                                      Barry
                                    • rambler4466
                                      ... Yes. Be sure you use no-seeum netting. Alos, I do not think you need quite so much netting. Note the Speer hammock only has netting to the top edges of
                                      Message 18 of 19 , Aug 19, 2005
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                                        --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, "bjedge540" <janzenbarry@l...>
                                        wrote:

                                        > good but heavy. Thanks for the light nanoseeum link. That will help
                                        > things.
                                        >
                                        > Barry

                                        Yes. Be sure you use no-seeum netting. Alos, I do not think you need
                                        quite so much netting. Note the Speer hammock only has netting to the
                                        top edges of the hammock, and other methods drape netting just over
                                        the sides, held in place by elastic or shock-coerd ties underneath.
                                        Mosquitoes biting through the hammock fabric have not been a problem.

                                        http://imrisk.com/zhammock/zhammock.htm
                                      • jwj32542
                                        Try this one: http://www.imrisk.com/zhammock/zhammock.htm
                                        Message 19 of 19 , Aug 19, 2005
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