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Re: Hammock Bivy

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  • Dave Womble
    DebW, It has been about a year since you made your hammock bivy, any more insight that you would like to share? I still occassionally go back and marvel at
    Message 1 of 15 , Feb 29, 2004
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      DebW,

      It has been about a year since you made your hammock bivy, any more
      insight that you would like to share? I still occassionally go back
      and marvel at what you did.

      Youngblood

      --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, "Debra Weisenstein"
      <dweisens@a...> wrote:
      > I added 2 photos of the homemade hammock bivy (in this yahoo group
      > photo gallery). Weight of the bivy is about 20 oz. I slept in it
      > last night and it definitely adds 5-10 degrees of warmth to my
      > sleeping bag. Overnight temperature was 25F. I got frost on the
      > outside of the bivy and frozen condensation on the inside. I'll
      have
      > to remember to use a vapor barrier inside my bag next time.
      >
      > -DebW
      >
      > --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, "Debra Weisenstein"
      > <dweisens@a...> wrote:
      > > Just finished sewing a hammock-compatible bivy sack. Goretex top
      and
      > > coated ripstop bottom with half-length zipper. I made it to use
      either
      > > on the ground or in a hammock. Both ends have 12 inch velcro slits
      > > through which the hammock ties can extent. I had to make the head
      end
      > > longer than necessary for ground use in order to clear the end of
      the
      > > hammock. Seems to add quite a bit of warmth while in the hammock.
      One
      > > could put insulation or extra clothes in the bottom portion under
      the
      > > hammock just like a Garlington Insulator. I've posted a picture on
      > > Sgt. Rock's site
      > > (http://hikinghq.net/forum/showthread.php?s=&threadid=528).
    • Debra Weisenstein
      Thanks, Youngblood. Nothing really new to share. The hammock bivy I made is a bit on the heavy side, with ripstop bottom and goretex top. I may make another
      Message 2 of 15 , Mar 2, 2004
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        Thanks, Youngblood. Nothing really new to share. The hammock bivy I
        made is a bit on the heavy side, with ripstop bottom and goretex top.
        I may make another with silnylon bottom and a lighter more breathable
        top. Maybe a Speer down top blanket for bottom insulation. I have
        gotten a few requests for the pattern, but it's really just using the
        girth of your sleeping bag and the length of the hammock. Lately I've
        been loving backyard hammocking with an old polarguard bag used like a
        peapod and a down bag inside. Think I'll buy a Kelty Light Year 3D 30
        degree bag with foot zip as soon as I get my REI dividend - looks like
        an excellent bag for use around a hammock. If I can use that alone
        with a hammock down to 40-45 degrees in summer, it would be excellent.
        Still trying to come up with the perfect system for hanging and
        shelter sleeping both.

        DebW

        --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, "Dave Womble" <dpwomble@y...>
        wrote:
        > DebW,
        >
        > It has been about a year since you made your hammock bivy, any more
        > insight that you would like to share? I still occassionally go back
        > and marvel at what you did.
        >
        > Youngblood
        >
        > --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, "Debra Weisenstein"
        > <dweisens@a...> wrote:
        > > I added 2 photos of the homemade hammock bivy (in this yahoo group
        > > photo gallery). Weight of the bivy is about 20 oz. I slept in it
        > > last night and it definitely adds 5-10 degrees of warmth to my
        > > sleeping bag. Overnight temperature was 25F. I got frost on the
        > > outside of the bivy and frozen condensation on the inside. I'll
        > have
        > > to remember to use a vapor barrier inside my bag next time.
        > >
        > > -DebW
        > >
      • Rebecca
        Last Saturday night I had the chance to set up my Hennessy Expedition Asym as a bivy. I used the method that Shane describes here: http://tinyurl.com/a5qx I
        Message 3 of 15 , Mar 23, 2004
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          Last Saturday night I had the chance to set up my Hennessy Expedition
          Asym as a bivy. I used the method that Shane describes here:

          http://tinyurl.com/a5qx

          I didn't use the tarp - it was a nice night and I wanted to watch the
          stars.

          I slept with my head at the entrance end, making it easy to slide my
          feet into my sleeping bag and on top of my pad. The hammock stayed
          steady and secure all night despite my tossing and turning.

          Picture of me figuring out how the heck to set it up, with a lot of
          commentary but no help by onlookers:

          http://community.webshots.com/photo/127521418/127536688jdHflJ

          Picture of me inside the hammock:

          http://community.webshots.com/photo/127521418/127539327kEPNRs

          The way I had it set up made it difficult to attach the tarp if I had
          wanted to. If I needed the tarp I would have moved the poles out
          further. As you can see in the second picture there is more than
          enough room - it's roomier than a bivy. It sagged a little during the
          night - there was heavy condensation that everyone had problems with.
        • SF Nazdarovye
          I set up my Ultralight Backpacker A-Sym the same way on this trip, with the added twist of using the single hanging rope to set up a tripod with the hiking
          Message 4 of 15 , Mar 23, 2004
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            I set up my Ultralight Backpacker A-Sym the same way on this trip, with
            the added twist of using the single hanging rope to set up a "tripod"
            with the hiking pole. I did this by putting two stakes about a foot and
            a half to either side of the pole and out from it a bit, then looping
            the hammock rope around the pole, running it down to one stake, across
            the ground to the second stake, then back up to the pole, where I tied
            it off. Seemed to work as well as using additional rope, which I didn't
            have.

            I took some pictures, but the camera lens was fogged and they didn't
            turn out well enough to post. If my explanation wasn't clear, let me
            know and I'll try to clarify. Meanwhile, backpkrmn got a picture of me
            in the hammock/bivy:

            http://community.webshots.com/photo/127521418/127540733ZHBtmp

            And I'm standing next to it here at left in this picture (Rebecca is
            pitching hers at right; the other two bystanders are poking fun at our
            shelter choice ;)

            http://community.webshots.com/photo/127521418/127538006QVDgkf

            It was not the most comfortable shelter, but it worked. I would have
            rather had the Explorer model for this, as it has a bit more room.

            - Steve

            On Mar 23, 2004, at 3:40 PM, Rebecca wrote:

            > Last Saturday night I had the chance to set up my Hennessy Expedition
            > Asym as a bivy. I used the method that Shane describes here:
            >
            > http://tinyurl.com/a5qx
            >
            > I didn't use the tarp - it was a nice night and I wanted to watch the
            > stars.
            >
            > I slept with my head at the entrance end, making it easy to slide my
            > feet into my sleeping bag and on top of my pad. The hammock stayed
            > steady and secure all night despite my tossing and turning.
            >
            > Picture of me figuring out how the heck to set it up, with a lot of
            > commentary but no help by onlookers:
            >
            > http://community.webshots.com/photo/127521418/127536688jdHflJ
            >
            > Picture of me inside the hammock:
            >
            > http://community.webshots.com/photo/127521418/127539327kEPNRs
            >
            > The way I had it set up made it difficult to attach the tarp if I had
            > wanted to. If I needed the tarp I would have moved the poles out
            > further. As you can see in the second picture there is more than
            > enough room - it's roomier than a bivy. It sagged a little during the
            > night - there was heavy condensation that everyone had problems with.
            >
            >
            >
            >
            > Yahoo! Groups Links
            >
            >
            >
            >
            >
          • SF Nazdarovye
            Oh - and I slept the other way, with my head at the usual end and my feet by the opening. That worked well for me and seemed to make getting in and out of the
            Message 5 of 15 , Mar 23, 2004
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              Oh - and I slept the other way, with my head at the usual end and my
              feet by the opening. That worked well for me and seemed to make getting
              in and out of the hammock easier, especially given the lower pitch of
              the Backpacker (shorter) model.

              - Steve


              On Mar 23, 2004, at 3:40 PM, Rebecca wrote:

              > I slept with my head at the entrance end, making it easy to slide my
              > feet into my sleeping bag and on top of my pad. The hammock stayed
              > steady and secure all night despite my tossing and turning.
            • SF Nazdarovye
              And one last note - backpkrmn got a nice overview shot of the camp: http://community.webshots.com/photo/127589022/127599385kYcRJR From left to right you can
              Message 6 of 15 , Mar 23, 2004
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                And one last note - backpkrmn got a nice overview shot of the camp:

                http://community.webshots.com/photo/127589022/127599385kYcRJR

                From left to right you can see our two hammock bivies above a Tarptent
                Squall and Cloudburst, then an old Europa tarptent between two more
                standard small tents. Dave slept in an ID bivy sack, which was between
                the Europa and the right-most tent. Quite a collection of lightweight
                shelters!

                - Steve
              • Tom Jarrell
                Rebecca, A question about ground use of a HH, do you need to protect the fabric bottom from punctures and snags? The material appears delicate. I d rather
                Message 7 of 15 , Mar 23, 2004
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                  Rebecca,
                   
                  A question about ground use of a HH, do you need to protect the fabric bottom from punctures and snags?  The material appears delicate.
                   
                  I'd rather hang, but when nature gives you pasture and an unobstructed view of the stars you don't complain.
                   
                  Tom
                  ----- Original Message -----
                  From: Rebecca
                  Sent: Tuesday, March 23, 2004 3:40 PM
                  Subject: [Hammock Camping] Hammock Bivy

                  Last Saturday night I had the chance to set up my Hennessy Expedition
                  Asym as a bivy.  I used the method that Shane describes here:

                  http://tinyurl.com/a5qx

                  I didn't use the tarp - it was a nice night and I wanted to watch the
                  stars.

                  I slept with my head at the entrance end, making it easy to slide my
                  feet into my sleeping bag and on top of my pad.  The hammock stayed
                  steady and secure all night despite my tossing and turning.

                  Picture of me figuring out how the heck to set it up, with a lot of
                  commentary but no help by onlookers:

                  http://community.webshots.com/photo/127521418/127536688jdHflJ

                  Picture of me inside the hammock:

                  http://community.webshots.com/photo/127521418/127539327kEPNRs

                  The way I had it set up made it difficult to attach the tarp if I had
                  wanted to.  If I needed the tarp I would have moved the poles out
                  further.  As you can see in the second picture there is more than
                  enough room - it's roomier than a bivy.  It sagged a little during the
                  night - there was heavy condensation that everyone had problems with.

                • firefly
                  I don t understand how you can tolerate it as a bivy. I set mine up and was out of there in about 30 seconds. Very cramped when on the ground. Awful! This is
                  Message 8 of 15 , Mar 23, 2004
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                    I don't understand how you can tolerate it as a bivy. I set mine up and was
                    out of there in about 30 seconds. Very cramped when on the ground. Awful!
                    This is not a set up for claustrophobes.
                    Marsanne

                    I set up my Ultralight Backpacker A-Sym the same way on this trip, with
                    the added twist of using the single hanging rope to set up a "tripod"
                    with the hiking pole. I did this by putting two stakes about a foot and
                    a half to either side of the pole and out from it a bit, then looping
                    the hammock rope around the pole, running it down to one stake, across
                    the ground to the second stake, then back up to the pole, where I tied
                    it off. Seemed to work as well as using additional rope, which I didn't
                    have.
                  • Rebecca
                    To be honest, I didn t really think about it. I suppose I could have used the tarp as a groundsheet if needed, but the ground was pretty smooth and it didn t
                    Message 9 of 15 , Mar 23, 2004
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                      To be honest, I didn't really think about it. I suppose I could have
                      used the tarp as a groundsheet if needed, but the ground was pretty
                      smooth and it didn't concern me. Good point though.


                      --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, "Tom Jarrell" <tjarrell@c...>
                      wrote:
                      > Rebecca,
                      >
                      > A question about ground use of a HH, do you need to protect the
                      fabric bottom from punctures and snags? The material appears delicate.
                      >
                      > I'd rather hang, but when nature gives you pasture and an
                      unobstructed view of the stars you don't complain.
                      >
                      > Tom
                      > ----- Original Message -----
                      > From: Rebecca
                      > To: hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com
                      > Sent: Tuesday, March 23, 2004 3:40 PM
                      > Subject: [Hammock Camping] Hammock Bivy
                      >
                      >
                      > Last Saturday night I had the chance to set up my Hennessy Expedition
                      > Asym as a bivy. I used the method that Shane describes here:
                      >
                      > http://tinyurl.com/a5qx
                      >
                      > I didn't use the tarp - it was a nice night and I wanted to watch the
                      > stars.
                      >
                      > I slept with my head at the entrance end, making it easy to slide my
                      > feet into my sleeping bag and on top of my pad. The hammock stayed
                      > steady and secure all night despite my tossing and turning.
                      >
                      > Picture of me figuring out how the heck to set it up, with a lot of
                      > commentary but no help by onlookers:
                      >
                      > http://community.webshots.com/photo/127521418/127536688jdHflJ
                      >
                      > Picture of me inside the hammock:
                      >
                      > http://community.webshots.com/photo/127521418/127539327kEPNRs
                      >
                      > The way I had it set up made it difficult to attach the tarp if I had
                      > wanted to. If I needed the tarp I would have moved the poles out
                      > further. As you can see in the second picture there is more than
                      > enough room - it's roomier than a bivy. It sagged a little during the
                      > night - there was heavy condensation that everyone had problems with.
                      >
                      >
                      >
                      >
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                      >
                      > c.. Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to the Yahoo! Terms of
                      Service.
                    • nazdarovye
                      It was definitely not roomy...my shoulders were touching the netting every time I rolled over. As for a groundsheet, I did think about that, and chose a spot
                      Message 10 of 15 , Mar 23, 2004
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                        It was definitely not roomy...my shoulders were touching the netting
                        every time I rolled over.

                        As for a groundsheet, I did think about that, and chose a spot that
                        was covered with soft grass, rather than the rocks and rougher plants
                        that covered much of the site. The bottom of the hammock picked up no
                        dirt, stayed completely dry, and turned out to be the only part of the
                        hammock that I can't complain about in bivy mode!

                        Like Rebecca's, my hammock sagged a bit in the night, and there wasn't
                        much "headroom" to begin with. Plus, the condensation on the netting
                        was significant, soaking the outer layer of my sleeping bag where they
                        touched. (Of course, the other single-wall shelters all had lots of
                        condensation at this site as well - the hammocks weren't singled out.)

                        All in all, it was good to prove that it's possible to use the hammock
                        this way in a pinch. Hopefully there won't be too many future pinches.


                        --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, "firefly" <firefly@e...> wrote:
                        > I don't understand how you can tolerate it as a bivy. I set mine up
                        and was
                        > out of there in about 30 seconds. Very cramped when on the ground.
                        Awful!
                        > This is not a set up for claustrophobes.
                        > Marsanne
                      • Shane Steinkamp
                        ... You might have had less condensation if you had pitched the tarp, though. Something about the dew point is sniggling in the back of my mind... Shane
                        Message 11 of 15 , Mar 24, 2004
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                          > Like Rebecca's, my hammock sagged a bit in the night, and there
                          > wasn't much "headroom" to begin with. Plus, the condensation on the
                          > netting was significant, soaking the outer layer of my sleeping bag
                          > where they touched. (Of course, the other single-wall shelters all
                          > had lots of condensation at this site as well - the hammocks
                          > weren't singled out.)

                          You might have had less condensation if you had pitched the tarp, though.
                          Something about the dew point is sniggling in the back of my mind...

                          Shane
                        • SF Nazdarovye
                          I debated this myself - I kind of wish I d tried it (just from an experimental/learning basis), but I sure enjoyed looking up at the stars from my hammobivy.
                          Message 12 of 15 , Mar 24, 2004
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                            I debated this myself - I kind of wish I'd tried it (just from an
                            experimental/learning basis), but I sure enjoyed looking up at the
                            stars from my "hammobivy."


                            On Mar 24, 2004, at 3:19 PM, Shane Steinkamp wrote:

                            > You might have had less condensation if you had pitched the tarp,
                            > though.
                            > Something about the dew point is sniggling in the back of my mind...
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