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Ridge*pole* hammock

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  • Dent Alastair
    Just musing on hammock designs - one of the probs with hammocks is the tremendous lateral forces on whatever you tie to. Soooo - has anyone tried making a
    Message 1 of 4 , Feb 25, 2004
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      Just musing on hammock designs - one of the probs with hammocks is the
      tremendous lateral forces on whatever you tie to.

      Soooo - has anyone tried making a hammock with a ridgepole, that would
      then be under compressive forces? Impractical for backpacking - but I
      was thinking of confined spaces - such as in houses. Might be good
      where house walls are flimsy.
    • Mirage
      ... the ... would ... but I ... Very wierd... I was lying in bed this morning doing my usuall daydreaming while I wake up and thinking about this very thing.
      Message 2 of 4 , Feb 25, 2004
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        --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, "Dent Alastair"
        <alastair.dent@v...> wrote:
        > Just musing on hammock designs - one of the probs with hammocks is
        the
        > tremendous lateral forces on whatever you tie to.
        >
        > Soooo - has anyone tried making a hammock with a ridgepole, that
        would
        > then be under compressive forces? Impractical for backpacking -
        but I
        > was thinking of confined spaces - such as in houses. Might be good
        > where house walls are flimsy.

        Very wierd... I was lying in bed this morning doing my
        usuall "daydreaming while I wake up" and thinking about this very
        thing.

        In particular, I was invisioning a rigid, curved ridge pole
        connected between two "A" frame verticle supports (like treking
        poles attached at the handles). Throwing a tarp with reverse
        Cantenary curve over top of the ridgepole, making a potentially very
        strong foul weather, heavy snow load dome support, with a hammock
        hung underneath.

        I've played with similar frames back in my scuba diving days that I
        used to suppoer a tarp and hang my wetsuit and BC to dry overnight
        (car camping). In those experiments, I was using cheap galvanized
        threaded pipe, 3/4" OD, from Home Depot, and various elbows
        and "T"'s to create the "A" frame. The whole kit would break down
        and fit into a 3" PVC tube, about 8' long and capped off with a
        threaded plug. It worked great for car camping because weight was
        NOT a factor... ;)

        I would imagine that a system could be developed out of Aluminum
        poles that would be substantially lighter, but would it be
        justifiable in the back country??? Users preference would dictate.
        If you are pulling a pulk, or find a way to integrate the poles into
        a packframe structure so they performed dual duty, it might be worth
        a try.

        You might even be able to use your trecking poles as a ridge pole
        (wouldn't be curved). My Leki's, extended to 130cm, attached
        together (I've seen a kit out there, but can't find a link right
        now) would measure somewhere over 8.5'. Not a long pole, but might
        work? I imagine the Life-Link poles might be longer?

        Any whooo...

        Wierd to be having the same thoughs this morning...

        Shane "Mirage"...

        BTW, I AM still building my down underquilt, but sewing those darn
        baffles is just plain TEDIOUS, when I find the time!!! I've got
        about half of them done. Then I gotta start stuffing...
      • Ralph Oborn
        This is very, verry, weird, for the last couple of weeks I ve had a design in my head for hanging hammocks indoors involving 2 A frames and a connector
        Message 3 of 4 , Feb 25, 2004
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          This is very, verry, weird, for the last couple of weeks I've had a
          design in my head for hanging hammocks indoors involving 2 "A"
          frames and a connector across the top to take the lateral stress,
          I've just been waiting for the weather to break so I could build and
          photo.

          I didn't have the arch on the ridge pole, thats a good improvement.


          I figured, 4 foot deep, 7 foot high and 8 or 10 foot long, no holes
          in the wall.



          --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, "Mirage" <mirage@p...> wrote:
          > --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, "Dent Alastair"
          > <alastair.dent@v...> wrote:
          > > Just musing on hammock designs - one of the probs with hammocks
          is
          > the
          > > tremendous lateral forces on whatever you tie to.
          > >
          > > Soooo - has anyone tried making a hammock with a ridgepole, that
          > would
          > > then be under compressive forces? Impractical for backpacking -
          > but I
          > > was thinking of confined spaces - such as in houses. Might be
          good
          > > where house walls are flimsy.
          >
          > Very wierd... I was lying in bed this morning doing my
          > usuall "daydreaming while I wake up" and thinking about this very
          > thing.
          >
          > In particular, I was invisioning a rigid, curved ridge pole
          > connected between two "A" frame verticle supports (like treking
          > poles attached at the handles). Throwing a tarp with reverse
          > Cantenary curve over top of the ridgepole, making a potentially
          very
          > strong foul weather, heavy snow load dome support, with a hammock
          > hung underneath.
          >
          > I've played with similar frames back in my scuba diving days that
          I
          > used to suppoer a tarp and hang my wetsuit and BC to dry overnight
          > (car camping). In those experiments, I was using cheap galvanized
          > threaded pipe, 3/4" OD, from Home Depot, and various elbows
          > and "T"'s to create the "A" frame. The whole kit would break down
          > and fit into a 3" PVC tube, about 8' long and capped off with a
          > threaded plug. It worked great for car camping because weight was
          > NOT a factor... ;)
          >
          > I would imagine that a system could be developed out of Aluminum
          > poles that would be substantially lighter, but would it be
          > justifiable in the back country??? Users preference would
          dictate.
          > If you are pulling a pulk, or find a way to integrate the poles
          into
          > a packframe structure so they performed dual duty, it might be
          worth
          > a try.
          >
          > You might even be able to use your trecking poles as a ridge pole
          > (wouldn't be curved). My Leki's, extended to 130cm, attached
          > together (I've seen a kit out there, but can't find a link right
          > now) would measure somewhere over 8.5'. Not a long pole, but
          might
          > work? I imagine the Life-Link poles might be longer?
          >
          > Any whooo...
          >
          > Wierd to be having the same thoughs this morning...
          >
          > Shane "Mirage"...
          >
          > BTW, I AM still building my down underquilt, but sewing those darn
          > baffles is just plain TEDIOUS, when I find the time!!! I've got
          > about half of them done. Then I gotta start stuffing...
        • Chamness, David
          Dent Alastair (really?) asked if anyone has tried this. I have! It works great. I use a 14 section of bamboo, and attach the ends of the ropes to the pole,
          Message 4 of 4 , Feb 26, 2004
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            Dent Alastair (really?) asked if anyone has tried this.  I have!  It works great. I use a 14' section of bamboo, and attach the ends of the ropes to the pole, then suspend the pole itself on bamboo A frames.  The only lateral forces I need to counter then are the ones needed to keep the thing from falling over, which are very slight.
             
            I did this because of the problem of having no trees to tie to, and having tent stakes pull out of soft ground.  This works anywhere, and is easy to set up.  The drawback is carrying the 5 bamboo poles. I use it when "car camping" and tie the poles to the top of my truck.
             
            David Chamness
             

            Date: Wed, 25 Feb 2004 10:52:54 -0000

            From: "Dent Alastair" <alastair.dent@...>

            Subject: Ridge*pole* hammock

            Just musing on hammock designs - one of the probs with hammocks is the

            tremendous lateral forces on whatever you tie to.

            Soooo - has anyone tried making a hammock with a ridgepole, that would

            then be under compressive forces? Impractical for backpacking - but I

            was thinking of confined spaces - such as in houses. Might be good

            where house walls are flimsy.

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