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Hammocking in Panama (long)

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  • mindrehab248
    I recently returned from a trip to one of Panama s islands. The main focus of the trip was tree climbing in the rainforest, and while there we had an
    Message 1 of 14 , Feb 23, 2004
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      I recently returned from a trip to one of Panama's islands. The main
      focus of the trip was tree climbing in the rainforest, and while
      there we had an opportunity to spend a night in the trees. Thanks to
      the help of this group, including Rick, and especially the
      invaluable assistance of Ed Speer, I was able to choose the type of
      hammock I took (a Speer hammock made from the kit) and got great
      ideas about how to set it up in the tree.
      Two other climbers joined me for a night spent 85' up in a
      broadleafed tree. There is a platform made from 2' x 4's that is
      lashed to the two trunks of the tree. One climber spent the night in
      a Crazy Crib, the other in a Dryad. Both were on the platform. I
      hung my Speer hammock just off the platform so that I had to pull it
      up underneath me while standing on the platform, then lean back and
      swing out into the open space underneath me. I should point out that
      we all were wearing tree climbing harnesses and were attached to
      climbing ropes during the entire time we were up in the tree and in
      our shelters. I was able to sandwich my climbing rope between the
      bugnet and the hammock, so I didn't suffer any bug bites (I had also
      treated the entire hammock with permethrin spray). Watching the
      sunset and the sunrise, and being surrounded by the sounds of the
      jungle throughout the night created an experience I'll never forget.
      A troop of howler monkeys making an incredible amount of noise got
      us going in the morning. I would like to say that they woke us up,
      but you have to be sleeping in order to be woken up! I don't think
      any of us slept for more than 15 or 20 minutes at a time. A lot of
      that, for me, was getting used to being in a hammock for an entire
      night (my hammock had been finsihed about 6 hours before I left for
      Panama). I know that I'll get used to it quickly. If you're
      interested, I put a couple of pictures in my folder in the Photo
      section. I wasn't able to sleep near the beach; apparently every
      year, more people get killed by coconuts falling on their heads than
      by getting struck by lightning.
      Thanks again for the great insights from this group! Patrick
    • Ed Speer
      Wow, thanks for the update Patrick! I ve spent a bit of time in the South American jungles and remember dreaming of sleeping in the tree tops--so I can relate
      Message 2 of 14 , Feb 24, 2004
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        Wow, thanks for the update Patrick! I've spent a bit of time in the South
        American jungles and remember dreaming of sleeping in the tree tops--so I
        can relate to your experience. Being stuck on or near the ground in the
        jungle is to miss much of the action, especially at night! Maybe we should
        get you to lead a Hammock Hangers campout! ...Ed Moderator, Hammock
        Camping-L

        > -----Original Message-----
        > From: mindrehab248 [mailto:mindrehab248@...]
        > Sent: Tuesday, February 24, 2004 1:06 AM
        > To: hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com
        > Subject: [Hammock Camping] Hammocking in Panama (long)
        >
        >
        > I recently returned from a trip to one of Panama's islands. The main
        > focus of the trip was tree climbing in the rainforest, and while
        > there we had an opportunity to spend a night in the trees. Thanks to
        > the help of this group, including Rick, and especially the
        > invaluable assistance of Ed Speer, I was able to choose the type of
        > hammock I took (a Speer hammock made from the kit) and got great
        > ideas about how to set it up in the tree.
        > Two other climbers joined me for a night spent 85' up in a
        > broadleafed tree. There is a platform made from 2' x 4's that is
        > lashed to the two trunks of the tree. One climber spent the night in
        > a Crazy Crib, the other in a Dryad. Both were on the platform. I
        > hung my Speer hammock just off the platform so that I had to pull it
        > up underneath me while standing on the platform, then lean back and
        > swing out into the open space underneath me. I should point out that
        > we all were wearing tree climbing harnesses and were attached to
        > climbing ropes during the entire time we were up in the tree and in
        > our shelters. I was able to sandwich my climbing rope between the
        > bugnet and the hammock, so I didn't suffer any bug bites (I had also
        > treated the entire hammock with permethrin spray). Watching the
        > sunset and the sunrise, and being surrounded by the sounds of the
        > jungle throughout the night created an experience I'll never forget.
        > A troop of howler monkeys making an incredible amount of noise got
        > us going in the morning. I would like to say that they woke us up,
        > but you have to be sleeping in order to be woken up! I don't think
        > any of us slept for more than 15 or 20 minutes at a time. A lot of
        > that, for me, was getting used to being in a hammock for an entire
        > night (my hammock had been finsihed about 6 hours before I left for
        > Panama). I know that I'll get used to it quickly. If you're
        > interested, I put a couple of pictures in my folder in the Photo
        > section. I wasn't able to sleep near the beach; apparently every
        > year, more people get killed by coconuts falling on their heads than
        > by getting struck by lightning.
        > Thanks again for the great insights from this group! Patrick
        >
        >
        >
        >
        > Yahoo! Groups Links
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
      • Rick
        Great report Patrick. I look forward to the pictures. And congrats on getting the hammock finished in time for the trip. I do believe I would also have
        Message 3 of 14 , Feb 25, 2004
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          Great report Patrick. I look forward to the pictures. And congrats on
          getting the hammock finished in time for the trip. I do believe I would
          also have found it difficult to sleep my first night in a hammock that
          many feet from the ground.

          Rick

          mindrehab248 wrote:

          >I recently returned from a trip to one of Panama's islands. The main
          >focus of the trip was tree climbing in the rainforest, and while
          >there we had an opportunity to spend a night in the trees.
          >
        • firefly
          This is truly amazing. Did you not sleep because you were terrified, or excited, or the monkey noise, or what? Also, did you have to pee in the middle of the
          Message 4 of 14 , Feb 25, 2004
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            This is truly amazing. Did you not sleep because you were terrified, or
            excited, or the monkey noise, or what? Also, did you have to pee in the
            middle of the night and if so, what did you do? Did you have to swing back
            to the platform? I always have to get up in the middle of the night and this
            would fully wake me up, having to take care of this chore 80 FEET UP!!
            Marsanne

            One climber spent the night in
            a Crazy Crib, the other in a Dryad. Both were on the platform. I
            hung my Speer hammock just off the platform so that I had to pull it
            up underneath me while standing on the platform, then lean back and
            swing out into the open space underneath me. I should point out that
            we all were wearing tree climbing harnesses and were attached to
            climbing ropes during the entire time we were up in the tree and in
            our shelters. I was able to sandwich my climbing rope between the
            bugnet and the hammock, so I didn't suffer any bug bites (I had also
            treated the entire hammock with permethrin spray). Watching the
            sunset and the sunrise, and being surrounded by the sounds of the
            jungle throughout the night created an experience I'll never forget.
            A troop of howler monkeys making an incredible amount of noise got
            us going in the morning. I would like to say that they woke us up,
            but you have to be sleeping in order to be woken up! I don't think
            any of us slept for more than 15 or 20 minutes at a time.
          • Ralph Oborn
            I think he holds the list record for highest hammock Ralph ... congrats on ... would ... that ... main
            Message 5 of 14 , Feb 25, 2004
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              I think he holds the list record for "highest" hammock
              Ralph

              --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, Rick <ra1@i...> wrote:
              > Great report Patrick. I look forward to the pictures. And
              congrats on
              > getting the hammock finished in time for the trip. I do believe I
              would
              > also have found it difficult to sleep my first night in a hammock
              that
              > many feet from the ground.
              >
              > Rick
              >
              > mindrehab248 wrote:
              >
              > >I recently returned from a trip to one of Panama's islands. The
              main
              > >focus of the trip was tree climbing in the rainforest, and while
              > >there we had an opportunity to spend a night in the trees.
              > >
            • mindrehab248
              ... Mostly I think I didn t sleep well just because it was my first time trying to sleep in a hammock. I wasn t uncomfortable, but at the same time I had
              Message 6 of 14 , Feb 26, 2004
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                --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, "firefly" <firefly@e...> wrote:
                >Did you not sleep because you were terrified, or
                > excited, or the monkey noise, or what?

                Mostly I think I didn't sleep well just because it was my first time
                trying to sleep in a hammock. I wasn't uncomfortable, but at the same
                time I had difficulty getting comfortable. Does that make sense?
                Also, my climbing rope would move when I changed postitions, and
                since it was sandwiched in the velcro between the hammock and the
                bugnet, the velcro would rip open a little. I had to try to roll over
                gingerly to try to not wake up the other two people. Plus it was damp
                and hot, so I was sticking to the sides of the hammock. The animal
                noises didn't really bother me.

                Also, did you have to pee in the
                > middle of the night and if so, what did you do?

                Didn't have to pee. Sweating a lot.
              • Risk
                ... Well, perhaps not... I just came back from Germany on Tuesday evening. I slept about 5 hours in my hammock in the back of the cargo aircraft. I was
                Message 7 of 14 , Feb 26, 2004
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                  --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, "Ralph Oborn" <polecatpop@y...>
                  wrote:
                  > I think he holds the list record for "highest" hammock
                  > Ralph
                  >
                  Well, perhaps not...

                  I just came back from Germany on Tuesday evening. I slept about 5
                  hours in my hammock in the back of the cargo aircraft. I was roughly
                  35,000 feet above the ground, or water. Surprisingly, I did not need
                  a climbing harness. I also went to sleep in one country and woke up
                  in another. When I got up for my bio break, I was in no country at all.

                  ;)

                  Rick
                • tjarrell@cox.net
                  Rick, Just goes to show you that you need to be careful where you hang your hammock. No telling where you might end up. :) Tom, USN (ret) From: Risk
                  Message 8 of 14 , Feb 26, 2004
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                    --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, "Ralph Oborn" <polecatpop@y...>
                    wrote:
                    > I think he holds the list record for "highest" hammock
                    > Ralph
                    >
                    Well,  perhaps not...

                    I just came back from Germany on Tuesday evening.  I slept about 5
                    hours in my hammock in the back of the cargo aircraft.  I was roughly
                    35,000 feet above the ground, or water.  Surprisingly, I did not need
                    a climbing harness.  I also went to sleep in one country and woke up
                    in another.  When I got up for my bio break, I was in no country at all.

                    ;)

                    Rick

                  • firefly
                    If you’re talking about a military C130, those are GREAT to sleep in. When Hurricane Mitch hit Hounduras we had a huge public relief effort, sponsored by the
                    Message 9 of 14 , Feb 26, 2004
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                      If you’re talking about a military C130, those are GREAT to sleep in. When Hurricane Mitch hit Hounduras we had a huge public relief effort, sponsored by the governor’s office. We did a pr campaign and ran about a dozen loads of food and medical supplies down there. I made two trips escorting news media. Very noisy inside, too noisy to talk. They gave us ear plugs, folded down the cots, and gave us blankets, and pillows for the flight from New Orleans to Honduras and back. Best naps I ever had. Cute Air National Guard soldiers taking care of us, etc.  I can see how a hammock would have been good.

                      Marsanne

                       

                      >
                      Well,  perhaps not...

                      I just came back from Germany on Tuesday evening.  I slept about 5
                      hours in my hammock in the back of the cargo aircraft.  I was roughly
                      35,000 feet above the ground, or water.  Surprisingly, I did not need
                      a climbing harness.  I also went to sleep in one country and woke up
                      in another.  When I got up for my bio break, I was in no country at all.

                      ;)

                      Rick

                    • Rick
                      ... Yeah, difference being that we in the AF end up someplace different in a couple hours, instead of a couple weeks. Risk
                      Message 10 of 14 , Feb 26, 2004
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                        tjarrell@... wrote:

                        >Rick,
                        >Just goes to show you that you need to be careful where you hang your hammock. No telling where you might end up. :)
                        >
                        >Tom, USN (ret)
                        >
                        >
                        >
                        >
                        Yeah, difference being that we in the AF end up someplace different in a
                        couple hours, instead of a couple weeks.

                        Risk
                      • Risk
                        ... Ah yes, The 130 is a great plane. I was in the 141 which (fortunately) crosses oceans faster. Rick
                        Message 11 of 14 , Feb 26, 2004
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                          --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, "firefly" <firefly@e...> wrote:
                          > If you're talking about a military C130, those are GREAT to sleep in.

                          Ah yes, The 130 is a great plane. I was in the 141 which
                          (fortunately) crosses oceans faster.

                          Rick
                        • Ralph Oborn
                          Ok, are we going to have to come up with mobile and non mobile catagories? Coldest, low altitude, in a HH, with only one tree, two titaniaum stakes, one dog,
                          Message 12 of 14 , Feb 26, 2004
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                            Ok, are we going to have to come up with mobile and non mobile
                            catagories?

                            Coldest, low altitude, in a HH, with only one tree, two titaniaum
                            stakes, one dog, stationary, ..... :]


                            And the catagories are: Suggestions appreciated

                            Most consecutive nights
                            Highest altitude
                            Highest above ground
                            Coldest
                            Hottest
                            Most unusual
                            Lightest weight
                            Most precip during the night


                            Etc.



                            --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, "Risk" <ra1@i...> wrote:
                            > --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, "Ralph Oborn"
                            <polecatpop@y...>
                            > wrote:
                            > > I think he holds the list record for "highest" hammock
                            > > Ralph
                            > >
                            > Well, perhaps not...
                            >
                            > I just came back from Germany on Tuesday evening. I slept about 5
                            > hours in my hammock in the back of the cargo aircraft. I was
                            roughly
                            > 35,000 feet above the ground, or water. Surprisingly, I did not
                            need
                            > a climbing harness. I also went to sleep in one country and woke
                            up
                            > in another. When I got up for my bio break, I was in no country
                            at all.
                            >
                            > ;)
                            >
                            > Rick
                          • Paul
                            Welcome home Rick. -Paul, USAF (ret) KC-135 Nav. I never got to sleep in one of those. __________________________________ Do you Yahoo!? Get better spam
                            Message 13 of 14 , Feb 26, 2004
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                              Welcome home Rick.

                              -Paul, USAF (ret) KC-135 Nav. I never got to sleep in
                              one of those.

                              __________________________________
                              Do you Yahoo!?
                              Get better spam protection with Yahoo! Mail.
                              http://antispam.yahoo.com/tools
                            • robi
                              Hey that sleepingon the move reminds me of the second best place to sleep, hammock being the obvious first! A train! i took the train to china from budapest
                              Message 14 of 14 , Feb 26, 2004
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                                Hey that sleepingon the move reminds me of the second best place to sleep,
                                hammock being the obvious first!

                                A train!

                                i took the train to china from budapest and back twice... four trips of a
                                week each, fold down the birth, get in and the train rocks you to sleep..
                                you get so used to it that in fact you cannot sleep the first night or two
                                in your destination uless you rock the red a bit, some even made funny
                                train noises at the hostel in beijing just to help themselves fall
                                asleep...

                                and as for cute, Omsk, has some migthy fine looking women! i much prefer
                                them to national guard men, being a man myslef.

                                robi

                                On Thu, 26 Feb 2004 16:06:06 -0600, firefly <firefly@...> wrote:

                                > If you’re talking about a military C130, those are GREAT to sleep in.
                                > When
                                > Hurricane Mitch hit Hounduras we had a huge public relief effort,
                                > sponsored
                                > by the governor’s office. We did a pr campaign and ran about a dozen
                                > loads
                                > of food and medical supplies down there. I made two trips escorting news
                                > media. Very noisy inside, too noisy to talk. They gave us ear plugs,
                                > folded
                                > down the cots, and gave us blankets, and pillows for the flight from New
                                > Orleans to Honduras and back. Best naps I ever had. Cute Air National
                                > Guard
                                > soldiers taking care of us, etc. I can see how a hammock would have been
                                > good.
                                > Marsanne
                                >
                                >>
                                > Well, perhaps not...
                                >
                                > I just came back from Germany on Tuesday evening. I slept about 5
                                > hours in my hammock in the back of the cargo aircraft. I was roughly
                                > 35,000 feet above the ground, or water. Surprisingly, I did not need
                                > a climbing harness. I also went to sleep in one country and woke up
                                > in another. When I got up for my bio break, I was in no country at all.
                                >
                                > ;)
                                >
                                > Rick



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