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Subject: RE: Need advice on a sleeping bag

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  • Dent Alastair
    Hmm, never camped in Scotland, have you? Buffalo pile clothing was invented because the weather is such that just the atmosphere can saturate down. There
    Message 1 of 4 , Feb 19, 2004
      Hmm, never camped in Scotland, have you?

      'Buffalo' pile clothing was invented because the weather is such that
      just the atmosphere can saturate down. There must be areas of the USA
      that are similar.

      Down is small - but if I was canoeing, I'd take a buffalo bag. Yes,
      they are bulky and heavy - but they work in any conditions, and don't
      need looking after.

      Failing that, primaloft

      "Get a down bag. Just stick it in a dry bag. They work, especially if
      you first enclose it in a tough garbage bag. If you want the pros and
      cons of various fills, look them up on the REI website. But I have had
      every kind of fill out there and down is IT. It compresses easily, and
      is lighter. It doesn't insulate when wet, but what idiot gets a bag wet?
      If you're backpacking, get a pack cover. In a Yak, do the dry bag. I
      have never had one leak, even when I turned over, or was in a canoe with
      splashing. Marsanne"
    • firefly
      Unfortunately, no I have not had the pleasure. I have been close, though. I was in the Lake District 2 years ago, stayed at a hostel at Borrowdale and made it
      Message 2 of 4 , Feb 19, 2004
        Unfortunately, no I have not had the pleasure. I have been close, though. I
        was in the Lake District 2 years ago, stayed at a hostel at Borrowdale and
        made it nearly to the top of Scafell Pike before horizontal sleet-in
        June-drove me down. It was very, very wet, and, uh, point taken! I took a
        picture of a village (forgot name) which my hiking companion said was the
        wettest place on Earth. I live in southern Louisiana, one of the most humid
        places in the US, but it is only humid in the summer, at which time it is
        also too hot to be able to sleep outside at night...or inside, without air
        conditioning. What is 'buffalo pile' clothing? One more observation...it
        seems like it is not easy to camp out in England. I don't remember all the
        details, but from what I remember, there are not a lot of places, even in
        wilderness areas, where one can just sling on a back pack with overnight
        gear, take off down a trail, and camp at the end of the day, when you get
        tired. It seems people usually walk from hostel to hostel, or B&B. I also
        remember that it didn't get dark up there until about 10 or 11 at night (in
        June) and dawn arrived around 3 or 4 am!
        Marsanne


        -----Original Message-----
        From: Dent Alastair [mailto:alastair.dent@...]
        Sent: Thursday, February 19, 2004 5:02 AM
        To: hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com
        Subject: [Hammock Camping] Subject: RE: Need advice on a sleeping bag

        Hmm, never camped in Scotland, have you?

        'Buffalo' pile clothing was invented because the weather is such that
        just the atmosphere can saturate down. There must be areas of the USA
        that are similar.

        Down is small - but if I was canoeing, I'd take a buffalo bag. Yes,
        they are bulky and heavy - but they work in any conditions, and don't
        need looking after.

        Failing that, primaloft

        "Get a down bag. Just stick it in a dry bag. They work, especially if
        you first enclose it in a tough garbage bag. If you want the pros and
        cons of various fills, look them up on the REI website. But I have had
        every kind of fill out there and down is IT. It compresses easily, and
        is lighter. It doesn't insulate when wet, but what idiot gets a bag wet?
        If you're backpacking, get a pack cover. In a Yak, do the dry bag. I
        have never had one leak, even when I turned over, or was in a canoe with
        splashing. Marsanne"




        Yahoo! Groups Links
      • alidisaster
        The wettest village would have been WasteWater. York is possibly wetter - last winter, temp didn t get above 40F, humidity over 98% for a fortnight -
        Message 3 of 4 , Feb 20, 2004
          The 'wettest village' would have been WasteWater.
          York is possibly wetter - last winter, temp didn't get above 40F,
          humidity over 98% for a fortnight - everything soaked.

          Buffalo pile is a combination of a pertex outer with a pile lining -
          the pile is a like a directional fleece. It isn't waterproof, but
          remains warming even if soaked. Buffalo make clothing and bags - I
          have a supersummerweight bag, which I use in summer and winter -
          combining it with clothes in winter - down to about 20F.

          The expedition weight bags are much favoured for extreme latitude sea-
          based expeditions, because you could be utterly soaking wet, be put
          in a buffalo bag, and immediately start warmingup and drying out.
          The penalty is that they are heavy, and *very* bulky.

          BTW, June is 'dry' season in the lake district.

          Few people wild camp in the UK. In national parks, you are allowed
          to overnight camp above 1000ft altitude, almost anywhere. Few people
          do, as it is usually only a mile or 2 extra to a nice cosy pub.

          --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, "firefly" <firefly@e...> wrote:
          > Unfortunately, no I have not had the pleasure. I have been close,
          though. I
          > was in the Lake District 2 years ago, stayed at a hostel at
          Borrowdale and
          > made it nearly to the top of Scafell Pike before horizontal sleet-in
          > June-drove me down. It was very, very wet, and, uh, point taken! I
          took a
          > picture of a village (forgot name) which my hiking companion said
          was the
          > wettest place on Earth. I live in southern Louisiana, one of the
          most humid
          > places in the US, but it is only humid in the summer, at which time
          it is
          > also too hot to be able to sleep outside at night...or inside,
          without air
          > conditioning. What is 'buffalo pile' clothing? One more
          observation...it
          > seems like it is not easy to camp out in England. I don't remember
          all the
          > details, but from what I remember, there are not a lot of places,
          even in
          > wilderness areas, where one can just sling on a back pack with
          overnight
          > gear, take off down a trail, and camp at the end of the day, when
          you get
          > tired. It seems people usually walk from hostel to hostel, or
          B&B. I also
          > remember that it didn't get dark up there until about 10 or 11 at
          night (in
          > June) and dawn arrived around 3 or 4 am!
          > Marsanne
          >
          >
        • Tee
          http://www.buffalosystems.co.uk/
          Message 4 of 4 , Feb 20, 2004
            http://www.buffalosystems.co.uk/

            At 11:00 AM 2/20/04 +0000, you wrote:
            >The 'wettest village' would have been WasteWater.
            >York is possibly wetter - last winter, temp didn't get above 40F,
            >humidity over 98% for a fortnight - everything soaked.
            >
            >Buffalo pile is a combination of a pertex outer with a pile lining -
            >the pile is a like a directional fleece. It isn't waterproof, but
            >remains warming even if soaked. Buffalo make clothing and bags - I
            >have a supersummerweight bag, which I use in summer and winter -
            >combining it with clothes in winter - down to about 20F.
            >
            >The expedition weight bags are much favoured for extreme latitude sea-
            >based expeditions, because you could be utterly soaking wet, be put
            >in a buffalo bag, and immediately start warmingup and drying out.
            >The penalty is that they are heavy, and *very* bulky.
            >
            >BTW, June is 'dry' season in the lake district.
            >
            >Few people wild camp in the UK. In national parks, you are allowed
            >to overnight camp above 1000ft altitude, almost anywhere. Few people
            >do, as it is usually only a mile or 2 extra to a nice cosy pub.
            >
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