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Re: [Hammock Camping] Re: Pad Insulation

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  • tjarrell@cox.net
    Hello All, I m a recent purchaser of a HH Expedition ASYM and signed up for your yahoo group last week. I ve strung up the HH in my garage, attached the snake
    Message 1 of 5 , Feb 9 10:36 AM
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      Marsanne (not Ed) Sorry, it is a privlege to talk with you also.

      A sheaf would work nice, but the material would also work as well
      under or over any other pad at least for a dry run. The comfort and
      insulative effects are additive so no mater which order they were
      used doesn't matter except for convenience. I'm kinda big and I need
      the thickest pad I can find. I'm also a real light sleeper when I'm
      out with my scouts (sometimes just the silence wakes me up). I
      always thought it was me, maybe it's the pad. (I just bought a
      hammock, haven't had a chance to use it yet.)  Before you sell the
      thermarests, you might want to sty stacking them. (try them at home)

      Ralph


      --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, "canoetrip_2000"
      <firefly@e...> wrote:
      >
      > YOu make a good point about over inflating the Thermarests, but
      they
      > are just NOT an option for me. I am a side sleeper, and they are
      not
      > thick enough. I appreciate your suggestion, but I have tried
      > EVERYTHING to make Thermarests work for me, including scooping out
      a
      > hip trench. Just misery, period. I own 2 different Thermarests and
      > they are both for sale, CHEAP!  So, you think the sheath would
      work
      > on the Insulmat, I am gathering?
      > Marsanne (not Ed)
      >
      >
      > > Ed, is a privlege an honor to make a suggestion to you.
      > >
      > > One reason many people do not sleep well on a thermarest is they
      > > over inflate it, then spend most the night trying not to roll
      off.
      > > After you lay on the thermarest and get situated, you should let
      > out
      > > as much air as possoble so the heavest part of your body (hips)
      > > almost touches the ground. With a 3 inch mattress this would
      > almost
      > > be like sleeping in a hammock. Any added foam pads would of
      course
      > > add compressability and insulative value. If all would not fit
      > into
      > > the sleeve, consider putting the closed cell foam outside on the
      > > tarp etc.
      > >
      > >
      > > Ralph
      > >
      > >
      > > --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, "canoetrip_2000"
      > > <firefly@e...> wrote:
      > > > After I did my post a few weeks ago about how I froze on the
      AT,
      > > not
      > > > in a hammock, in a durn Silshelter, someone said the problem
      > might
      > > > have been with the air mattress I was using, instead of the
      old
      > > > sleeping bag. Smart aleck me, I assumed that was wrong. Now,
      > after
      > > > doing research on the insulating properties of the beloved air
      > > > mattress, the InsulMat, I concede that was surely a factor.
      > > >
      > > > This is not directly about hammocking, but since so many of
      you
      > > know
      > > > much more than me about insulation, I wanted to ask the
      question
      > > > here. I hammock when possible, but when not, I need a lot of
      > > > padding. That's why I took the Insulmat on the trail. They
      make
      > > one
      > > > with down inside, but I do not have another job yet and am
      only
      > > > spending necessary money.
      > > >
      > > > So I was wondering, in order to make the InsulMat warmer, if I
      > got
      > > > the thinnest closed cell foam I could find, and made a sheath
      > for
      > > > it. I have ordered a Big Agnes sleeping bag with all the
      > > insulation
      > > > on top, and a sleeve for attachment of a pad. I am sure that
      > > sleeve
      > > > is not big enough to handle a 3 inch mattress fully inflated,
      > > > surrounded by a sheath of closed cell foam, but I could only
      > > > partially inflate the mattress. I have several Thermarests and
      > > have
      > > > never had a good nights sleep on any of them. This is a major
      > > reason
      > > > I switched to hammocking.
      > > >
      > > > Thanks in advance for your thoughts.
      > > >
      > > > Marsanne

    • Dave Womble
      ... I have a self-inflating 2.5 pad, but I understand that it would be a waste of effort to use. Before I go out and reinvent the wheel I d enjoy hearing what
      Message 2 of 5 , Feb 9 2:16 PM
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        --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, <tjarrell@c...> wrote:
        I have a self-inflating 2.5 pad, but I understand that it would be a
        waste of effort to use. Before I go out and reinvent the wheel I'd
        enjoy hearing what you would recommend.
        >
        > Tom
        >

        Tom,

        I think you may be confusing a previous discussion about a 2.5"
        manually (by mouth) inflated air-filled sleeping mat with what you
        have. If yours is self-inflating, then it figures to have open cell
        foam internal to the mat and this gives it some insulation... if it
        is 2.5" thick, it may have a lot of insulation. Do you have any more
        info about your mat-- manufacturer, length, width, thickness, weight,
        R-value, etc? What you have may work just fine for you, don't throw
        in the towel just yet.

        Youngblood
      • Thomas Jarrell
        Dave, I have a Guide Gear made of 75-denier polyester with a water proof polyurethane coated nylon shell with a self bonding open cell foam inner. It measures
        Message 3 of 5 , Feb 9 6:38 PM
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          Dave,
          I have a Guide Gear made of 75-denier polyester with a water proof polyurethane coated nylon shell with a self bonding open cell foam inner.  It measures 61X26X1.5 without the pillow area inflated, with everything inflated it is 73X26X1.5  Sorry I don't have any R-values.  I'd estimate the weight to be just over two pounds.
           
          Tom
          ----- Original Message -----
          Sent: Monday, February 09, 2004 5:16 PM
          Subject: [Hammock Camping] Re: Pad Insulation

          --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, <tjarrell@c...> wrote:
          I have a self-inflating 2.5 pad, but I understand that it would be a
          waste of effort to use.  Before I go out and reinvent the wheel I'd
          enjoy hearing what you would recommend.
          >
          > Tom
          >

          Tom,

          I think you may be confusing a previous discussion about a 2.5"
          manually (by mouth) inflated air-filled sleeping mat with what you
          have.  If yours is self-inflating, then it figures to have open cell
          foam internal to the mat and this gives it some insulation... if it
          is 2.5" thick, it may have a lot of insulation.  Do you have any more
          info about your mat-- manufacturer, length, width, thickness, weight,
          R-value, etc?  What you have may work just fine for you, don't throw
          in the towel just yet.

          Youngblood

        • Dave Womble
          Tom, I am not familar with that pad, but I am interested in it. It is nice that it is 26 wide, you will appreciate that in your HH. I went to the
          Message 4 of 5 , Feb 9 7:47 PM
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            Tom,

            I am not familar with that pad, but I am interested in it. It is
            nice that it is 26" wide, you will appreciate that in your HH. I
            went to the Sportsman's Guide web site (
            http://www.sportsmansguide.com/cb/cb.asp?a=73979 ) and looked at
            their info, nice price! You're right, can't tell anything about its
            thermal properties and they don't list its weight. With the open
            cell inner foam it will have significant insulation properties... a
            lot more than an air filled mat. It may be up to you to try it out
            and see how well it does. Can you try it out where you have a bail-
            out plan in case it doesn't keep you warm? My guess would be that it
            might be good to about 35 to 45 degrees, but that is only a guess. I
            think everyone here would like to know its weight and how well it
            keeps you warm in your HH, so if you find out please pass the info
            along to us. Good luck and hope you enjoy your hammock.

            If you haven't found this out yet, your butt and then your shoulders
            tend to get cold easiest. It might help alot (about 20 degrees
            worth) if you stacked a 1/4" or 3/8" piece of closed cell foam on top
            of your self inflating pad that was big enough to cover your
            shoulders and butt, usually something that is at least 20" wide and
            36" long. Target, Walmart and most any store that carries camping
            supplies usually have these in 72" lengths and they cost about $10 to
            $15. You can easily cut them with scissors.

            Sorry I couldn't be much help,
            Dave


            --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, "Thomas Jarrell"
            <tjarrell@c...> wrote:
            > Dave,
            > I have a Guide Gear made of 75-denier polyester with a water proof
            polyurethane coated nylon shell with a self bonding open cell foam
            inner. It measures 61X26X1.5 without the pillow area inflated, with
            everything inflated it is 73X26X1.5 Sorry I don't have any R-
            values. I'd estimate the weight to be just over two pounds.
            >
            > Tom
          • tjarrell@cox.net
            Most sincere and heartfelt condolences from a fellow adventurer. Tom From: canoetrip_2000 Date: 2004/02/10 Tue AM 09:52:14 EST To:
            Message 5 of 5 , Feb 10 7:05 AM
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              Stacking is a REALLY good idea, since I have a long thin one and a
              regular one, and the Big Agnes bag has a sleeve. That might be the
              perfect solution, so I am taking them off the market until I get a
              chance to try them. My bag is supposed to be arriving tomorrow, but
              I am 250 miles away. My Dad has been in very bad health for a couple
              of years and passed away yesterday. He was actually an invalid, and
              he lived a long and, until the last few years, mostly very healthy
              life. He is the one who took me camping for the first time, and gave
              me my love of adventure. I am sure he will be watching over me from
              now on.
              Marsanne


              when I'm
              > out with my scouts (sometimes just the silence wakes me up). I
              > always thought it was me, maybe it's the pad. (I just bought a
              > hammock, haven't had a chance to use it yet.)  Before you sell the
              > thermarests, you might want to sty stacking them. (try them at
              home)
              >



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