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Hammock Camping Re: Hand Warmers

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  • geoflyfisher <geoflyfisher@yahoo.com>
    Maybe someone else has a source....Ed ... I did a search... there are several out there, but here is a link to one... A 5 buck experiment might be useful.
    Message 1 of 21 , Feb 6, 2003
      Maybe someone else has a source....Ed
      >
      >
      I did a search... there are several out there, but here is a link to
      one... A 5 buck experiment might be useful.

      http://campingsurvival.com/ezheatreusha.html

      Rick
    • Ed Speer
      TX Rick, I ll check it out...Ed Maybe someone else has a source....Ed ... I did a search... there are several out there, but here is a link to one... A 5 buck
      Message 2 of 21 , Feb 6, 2003
        Message
        TX Rick, I'll check it out...Ed
         
        Maybe someone else has a source....Ed


        I did a search... there are several out there, but here is a link to
        one...  A 5 buck experiment might be useful.

        http://campingsurvival.com/ezheatreusha.html

        Rick
      • J Cornelius
        Some can be re-used - some not - depends on how they are activated - ones I use during hunting season can be re-activated but are not as hot as the first time.
        Message 3 of 21 , Feb 6, 2003

          Some can be re-used – some not – depends on how they are activated – ones I use during hunting season can be re-activated but are not as hot as the first time.

          Jodi

           

          Abnormality IS the normality at this locality!

           

          -----Original Message-----
          From: Ernest Engman <ebengman@...> [mailto:ebengman@...]
          Sent: Thursday, February 06, 2003 8:15 AM
          To: hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com
          Subject: Re: Hammock Camping Hand Warmers

           

          Are these warmers single use or multiple use?

          SGT Rock

          --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, "stephanie <sswaim63@s...>"
          <sswaim63@s...> wrote:
          > I ended up using handwarmers when I used my hammock at the
          > then "record low" (for me) of 30 F. I had bought them on a whim at
          > the last minute when I stopped in a store for some food right
          before
          > getting to the trailhead. That night, shortly after getting in my
          > hammock, I felt my feet getting cold.  I only had a 3/4 Ridgerest
          and
          > part of my body was going to be off it no matter what I did.  I put
          > the hand warmer things in my socks and boy did they work. The
          advice
          > to use 2 pairs of sock and put them between them is good becasue
          > those suckers got too hot. Haveing never used hand warmers before I
          > was pretty surprised by how hot they got and even more so by how
          long
          > they continue to generate heat.  8 hours later they were still hot.
          > So, in my experience they do work.  Although I now just carry two
          > pieces of sleeping pad so that all my body parts can be on them.
          >
          > One of the hand warmer packs set itself off spontaneously in my
          pack
          > and I could feel it against my back, so guess you need to try to
          pack
          > them where they won't be squeezed.
          >
          > stephanie
          >
          >
          >
          > --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, "Ed Speer" <info@s...> wrote:
          > > Yeah Jodi, that's what I'm thinking.  Just wondering if it
          actually
          > > works...Ed


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        • colonelcorn76 <colonelcorn76@yahoo.com>
          Ed, I ve used the same kind. They now come in both 10 & 12 hour versions (don t know if the 12s are new and the 10s are old stock). I haven t had the problems
          Message 4 of 21 , Feb 7, 2003
            Ed,
            I've used the same kind. They now come in both 10 & 12 hour versions
            (don't know if the 12s are new and the 10s are old stock). I haven't
            had the problems you did. They heat up hot & stay very warm through
            the night.

            I do the sock treatment if I'm really really cold or just the
            stomach if I'm just really cold. I tried the hat trick but my head
            got too hot & my feet didn't.

            Try some new ones. You can find them pretty cheap so it's worth an
            experiment or two.

            Jim

            --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, "Ed Speer <info@s...>"
            <info@s...> wrote:
            > The hand warmers I tried last night failed--they lasted only 3 hrs
            > (not the 10 hrs advertised on the package)and never got really
            hot.
            > They were bought in 1999, so maybe they're too old or something.
            > They were HOTHANDS-2 by Heatmax; the iron fillings type. Each
            pouch
            > is 2" X 3.5" and weighs 0.6 oz. Has anyone else had a similar
            > experience or tried a different kind?...Ed
          • Ed Speer
            Thanks Jim, I will try some new ones. The warmth advantages for something that weights only 0.6 oz is well worth some more testing....Ed Ed, I ve used the
            Message 5 of 21 , Feb 7, 2003
              Message
              Thanks Jim, I will try some new ones.  The warmth advantages for something that weights only 0.6 oz is well worth some more testing....Ed
              Ed,
              I've used the same kind. They now come in both 10 & 12 hour versions
              (don't know if the 12s are new and the 10s are old stock). I haven't
              had the problems you did. They heat up hot & stay very warm through
              the night.

              I do the sock treatment if I'm really really cold or just the
              stomach if I'm just really cold. I tried the hat trick but my head
              got too hot & my feet didn't.

              Try some new ones. You can find them pretty cheap so it's worth an
              experiment or two.

              Jim

              --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, "Ed Speer <info@s...>"
              <info@s...> wrote:
              > The hand warmers I tried last night failed--they lasted only 3 hrs
              > (not the 10 hrs advertised on the package)and never got really
              hot. 
              > They were bought in 1999, so maybe they're too old or something. 
              > They were HOTHANDS-2 by Heatmax; the iron fillings type.  Each
              pouch
              > is 2" X 3.5" and weighs 0.6 oz.  Has anyone else had a similar
              > experience or tried a different kind?...Ed

            • stephanie
              Hi Ed, The handwarmers I used were also HeatMax but they are called foot warmups . They weigh 1.5 oz for a 2 pack in packaging. The instructions say they will
              Message 6 of 21 , Feb 8, 2003
                Hi Ed,

                The handwarmers I used were also HeatMax but they are called "foot
                warmups". They weigh 1.5 oz for a 2 pack in packaging.
                The instructions say they will have max heat of 110F for 6 hours but they
                sure felt hotter than that to me. And lasted longer. Now, I remember I had
                two different sized and so the other ones were probably the "hothands",
                which an internet search says lasts up to 10 hours at 135 or so, ..I can't
                find those now though. I'm pretty sure the foot warmer ones were the ones
                I used though. I saw they had a 5 year shelf life. I'd try again if I were
                you.

                The reusable kind of warmers, I'm not positive, but think that they last a
                much shorter time, like an hour or two. I looked on internet but none of
                the places I looked at that sell them mentioned how long they last. Which
                amazes me since that is a very pertinent piece of information and ought to
                be included in ads for the product!

                I slept in my hammock again at about 32 degrees last night. It's the crazy
                crib and used a 3/4 Ridgerest and a 23 inch wide 3/8 inch blue foam pad. I
                have a 15 degree bag that I use as a quilt with the foot zipped up so my
                feet are in a foot pocket.My shoulders and hips are wide and I'm tired of
                trying to stay perfectly positioned to stay on them and keep from getting
                cold spots. I got another piece I use like a tee where my shoulders are so
                it wraps around them. I'm going to try the Target 27 inch wide pad. If
                that doesn't work I'm going to find one of those 40 inch wide pads or else
                cut and paste other pads together to get more width. The Crib has a pad
                sleeve but can only accept up to a 23 inch or so pad. I was warm last
                night though. I tried sleeping in just underwear but then my legs got cold
                even if they barely touched any part of the hammock...so I ended up
                sleeping in long underwear. I bought a little cheap thermometer so that i
                could get an idea of what the temperature actually was when out
                hiking. Unfortunately I think it's useless as it said it was 20 degrees
                and I'm sure it wasn't that cold. There was no ice in my water or anything
                at any rate. maybe it was measuring wind chill as I'm sure the wind chill
                was 20 degrees or less. I was camped in a valley by a creek and the wind
                was gusting, calm one minute, then 20 mph or so the next. You could hear it
                coming up the valley, pretty neat. I had my tarp set up just as a
                windbreak so I could see the stars, but the wind changed direction and so I
                was getting it full force sometimes..i didn't get cold so didn't bother to
                get up and change tarp configuration.

                I also found out how one falls out of a hammock. I've never had any
                problem with feeling like I'm going to tip out of a hammock, and kinda
                didn't understand why people would say that was a concern. Well for some
                reason,something about the way I entered the hammock last night the first
                time was different from what I've been doing. Swung my legs in and
                kaplump!...before I knew what happened I'd flipped over and was on the
                ground on the other side...pretty comical really. The only bad thing is
                that the incident tore the bug netting at the foot of the Crib (which is
                part of a BGT test).

                stephanie






                >The hand warmers I tried last night failed--they lasted only 3 hrs
                >(not the 10 hrs advertised on the package)and never got really hot.
                >They were bought in 1999, so maybe they're too old or something.
                >They were HOTHANDS-2 by Heatmax; the iron fillings type. Each pouch
                i>s 2" X 3.5" and weighs 0.6 oz. Has anyone else had a similar
                >experience or tried a different kind?...Ed
              • Ed Speer
                Thanks Stephanie, I hope to try some new Hot Hands soon. I m very intrigued by the long-lasting, light weight warmers...ED Hi Ed, The handwarmers I used were
                Message 7 of 21 , Feb 10, 2003
                  Message
                  Thanks Stephanie, I hope to try some new Hot Hands soon.  I'm very intrigued by the long-lasting, light weight warmers...ED
                  Hi Ed,

                  The handwarmers I used were also HeatMax but they are called "foot
                  warmups". They weigh 1.5 oz for a 2 pack in packaging.
                  The instructions say they will have max heat of 110F for 6 hours but they
                  sure felt hotter than that to me. And lasted longer. Now, I remember I had
                  two different sized and so the other ones were probably the "hothands",
                  which an internet search says lasts up to 10 hours at 135 or so, ..I can't
                  find those now though.  I'm pretty sure the foot warmer ones were the ones
                  I used though.  I saw they had a 5 year shelf life. I'd try again if I were
                  you.

                  The reusable kind of warmers, I'm not positive, but think that they last a
                  much shorter time, like an hour or two. I looked on internet but none of
                  the places I looked at that sell them mentioned how long they last. Which
                  amazes me since that is a very pertinent piece of information and ought to
                  be included in ads for the product!

                  I slept in my hammock again at about 32 degrees last night. It's the crazy
                  crib and used a 3/4 Ridgerest and a 23 inch wide 3/8 inch blue foam pad.  I
                  have a 15 degree bag that I use as a quilt with the foot zipped up so my
                  feet are in a foot pocket.My shoulders and hips are wide and I'm tired of
                  trying to stay perfectly positioned to stay on them and keep from getting
                  cold spots.  I got another piece I use like a tee where my shoulders are so
                  it wraps around them. I'm going to try the Target 27 inch wide pad.  If
                  that doesn't work I'm going to find one of those 40 inch wide pads or else
                  cut and paste    other pads together to get more width. The Crib has a pad
                  sleeve but can only accept up to a 23 inch or so pad.  I was warm last
                  night though. I tried sleeping in just underwear but then my legs got cold
                  even if they barely touched any part of the hammock...so I ended up
                  sleeping in long underwear. I bought a little cheap thermometer so that i
                  could get an idea of what the temperature actually was when out
                  hiking.  Unfortunately I think it's useless as it said it was 20 degrees
                  and I'm sure it wasn't that cold. There was no ice in my water or anything
                  at any rate. maybe it was measuring wind chill as I'm sure the wind chill
                  was 20 degrees or less.  I was camped in a valley by a creek and the wind
                  was gusting, calm one minute, then 20 mph or so the next. You could hear it
                  coming up the valley, pretty neat.  I had my tarp set up just as a
                  windbreak so I could see the stars, but the wind changed direction and so I
                  was getting it full force sometimes..i didn't get cold so didn't bother to
                  get up and change tarp configuration.

                  I also found out how one falls out of a hammock.  I've never had any
                  problem with feeling like I'm going to tip out of a hammock, and kinda
                  didn't understand why people would say that was a concern.  Well for some
                  reason,something about the way I entered the hammock last night the first
                  time was different from what I've been doing.  Swung my legs in and
                  kaplump!...before I knew what happened I'd flipped over and was on the
                  ground on the other side...pretty comical really.  The only bad thing is
                  that the incident tore the bug netting at the foot of the Crib (which is
                  part of a BGT test).

                  stephanie
                • colonelcorn76 <colonelcorn76@yahoo.com>
                  Ed/Rick, I decided to check up on the EZHeat reusable heat packs to see if they were an acceptable substitute for the more traditional disposable hand warmers.
                  Message 8 of 21 , Feb 20, 2003
                    Ed/Rick,

                    I decided to check up on the EZHeat reusable heat packs to see if
                    they were an acceptable substitute for the more traditional
                    disposable hand warmers.

                    I ordered two EZHeat packs from campingsurvival.com and they arrived
                    yesterday. These packs are heavy clear plastic packages 4.75" x 3.5"
                    x .75". They contain a hard white substance and a dark round metal
                    disk about .5" dia. The directions for use are printed on the
                    plastic. It also notes that it contains "sodium acetate (food
                    grade)" and water.

                    To recharge these you are to place it (wrapped in a cloth) in
                    boiling water for 10 minutes. Then after letting it cool you can
                    activate it to release the heat.

                    These appear to be a phase change material that is solid when used
                    and liquefies & turns clear when placed in the boiling water batch.
                    The metal disc then floats in the substance.

                    I boiled one up last night and let it cool overnight. This morning I
                    activated the pouch (you bend the disk through the plastic bag and
                    it magically turns to a crystalline gel that starts to harden as it
                    releases heat --- pretty cool...my guess is that the energy of the
                    disc snapping is enough to kick the liquid material over some
                    threshold that causes the phase change and releases the heat).

                    It heated up rapidly become hot (not extremely hot but not just warm
                    either) to the touch. I placed it between my down jacket and my
                    shirt on my stomach as I would if I were in my sleeping bag. After
                    an hour it was merely warm to the touch and after two it was only
                    marginally warmer than the ambient air (office). After two and a
                    half it was solid and room temperature.

                    My intention was to do a detailed test taking the heat pack's
                    temperature over a period of time to see how it stacked up against
                    traditional metal filings based hand warmers but based on this
                    initial test, it is woefully inadequate for the task of adding extra
                    warmth for a night's sleep in a cold hammock scenario. They will be
                    ok for those time when you want a quick heat pack but not for
                    anything where more than an hour or so of significant warmth is
                    needed.

                    So, you can save yourself the $5 test (although I did buy a neat
                    Lensatic Compass while I was getting these so all is not wasted
                    <grin>).

                    Jim

                    --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, "Ed Speer" <info@s...> wrote:
                    > TX Rick, I'll check it out...Ed
                    >
                    >
                    > Maybe someone else has a source....Ed
                    > >
                    > >
                    > I did a search... there are several out there, but here is a link
                    to
                    > one... A 5 buck experiment might be useful.
                    >
                    > http://campingsurvival.com/ezheatreusha.html
                    >
                    > Rick
                  • Ed Speer
                    Thanks for the info, Jim. Looks like the search continues.....Ed ... From: colonelcorn76 [mailto:colonelcorn76@yahoo.com] Sent:
                    Message 9 of 21 , Feb 20, 2003
                      Message
                      Thanks for the info, Jim.  Looks like the search continues.....Ed
                       
                      -----Original Message-----
                      From: colonelcorn76 <colonelcorn76@...> [mailto:colonelcorn76@...]
                      Sent: Thursday, February 20, 2003 11:01 AM
                      To: hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com
                      Subject: Hammock Camping Re: Hand Warmers

                      Ed/Rick,

                      I decided to check up on the EZHeat reusable heat packs to see if
                      they were an acceptable substitute for the more traditional
                      disposable hand warmers.

                      I ordered two EZHeat packs from campingsurvival.com and they arrived
                      yesterday. These packs are heavy clear plastic packages 4.75" x 3.5"
                      x .75". They contain a hard white substance and a dark round metal
                      disk about .5" dia. The directions for use are printed on the
                      plastic. It also notes that it contains "sodium acetate (food
                      grade)" and water.

                      To recharge these you are to place it (wrapped in a cloth) in
                      boiling water for 10 minutes. Then after letting it cool you can
                      activate it to release the heat.

                      These appear to be a phase change material that is solid when used
                      and liquefies & turns clear when placed in the boiling water batch.
                      The metal disc then floats in the substance.

                      I boiled one up last night and let it cool overnight. This morning I
                      activated the pouch (you bend the disk through the plastic bag and
                      it magically turns to a crystalline gel that starts to harden as it
                      releases heat --- pretty cool...my guess is that the energy of the
                      disc snapping is enough to kick the liquid material over some
                      threshold that causes the phase change and releases the heat).

                      It heated up rapidly become hot (not extremely hot but not just warm
                      either) to the touch. I placed it between my down jacket and my
                      shirt on my stomach as I would if I were in my sleeping bag. After
                      an hour it was merely warm to the touch and after two it was only
                      marginally warmer than the ambient air (office). After two and a
                      half it was solid and room temperature.

                      My intention was to do a detailed test taking the heat pack's
                      temperature over a period of time to see how it stacked up against
                      traditional metal filings based hand warmers but based on this
                      initial test, it is woefully inadequate for the task of adding extra
                      warmth for a night's sleep in a cold hammock scenario. They will be
                      ok for those time when you want a quick heat pack but not for
                      anything where more than an hour or so of significant warmth is
                      needed.

                      So, you can save yourself the $5 test (although I did buy a neat
                      Lensatic Compass while I was getting these so all is not wasted
                      <grin>).

                      Jim

                      --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, "Ed Speer" <info@s...> wrote:
                      > TX Rick, I'll check it out...Ed

                      >
                      > Maybe someone else has a source....Ed
                      > > 
                      > > 
                      > I did a search... there are several out there, but here is a link
                      to
                      > one...  A 5 buck experiment might be useful.
                      >
                      > http://campingsurvival.com/ezheatreusha.html
                      >
                      > Rick



                      To unsubscribe from this group, send an email to:
                      hammockcamping-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com



                      Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to the Yahoo! Terms of Service.
                    • geoflyfisher <geoflyfisher@yahoo.com>
                      Thanks for the review... Yep, this is the way I remember them too... Not intended to keep you warm all night, but if the toes get cold toward morning, one
                      Message 10 of 21 , Feb 20, 2003
                        Thanks for the review...

                        Yep, this is the way I remember them too... Not intended to keep you
                        warm all night, but if the toes get cold toward morning, one could
                        snap one and put it down in the foot of the quilt to warm up a little
                        before getting up. Good news is that you can recharge it while
                        cooking coffee water after getting up. Intended for comfort, not
                        survival.

                        Rick



                        --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, "colonelcorn76
                        <colonelcorn76@y...>" <colonelcorn76@y...> wrote:
                        > Ed/Rick,
                        >
                        > I decided to check up on the EZHeat reusable heat packs to see if
                        > they were an acceptable substitute for the more traditional
                        > disposable hand warmers.
                        >
                        > I ordered two EZHeat packs from campingsurvival.com and they
                        arrived
                        > yesterday. These packs are heavy clear plastic packages 4.75" x
                        3.5"
                        > x .75". They contain a hard white substance and a dark round metal
                        > disk about .5" dia. The directions for use are printed on the
                        > plastic. It also notes that it contains "sodium acetate (food
                        > grade)" and water.
                        >
                        > To recharge these you are to place it (wrapped in a cloth) in
                        > boiling water for 10 minutes. Then after letting it cool you can
                        > activate it to release the heat.
                        >
                        > These appear to be a phase change material that is solid when used
                        > and liquefies & turns clear when placed in the boiling water batch.
                        > The metal disc then floats in the substance.
                        >
                        > I boiled one up last night and let it cool overnight. This morning
                        I
                        > activated the pouch (you bend the disk through the plastic bag and
                        > it magically turns to a crystalline gel that starts to harden as it
                        > releases heat --- pretty cool...my guess is that the energy of the
                        > disc snapping is enough to kick the liquid material over some
                        > threshold that causes the phase change and releases the heat).
                        >
                        > It heated up rapidly become hot (not extremely hot but not just
                        warm
                        > either) to the touch. I placed it between my down jacket and my
                        > shirt on my stomach as I would if I were in my sleeping bag. After
                        > an hour it was merely warm to the touch and after two it was only
                        > marginally warmer than the ambient air (office). After two and a
                        > half it was solid and room temperature.
                        >
                        > My intention was to do a detailed test taking the heat pack's
                        > temperature over a period of time to see how it stacked up against
                        > traditional metal filings based hand warmers but based on this
                        > initial test, it is woefully inadequate for the task of adding
                        extra
                        > warmth for a night's sleep in a cold hammock scenario. They will be
                        > ok for those time when you want a quick heat pack but not for
                        > anything where more than an hour or so of significant warmth is
                        > needed.
                        >
                        > So, you can save yourself the $5 test (although I did buy a neat
                        > Lensatic Compass while I was getting these so all is not wasted
                        > <grin>).
                        >
                        > Jim
                        >
                        > --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, "Ed Speer" <info@s...> wrote:
                        > > TX Rick, I'll check it out...Ed
                        > >
                        > >
                        > > Maybe someone else has a source....Ed
                        > > >
                        > > >
                        > > I did a search... there are several out there, but here is a link
                        > to
                        > > one... A 5 buck experiment might be useful.
                        > >
                        > > http://campingsurvival.com/ezheatreusha.html
                        > >
                        > > Rick
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