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Personal cold record!

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  • Risk
    Another saga of the cold: Last night I took the opportunity to check out one of the edges of the envelope. The snow was pecularly crunchy as I walked out to
    Message 1 of 6 , Jan 31, 2004
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      Another saga of the cold:

      Last night I took the opportunity to check out one of the edges of the
      envelope.

      The snow was pecularly crunchy as I walked out to two exposed trees.
      Frigid air froze in my nostrils as I began tying the hammock up. The
      cloth of the hammock seemed no more stiff than normal, but those
      pieces of blue Target pad sure seemed a lot more stiff than usual.

      I was wearing fingerless gloves so I could use my fingers to set up
      the hammock and its equipment. I had to stop every few minutes to
      warm up the ends of the fingers.

      Did I mention? The outside air temperature was -5.1 degrees by my
      weather station digital thermometer, just before I stepped outdoors.

      I was wearing a cotton tee, nylon swim suit, microfleece pants, a
      fleece top, and a pair of poly socks. On my head, I had a Psolar BX
      balaclava. I was wearing a jacket as well.

      I set up the WarmHammock with an OverlapPad, overlapped the length of
      the hammock about a foot. Inside the footbox of my Risk's Bag quilt,
      I had stuffed a 24x18 inch piece of target pad. I rested my feet on
      that piece as I tucked my feet in the bag and laid down.

      Over the outside of the hammock and quilt, the TravelPod was zipped
      up. I took the coat off and used it as a pillow and to take up space
      in the head of the hammock.

      In my pockets, I carried a small handiwipe towel to occasionally clean
      frost off the inside of the TravelPod above my mouth. I had a knife
      incase the zipper froze and I was trapped in the TravelPod. I also
      carried my IR thermometer in a pocket.

      Ten minutes after zipping up the TravelPod, my fingers had warmed up
      and I was feeling nice and toasty. Inside temperature of the quilt
      over my navel was 69 F. Skin temperature there was 79 F. Temperature
      of the coat I was using as a pillow was 28 F. Temperature of the
      outside of the warm hammock (inside the TravelPod) was 14 F.

      I woke up about 2 hours later and did a second set of temperature
      measurements. Inside the quilt, it was 72 F. Inside my fleece,
      abdominal temperature was 88 F. The pillow coat was 18 F and the
      outside of the hammock was 10 F. The outside air temperature was
      later found to be -10 F with 10 mph wind at this point. That makes
      for a wind chill of -28 F.

      Morning was approaching at 0430 when I decided (lonliness) to go back
      inside and warm up next to EllieD. I felt very warm in the hammock.
      However, when I unzipped the Pod and turned to put on my shoes, I
      found that I had involuntary cramping of both my calves. From these
      "Charley Horses" I believe that the muscles were a chilled.

      BTW, I put my glasses on and turned on a head light as I was opening
      the Travel Pod. It was a total gas to see the steam rising from the
      sleeping pad and the hammock as I opened the TravelPod! That pod had
      trapped a lot of warm moist air. Now it was suddenly released into
      the black of the cold early morning.

      I untied the knots from the trees, zipped the pod up around the quilta
      and hammock and carried the bundle inside, Santa style.

      I went ahead and got up at 0600, dressed and took a 4 mile day hike
      with a hiking friend in Glenn Helen, a local park. For reasons I
      could not understand, there were no other hikers. It warmed up to -3
      degrees before we finished at 0930!

      Thanks for reading this account of a cold night.

      Risk
    • Ray Garlington
      ... Rick laughs at the cold!!! was minus 10F the coldest temp for that night? Sounds like your gear performed beautifully. one question: your overlap pad is
      Message 2 of 6 , Feb 1, 2004
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        --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, "Risk" <ra1@i...> wrote:
        > Another saga of the cold:

        Rick laughs at the cold!!!

        was minus 10F the coldest temp for that night? Sounds like your gear
        performed beautifully. one question: your overlap pad is the "T"
        shaped pad right? You said it overlapped the length of the hammock
        by about a foot. could you explain this part a little more.
        Thanks & congratulations,
        Ray
      • Rick
        ... Hi Ray, I took a standard Target Pad, 27x72 in and cut it into two pieces that are 27x36 in. For a standard hammock with no attached insulation, I usually
        Message 3 of 6 , Feb 1, 2004
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          Ray Garlington wrote:
          --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, "Risk" <ra1@i...> wrote:
            
          Another saga of the cold:
              
          Rick laughs at the cold!!!
          
          was minus 10F the coldest temp for that night?  Sounds like your gear 
          performed beautifully.  one question:  your overlap pad is the "T" 
          shaped pad right?  You said it overlapped the length of the hammock 
          by about a foot.  could you explain this part a little more.
          Thanks & congratulations,
          Ray
            
          Hi Ray,

          I took a standard Target Pad, 27x72 in and cut it into two pieces that are 27x36 in. 

          For a standard hammock with no attached insulation, I usually overlap those two pieces side by side, overlapped about 12 inches so it is a pad which is 40 in wide, 36 in long, and double thick in the middle.  This works very well in double bottomed hammocks.

          For the really cold weather, I used the WarmHammock and I put the two pads in so they overlapped about a foot right under my bottom.  It ended up being a pad about 5 feet long and thicker for the center foot. 

          As for temperature, it was -9 for about 4 hours of the night, but the weather service recorded a -10 at O-dark-thirty which was a record low for Dayton for the date. 

          Rick
        • Coy
          Rick Why not just use 2 full pads. Dont weigh that much and you dont have to worry about any cold spots. Yes it is a little bulky but I tie mine vertacally
          Message 4 of 6 , Feb 1, 2004
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            Rick

            Why not just use 2 full pads. Dont weigh that much and you dont
            have to worry about any cold spots. Yes it is a little bulky but I
            tie mine vertacally outside my pack and they only take up the width
            of the pack. You may be using yours for pack support inside the
            pack and the full length may take up too much room? Untill I get a
            peapod or a DAM (or something similar) I just resign myelf to this
            bulky solution.

            Coy Boy

            --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, Rick <ra1@i...> wrote:
            > Ray Garlington wrote:
            >
            > >--- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, "Risk" <ra1@i...> wrote:
            > >
            > >
            > >>Another saga of the cold:
            > >>
            > >>
            > >
            > >Rick laughs at the cold!!!
            > >
            > >was minus 10F the coldest temp for that night? Sounds like your
            gear
            > >performed beautifully. one question: your overlap pad is
            the "T"
            > >shaped pad right? You said it overlapped the length of the
            hammock
            > >by about a foot. could you explain this part a little more.
            > >Thanks & congratulations,
            > >Ray
            > >
            > >
            > Hi Ray,
            >
            > I took a standard Target Pad, 27x72 in and cut it into two pieces
            that
            > are 27x36 in.
            >
            > For a standard hammock with no attached insulation, I usually
            overlap
            > those two pieces side by side, overlapped about 12 inches so it is
            a pad
            > which is 40 in wide, 36 in long, and double thick in the middle.
            This
            > works very well in double bottomed hammocks.
            >
            > For the really cold weather, I used the WarmHammock and I put the
            two
            > pads in so they overlapped about a foot right under my bottom. It
            ended
            > up being a pad about 5 feet long and thicker for the center foot.
            >
            > As for temperature, it was -9 for about 4 hours of the night, but
            the
            > weather service recorded a -10 at O-dark-thirty which was a record
            low
            > for Dayton for the date.
            >
            > Rick
          • subypower
            hay rick i am glad you are keep some safty equipment with you ie your knife i bet the first time you had the thought of the zipper freezing and then remembered
            Message 5 of 6 , Feb 3, 2004
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              hay rick i am glad you are keep some safty equipment with you ie your
              knife

              i bet the first time you had the thought of the zipper freezing and
              then remembered the knife you slept a little better but might i
              suggest your cell phone if you have service in the yard, just in case
              the cramps turn in to a fall on your face pain. and if no service how
              about one of the small air horns

              white knight
            • Ralph Oborn
              cell phone can also order in a pizza :] Ralph i ... case
              Message 6 of 6 , Feb 3, 2004
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                cell phone can also order in a pizza :]


                Ralph
                i
                > suggest your cell phone if you have service in the yard, just in
                case
                >
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