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Re: Down Peapod -- first impressions

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  • Risk
    ... Hi Tripp, My experiments lead me to believe that adding a thin foam pad between you and the hammock, even a small one, say 20 x 24 in) will work very well
    Message 1 of 5 , Jan 29, 2004
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      Tripp wrote:
      >
      > My tentative conclusion, based on this extremely limited test, is
      > that the down peapod works, and that Ed's posted temperature ratings
      > are pretty darn close (and remember, I am a cold sleeper). Ed's
      > site says:
      >
      > "Combination DOWN PeaPod and DOWN Top Blanket Temperature Ratings:
      > PeaPod w/ Top Blanket as quilt inside hammock 35F"
      >
      > And that is pretty close to what I had (substitute the top blanket
      > for my sleeping bag).
      >
      > My "guesstimation" is that this setup (including the extra
      > insulation of the vest) and my "normal" cold weather sleeping
      > clothing (addition of mid-weight doufold "long johns" type pants,
      > long sleeve duofold shirt, and a fleece jacket) would take me
      > comfortably to the mid 20's.
      >
      Hi Tripp,

      My experiments lead me to believe that adding a thin foam pad between
      you and the hammock, even a small one, say 20 x 24 in) will work very
      well with the PeaPod to take one comfortably much lower. Try it out
      and let us know.

      Oh, tonight is predicted to get down to about 0 here and Friday night
      maybe lower. However, with Shane's -24 F record, I am working only
      toward my own experience. Last time we got that cold was in the '70s -
      and besides - what's the point? (it's there)

      Rick
    • Tripp Clark
      Well, it took almost two months before I got a chance to test the down peapod in the backcountry, but finally, on March 12, I was able to get back out for
      Message 2 of 5 , Mar 25, 2004
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        Well, it took almost two months before I got a chance to test the
        down peapod in the backcountry, but finally, on March 12, I was able
        to get back out for another section hike on the AT. We were out for
        3 nights, starting late afternoon on Friday from Low Gap, TN (just
        below Damascus) and heading scouth, ending on Monday afternoon at
        Dennis Cove Road.

        The first night out was the coldest. I used basically the same
        setup as described in the original post below.

        * Speer 8.0A hammock (with tarp but without bug net)
        * Down Peapod with 1 oz overstuffing on the down
        * REI SubKilo down sleeping bag (20 degree rating) used as a top
        blanket
        * I put a down vest (which I carry winter camping) between
        the peapod and the hammock bottom (vest was unzipped and open)
        underneath my torso
        * I was dressed in smartwool socks; duofold "long johns" pants;
        a long sleeve turtleneck duofold shirt; mid-weight fleece jacket;
        and turtle fur fleece hat

        By the way, I consider myself to be a very cold sleeper.

        Friday night it dropped to 23 degrees. There was a gentle breeze,
        but for the most part the air was calm. Inside the peapod but
        outside of my sleeping bag, I checked the temperature at various
        times throughout the night and morning and always found it to be in
        the 60's. I slept warm . . . perhaps too warm at times . . . and
        had to unzip my jacket and open up the peapod a little more at times
        to let some of the warm air out.

        The second night it was about 10 degrees warmer. I opted to dress a
        little lighter and only used the sleeping bag in the hours just
        before dawn when it was coolest.

        The final night on Pond Flats was balmy, by comparison, with the
        temp getting to just below 40 degrees. I stayed with the lighter
        clothing and did not even unpack the sleeping bag, but instead
        relied on the peapod alone for warmth. Again, just before dawn was
        the only time that I got a little cool. At that point, if I had had
        the sleeping bag at easy grasp I would have used it, but I was not
        uncomfortable enough to warrant getting out the bag.

        All in all, I was very pleased. This showed me that my setup can
        easily keep me comfortable to the low 20's, and probably a little
        below that.

        If all goes well, I'll get to go back this weekend for a single
        overnighter to finish up the next small section (14 miles) into
        Damascus. I can't wait!!

        Tripp


        --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, "Tripp Clark"
        <trippclark@m...> wrote:
        > I got home this evening and was excited to find that my new Speer
        > hammock and down peapod had arrived. For perspective, note that I
        > already own and am very happy with two Hennessy Hammocks
        (Backpacker
        > Ultra-lite & Expedition A-Sym) both purchased within the past
        year;
        > but, like most of you, have found cold weather to be the Achille's
        > Heel.
        >
        > So, here I am, new cold weather gear and it is 33 degrees in my
        > backyard. So what do I do -- take it outside for a test, of
        > course. Before I go into my test, I should point out that the
        > craftsmanship and quality appears to be excellent, and delivery
        time
        > was right at one week (not bad for a custom order!!).
        >
        > Here was my set up . . .
        >
        > * Speer 8.0A hammock (without tarp)
        > * Down Peapod with 1 oz overstuffing on the down (this is
        > the "custom order" part I referred to above)
        > * REI SubKilo down sleeping bag (20 degree rating) used as a top
        > blanket
        > * I put a down vest (which I always carry winter camping) between
        > the peapod and the hammock bottom (vest was unzipped and open)
        > underneath my torso
        > * I had a therm-a-rest pillow beneath my head (primarily for
        > elevation and added comfort, but I guess it has insulation value
        > also)
        > * I was dressed in lightweight socks; thin, synthetic hiking
        pants;
        > a "regular" 50/50 blend sweatshirt (which I would normally not
        wear
        > hiking, but it was convenient); turtle fur fleece hat
        >
        > By the way, I consider myself to be a very cold sleeper.
        >
        > I stayed in the hammock, reading a book, for the better part of
        one
        > hour. I felt that this was long enough to get a good idea of fow
        > warm/cold I would be at temps right around freezing.
        >
        > Well, I can report that I was warm . . . toasty warm in fact! As
        an
        > added test, shortly before I returned to the house where my wife,
        I
        > am sure, thought I had totally lost my mind, I removed the down
        vest
        > that was underneath me. When I did this, I did notice a slight
        > change in that I felt slightly cool underneath. Mind you, it was
        > not cold, but enough for me to certainly tell that this added
        > insulation is worthwhile.
        >
        > As I said earlier, temperature was 33 degrees. There was no wind,
        > so I cannot report as to how well it blocks wind, which we all
        know
        > can draw heat away from an uninsulated hammock quickly.
        >
        > My tentative conclusion, based on this extremely limited test, is
        > that the down peapod works, and that Ed's posted temperature
        ratings
        > are pretty darn close (and remember, I am a cold sleeper). Ed's
        > site says:
        >
        > "Combination DOWN PeaPod and DOWN Top Blanket Temperature Ratings:
        > PeaPod w/ Top Blanket as quilt inside hammock 35F"
        >
        > And that is pretty close to what I had (substitute the top blanket
        > for my sleeping bag).
        >
        > My "guesstimation" is that this setup (including the extra
        > insulation of the vest) and my "normal" cold weather sleeping
        > clothing (addition of mid-weight doufold "long johns" type pants,
        > long sleeve duofold shirt, and a fleece jacket) would take me
        > comfortably to the mid 20's.
        >
        > I can't hardly wait to try it for a full night in the backcountry,
        > and I am really curious as to how it will do with a cool breeze
        > blowing, but so far I am impressed.
        >
        > I'll let y'all know when I have more experience with the down
        peapod
        > and can report more.
      • Ed Speer
        Thanks for the report Tripp--sounds like a great hike. Any chance you can make our hammock hangers campout this weekend? ...Ed Moderator, Hammock
        Message 3 of 5 , Mar 25, 2004
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          Thanks for the report Tripp--sounds like a great hike. Any chance you can
          make our hammock hangers campout this weekend? ...Ed Moderator, Hammock
          Camping-L

          > -----Original Message-----
          > From: Tripp Clark [mailto:trippclark@...]
          > Sent: Thursday, March 25, 2004 10:10 AM
          > To: hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com
          > Subject: [Hammock Camping] Re: Down Peapod -- first impressions
          >
          >
          > Well, it took almost two months before I got a chance to test the
          > down peapod in the backcountry, but finally, on March 12, I was able
          > to get back out for another section hike on the AT. We were out for
          > 3 nights, starting late afternoon on Friday from Low Gap, TN (just
          > below Damascus) and heading scouth, ending on Monday afternoon at
          > Dennis Cove Road.
          >
          > The first night out was the coldest. I used basically the same
          > setup as described in the original post below.
          >
          > * Speer 8.0A hammock (with tarp but without bug net)
          > * Down Peapod with 1 oz overstuffing on the down
          > * REI SubKilo down sleeping bag (20 degree rating) used as a top
          > blanket
          > * I put a down vest (which I carry winter camping) between
          > the peapod and the hammock bottom (vest was unzipped and open)
          > underneath my torso
          > * I was dressed in smartwool socks; duofold "long johns" pants;
          > a long sleeve turtleneck duofold shirt; mid-weight fleece jacket;
          > and turtle fur fleece hat
          >
          > By the way, I consider myself to be a very cold sleeper.
          >
          > Friday night it dropped to 23 degrees. There was a gentle breeze,
          > but for the most part the air was calm. Inside the peapod but
          > outside of my sleeping bag, I checked the temperature at various
          > times throughout the night and morning and always found it to be in
          > the 60's. I slept warm . . . perhaps too warm at times . . . and
          > had to unzip my jacket and open up the peapod a little more at times
          > to let some of the warm air out.
          >
          > The second night it was about 10 degrees warmer. I opted to dress a
          > little lighter and only used the sleeping bag in the hours just
          > before dawn when it was coolest.
          >
          > The final night on Pond Flats was balmy, by comparison, with the
          > temp getting to just below 40 degrees. I stayed with the lighter
          > clothing and did not even unpack the sleeping bag, but instead
          > relied on the peapod alone for warmth. Again, just before dawn was
          > the only time that I got a little cool. At that point, if I had had
          > the sleeping bag at easy grasp I would have used it, but I was not
          > uncomfortable enough to warrant getting out the bag.
          >
          > All in all, I was very pleased. This showed me that my setup can
          > easily keep me comfortable to the low 20's, and probably a little
          > below that.
          >
          > If all goes well, I'll get to go back this weekend for a single
          > overnighter to finish up the next small section (14 miles) into
          > Damascus. I can't wait!!
          >
          > Tripp
          >
          >
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