Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

TripReport: AT, last week(LONG)

Expand Messages
  • canoetrip_2000
    First, let me say how glad I am I got off Friday instead of staying up there for two weeks, like I had planned. I am in Atlanta, at the home of friends, safe,
    Message 1 of 10 , Jan 26, 2004
    • 0 Attachment
      First, let me say how glad I am I got off Friday instead of staying
      up there for two weeks, like I had planned. I am in Atlanta, at the
      home of friends, safe, warm, dry, rested.

      I started at Springer one week ago (MLK Day), but only managed to
      put my, uh, dang Silshelter down in the parking lot at Springer and
      bed down for the night.
      I MISSED MY HAMMOCK THE ENTIRE TIME.

      But, after being at the Ruck in South CArolina over the weekend, I
      became convinced it would be foolhardy to go out with it without the
      proper insulation, which I do not now have. So, I begged one of the
      Women Hikers to sell me her nice air mattress, and I let
      them "Tuckerize" me (go through my pack and make me mad...) and got
      a ride to Springer, but about 4 hours later than I had planned.
      Packing, especially when scared to death, takes a L O N G time.

      It was supposed to get into the 20's. I have a TNF Zero Degree rated
      down bag. It got down to about 10, and I was miserable that first
      night. The bag has, clearly, lost lots of its loft, something the 40-
      degree winter nights in Louisiana would not tell me...

      I started hiking Tuesday around noon, after spending the morning
      melting ice and warming up. I love to hike in the cold...I made it
      to a shelter...Gooch, I think, and slept like a baby.

      The weather was perfect, except I had an ongoing battle with the
      cold at night, which exhausted me. Wednesday, I made it to Hawk Mtn,
      another nice night.

      Then, Thursday, I saw a road, with people, and cars, and I had an
      intense craving for V-8 juice and cookies. So I walked into Suches
      and ate for about half an hour, had 3 V-8s, loaded up my pack with
      goodies, looked in the mirror, washed my hands with soap and hot
      running water, etc. A VERY cute young man gave me a ride to the
      trailhead and I got water from the spring and went on. This was at
      about 3 or 4. I forget.

      THIS WAS THE PART WHERE I WOULD HAVE JUST DONE ABOUT ANYTHING FOR A
      WELL INSULATED HAMMOCK because I had a horrendous time finding a
      place to camp that was not either windy or steep. I ended up putting
      on my headlamp and doing something I never do, which is proceeding
      down a trail at dusk, just looking for a flat camping spot. I
      tripped. I had my hands in the straps of my hiking poles and I did a
      nasty face plant. No mirror. Blood spurting from my face, and the
      impact knocked the top off my water bottle and most of my remaining
      water spilled. I got upset. Then I managed to calm down. The fact
      is, I had already had a huge meal, and drank so many V-8s and other
      yummy drinks that I was well hydrated. Also, I had probably consumed
      a half a gallon of water that day. I treated my wounds, with iodine
      and anti-biotics, collected my wits, kept going down the trail, and
      within 10 minutes found a flat spot, well protected. I set up my
      Silshelter, and went to sleep. I really hate that dang Silshelter,
      but it did fine that night.

      The next morning, I found a stream very quickly, with a nearby fire
      ring. I built a fire, filled up on hot drinks, and ate breakfast.
      Then I heard hammering. I walked up the drainage about 100 yards and
      saw a cabin under construction. I really wanted to stay on the
      trail, but I was exhausted, tired of battling the cold in that
      inadequate bag, and concerned that my fatigue might lead to a more
      serious accident.

      I love being in the wilderness alone, but if you decide to do that
      you have to be EXTRA careful, and make some choices you might not
      make if you had someone who could look at your face and tell you how
      badly you were hurt, or snuggle you up at night. (None of the people
      to whom I have ever been married or dated or otherwise swapped spit
      with could keep up with me on the trail anyway, but why am I even
      talking about this here...)

      So, I got my ride to Neel's Gap from a very nice house builder who
      refused any money. I had the hostel to myself for two nights, then I
      came here to Atlanta, where I have friends. Ed, they sell your book
      at Neels's Gap, and I was so excited to be able to buy a copy! It
      was signed. I hope you don't mind that I used a pen and, above where
      you had signed your name, wrote: "To Marsanne, the Gorgeous,
      Intrepid, who has more sense than she looks like she has" so it
      looks like you wrote that.

      They also have your hammock, and I took it out and sang its praises
      to the sales guy.

      Here's the thing, folks: EVERY SINGLE potential issue I had out
      there, or would anticipate having on a thru hike, could be solved by
      the right hammock. I do love my HH, but I also, now, want a Speer,
      for winter camping. I was delighted to have the chance to meet Dave
      Womble at the SO RUCK, and he and I discussed hammocks, and agreed
      (Dave, correct me if I am misrepresenting what you said) that HH are
      better for warmer, buggy weather, (and for people who pee a lot at
      night. I said that part, not Dave) while the well insulated Speer is
      clearly the better option for winter.

      I also wish I had paid more attention to the numerous posts in
      various hiking forums that point out that down bags go bad after a
      few years, but this thing was ZERO rated to begin with, and a TNF on
      top of that. I talked to Brawny for a long time today and she said
      she had problems once with a TNF that is newer than mine.

      I have a lot of time off right now. My job just ended and I am
      setting up my own business after I get home. That's going pretty
      well already, by the way! The Arkansas mountains and Alabama's
      Sipsey Wilderness are within reasonable driving distance, so I have
      a chance to do some more hiking, soon.

      I am going to look for a discounted down bag on the websites, but I
      am also thinking of attempting a serious insulator for my HH. I do
      not have the patience, AT ALL to make a Speer right now. I do not
      sew, don't want to, has driven me crazy and led to a lot of cussing
      every time I have tried.

      I know this has been discussed here many times, but if anybody has a
      technique for an EASY to make insulator for a HH (not those foil
      things, something with down or fiber or something real), please let
      me know. But, this request was not really the point of my post. It
      was to let you know that I have had yet another experience that
      leads me to be even more excited about hammock camping than ever.
      Ed, your book ROCKS! I will be back over here sometime this spring,
      and maybe I can drive up and meet you.

      Marsanne
    • Ed Speer
      Sounds like quite an adventure Marsanne! Sorry I didn t make the SO RUCK this year, but glad you got a chance to meet Youngblood there (Dave)--he knows as
      Message 2 of 10 , Jan 26, 2004
      • 0 Attachment
        Sounds like quite an adventure Marsanne! Sorry I didn't make the SO RUCK
        this year, but glad you got a chance to meet Youngblood there (Dave)--he
        knows as much about hammock warmth as I do and I'm sure he can steer you
        right. I've been spending a lot of time myself at Neels Gap--Winton is
        helpig me market my hammocks and books, as well as a summer sleeping bag
        I've designed. Actually I'll be working for Winton at the Rainbow Springs
        Outpost this spring--giving hammock demos to AT hikers! We'll also be
        having a Hammock Hangers campout there in March or April--maybe you can make
        it then?

        Be sure and come for a visit Marsanne; you're welcome anytime--maybe I can
        convert you to my Speer hammock with PeaPod system! ...Ed

        Moderator, Hammock Camping-L
        http://groups.yahoo.com/group/hammockcamping





        > -----Original Message-----
        > From: canoetrip_2000 [mailto:firefly@...]
        > Sent: Monday, January 26, 2004 5:22 PM
        > To: hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com
        > Subject: [Hammock Camping] TripReport: AT, last week(LONG)
        >
        >
        >
        > First, let me say how glad I am I got off Friday instead of staying
        > up there for two weeks, like I had planned. I am in Atlanta, at the
        > home of friends, safe, warm, dry, rested.
        >
        > I started at Springer one week ago (MLK Day), but only managed to
        > put my, uh, dang Silshelter down in the parking lot at Springer and
        > bed down for the night.
        > I MISSED MY HAMMOCK THE ENTIRE TIME.
        >
        > But, after being at the Ruck in South CArolina over the weekend, I
        > became convinced it would be foolhardy to go out with it without the
        > proper insulation, which I do not now have. So, I begged one of the
        > Women Hikers to sell me her nice air mattress, and I let
        > them "Tuckerize" me (go through my pack and make me mad...) and got
        > a ride to Springer, but about 4 hours later than I had planned.
        > Packing, especially when scared to death, takes a L O N G time.
        >
        > It was supposed to get into the 20's. I have a TNF Zero Degree rated
        > down bag. It got down to about 10, and I was miserable that first
        > night. The bag has, clearly, lost lots of its loft, something
        > the 40- degree winter nights in Louisiana would not tell me...
        >
        > I started hiking Tuesday around noon, after spending the morning
        > melting ice and warming up. I love to hike in the cold...I made it
        > to a shelter...Gooch, I think, and slept like a baby.
        >
        > The weather was perfect, except I had an ongoing battle with the
        > cold at night, which exhausted me. Wednesday, I made it to Hawk Mtn,
        > another nice night.
        >
        > Then, Thursday, I saw a road, with people, and cars, and I had an
        > intense craving for V-8 juice and cookies. So I walked into Suches
        > and ate for about half an hour, had 3 V-8s, loaded up my pack with
        > goodies, looked in the mirror, washed my hands with soap and hot
        > running water, etc. A VERY cute young man gave me a ride to the
        > trailhead and I got water from the spring and went on. This was at
        > about 3 or 4. I forget.
        >
        > THIS WAS THE PART WHERE I WOULD HAVE JUST DONE ABOUT ANYTHING FOR A
        > WELL INSULATED HAMMOCK because I had a horrendous time finding a
        > place to camp that was not either windy or steep. I ended up putting
        > on my headlamp and doing something I never do, which is proceeding
        > down a trail at dusk, just looking for a flat camping spot. I
        > tripped. I had my hands in the straps of my hiking poles and I did a
        > nasty face plant. No mirror. Blood spurting from my face, and the
        > impact knocked the top off my water bottle and most of my remaining
        > water spilled. I got upset. Then I managed to calm down. The fact
        > is, I had already had a huge meal, and drank so many V-8s and other
        > yummy drinks that I was well hydrated. Also, I had probably consumed
        > a half a gallon of water that day. I treated my wounds, with iodine
        > and anti-biotics, collected my wits, kept going down the trail, and
        > within 10 minutes found a flat spot, well protected. I set up my
        > Silshelter, and went to sleep. I really hate that dang Silshelter,
        > but it did fine that night.
        >
        > The next morning, I found a stream very quickly, with a nearby fire
        > ring. I built a fire, filled up on hot drinks, and ate breakfast.
        > Then I heard hammering. I walked up the drainage about 100 yards and
        > saw a cabin under construction. I really wanted to stay on the
        > trail, but I was exhausted, tired of battling the cold in that
        > inadequate bag, and concerned that my fatigue might lead to a more
        > serious accident.
        >
        > I love being in the wilderness alone, but if you decide to do that
        > you have to be EXTRA careful, and make some choices you might not
        > make if you had someone who could look at your face and tell you how
        > badly you were hurt, or snuggle you up at night. (None of the people
        > to whom I have ever been married or dated or otherwise swapped spit
        > with could keep up with me on the trail anyway, but why am I even
        > talking about this here...)
        >
        > So, I got my ride to Neel's Gap from a very nice house builder who
        > refused any money. I had the hostel to myself for two nights, then I
        > came here to Atlanta, where I have friends. Ed, they sell your book
        > at Neels's Gap, and I was so excited to be able to buy a copy! It
        > was signed. I hope you don't mind that I used a pen and, above where
        > you had signed your name, wrote: "To Marsanne, the Gorgeous,
        > Intrepid, who has more sense than she looks like she has" so it
        > looks like you wrote that.
        >
        > They also have your hammock, and I took it out and sang its praises
        > to the sales guy.
        >
        > Here's the thing, folks: EVERY SINGLE potential issue I had out
        > there, or would anticipate having on a thru hike, could be solved by
        > the right hammock. I do love my HH, but I also, now, want a Speer,
        > for winter camping. I was delighted to have the chance to meet Dave
        > Womble at the SO RUCK, and he and I discussed hammocks, and agreed
        > (Dave, correct me if I am misrepresenting what you said) that HH are
        > better for warmer, buggy weather, (and for people who pee a lot at
        > night. I said that part, not Dave) while the well insulated Speer is
        > clearly the better option for winter.
        >
        > I also wish I had paid more attention to the numerous posts in
        > various hiking forums that point out that down bags go bad after a
        > few years, but this thing was ZERO rated to begin with, and a TNF on
        > top of that. I talked to Brawny for a long time today and she said
        > she had problems once with a TNF that is newer than mine.
        >
        > I have a lot of time off right now. My job just ended and I am
        > setting up my own business after I get home. That's going pretty
        > well already, by the way! The Arkansas mountains and Alabama's
        > Sipsey Wilderness are within reasonable driving distance, so I have
        > a chance to do some more hiking, soon.
        >
        > I am going to look for a discounted down bag on the websites, but I
        > am also thinking of attempting a serious insulator for my HH. I do
        > not have the patience, AT ALL to make a Speer right now. I do not
        > sew, don't want to, has driven me crazy and led to a lot of cussing
        > every time I have tried.
        >
        > I know this has been discussed here many times, but if anybody has a
        > technique for an EASY to make insulator for a HH (not those foil
        > things, something with down or fiber or something real), please let
        > me know. But, this request was not really the point of my post. It
        > was to let you know that I have had yet another experience that
        > leads me to be even more excited about hammock camping than ever.
        > Ed, your book ROCKS! I will be back over here sometime this spring,
        > and maybe I can drive up and meet you.
        >
        > Marsanne
        >
      • canoetrip_2000
        Ed, It s not about converting me...I m already a huge fan, of you, in particular. I think Speer Hammocks are great for certain uses and HH for others. It s
        Message 3 of 10 , Jan 26, 2004
        • 0 Attachment
          Ed,
          It's not about converting me...I'm already a huge fan, of you, in
          particular. I think Speer Hammocks are great for certain uses and HH
          for others. It's raining again here, so I took some time and looked
          at your website again. Great stuff there!
          Marsanne


          as well as a summer sleeping bag
          > I've designed. Actually I'll be working for Winton at the Rainbow
          Springs
          > Outpost this spring--giving hammock demos to AT hikers! We'll
          also be
          > having a Hammock Hangers campout there in March or April--maybe
          you can make
          > it then?
          >
          > Be sure and come for a visit Marsanne; you're welcome anytime--
          maybe I can
          > convert you to my Speer hammock with PeaPod system! ...Ed
          >
          > Moderator, Hammock Camping-L
          > http://groups.yahoo.com/group/hammockcamping
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          > > -----Original Message-----
          > > From: canoetrip_2000 [mailto:firefly@e...]
          > > Sent: Monday, January 26, 2004 5:22 PM
          > > To: hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com
          > > Subject: [Hammock Camping] TripReport: AT, last week(LONG)
          > >
          > >
          > >
          > > First, let me say how glad I am I got off Friday instead of
          staying
          > > up there for two weeks, like I had planned. I am in Atlanta, at
          the
          > > home of friends, safe, warm, dry, rested.
          > >
          > > I started at Springer one week ago (MLK Day), but only managed
          to
          > > put my, uh, dang Silshelter down in the parking lot at Springer
          and
          > > bed down for the night.
          > > I MISSED MY HAMMOCK THE ENTIRE TIME.
          > >
          > > But, after being at the Ruck in South CArolina over the weekend,
          I
          > > became convinced it would be foolhardy to go out with it without
          the
          > > proper insulation, which I do not now have. So, I begged one of
          the
          > > Women Hikers to sell me her nice air mattress, and I let
          > > them "Tuckerize" me (go through my pack and make me mad...) and
          got
          > > a ride to Springer, but about 4 hours later than I had planned.
          > > Packing, especially when scared to death, takes a L O N G time.
          > >
          > > It was supposed to get into the 20's. I have a TNF Zero Degree
          rated
          > > down bag. It got down to about 10, and I was miserable that
          first
          > > night. The bag has, clearly, lost lots of its loft, something
          > > the 40- degree winter nights in Louisiana would not tell me...
          > >
          > > I started hiking Tuesday around noon, after spending the morning
          > > melting ice and warming up. I love to hike in the cold...I made
          it
          > > to a shelter...Gooch, I think, and slept like a baby.
          > >
          > > The weather was perfect, except I had an ongoing battle with the
          > > cold at night, which exhausted me. Wednesday, I made it to Hawk
          Mtn,
          > > another nice night.
          > >
          > > Then, Thursday, I saw a road, with people, and cars, and I had
          an
          > > intense craving for V-8 juice and cookies. So I walked into
          Suches
          > > and ate for about half an hour, had 3 V-8s, loaded up my pack
          with
          > > goodies, looked in the mirror, washed my hands with soap and hot
          > > running water, etc. A VERY cute young man gave me a ride to the
          > > trailhead and I got water from the spring and went on. This was
          at
          > > about 3 or 4. I forget.
          > >
          > > THIS WAS THE PART WHERE I WOULD HAVE JUST DONE ABOUT ANYTHING
          FOR A
          > > WELL INSULATED HAMMOCK because I had a horrendous time finding
          a
          > > place to camp that was not either windy or steep. I ended up
          putting
          > > on my headlamp and doing something I never do, which is
          proceeding
          > > down a trail at dusk, just looking for a flat camping spot. I
          > > tripped. I had my hands in the straps of my hiking poles and I
          did a
          > > nasty face plant. No mirror. Blood spurting from my face, and
          the
          > > impact knocked the top off my water bottle and most of my
          remaining
          > > water spilled. I got upset. Then I managed to calm down. The
          fact
          > > is, I had already had a huge meal, and drank so many V-8s and
          other
          > > yummy drinks that I was well hydrated. Also, I had probably
          consumed
          > > a half a gallon of water that day. I treated my wounds, with
          iodine
          > > and anti-biotics, collected my wits, kept going down the trail,
          and
          > > within 10 minutes found a flat spot, well protected. I set up my
          > > Silshelter, and went to sleep. I really hate that dang
          Silshelter,
          > > but it did fine that night.
          > >
          > > The next morning, I found a stream very quickly, with a nearby
          fire
          > > ring. I built a fire, filled up on hot drinks, and ate
          breakfast.
          > > Then I heard hammering. I walked up the drainage about 100 yards
          and
          > > saw a cabin under construction. I really wanted to stay on the
          > > trail, but I was exhausted, tired of battling the cold in that
          > > inadequate bag, and concerned that my fatigue might lead to a
          more
          > > serious accident.
          > >
          > > I love being in the wilderness alone, but if you decide to do
          that
          > > you have to be EXTRA careful, and make some choices you might
          not
          > > make if you had someone who could look at your face and tell you
          how
          > > badly you were hurt, or snuggle you up at night. (None of the
          people
          > > to whom I have ever been married or dated or otherwise swapped
          spit
          > > with could keep up with me on the trail anyway, but why am I
          even
          > > talking about this here...)
          > >
          > > So, I got my ride to Neel's Gap from a very nice house builder
          who
          > > refused any money. I had the hostel to myself for two nights,
          then I
          > > came here to Atlanta, where I have friends. Ed, they sell your
          book
          > > at Neels's Gap, and I was so excited to be able to buy a copy!
          It
          > > was signed. I hope you don't mind that I used a pen and, above
          where
          > > you had signed your name, wrote: "To Marsanne, the Gorgeous,
          > > Intrepid, who has more sense than she looks like she has" so it
          > > looks like you wrote that.
          > >
          > > They also have your hammock, and I took it out and sang its
          praises
          > > to the sales guy.
          > >
          > > Here's the thing, folks: EVERY SINGLE potential issue I had out
          > > there, or would anticipate having on a thru hike, could be
          solved by
          > > the right hammock. I do love my HH, but I also, now, want a
          Speer,
          > > for winter camping. I was delighted to have the chance to meet
          Dave
          > > Womble at the SO RUCK, and he and I discussed hammocks, and
          agreed
          > > (Dave, correct me if I am misrepresenting what you said) that HH
          are
          > > better for warmer, buggy weather, (and for people who pee a lot
          at
          > > night. I said that part, not Dave) while the well insulated
          Speer is
          > > clearly the better option for winter.
          > >
          > > I also wish I had paid more attention to the numerous posts in
          > > various hiking forums that point out that down bags go bad after
          a
          > > few years, but this thing was ZERO rated to begin with, and a
          TNF on
          > > top of that. I talked to Brawny for a long time today and she
          said
          > > she had problems once with a TNF that is newer than mine.
          > >
          > > I have a lot of time off right now. My job just ended and I am
          > > setting up my own business after I get home. That's going pretty
          > > well already, by the way! The Arkansas mountains and Alabama's
          > > Sipsey Wilderness are within reasonable driving distance, so I
          have
          > > a chance to do some more hiking, soon.
          > >
          > > I am going to look for a discounted down bag on the websites,
          but I
          > > am also thinking of attempting a serious insulator for my HH. I
          do
          > > not have the patience, AT ALL to make a Speer right now. I do
          not
          > > sew, don't want to, has driven me crazy and led to a lot of
          cussing
          > > every time I have tried.
          > >
          > > I know this has been discussed here many times, but if anybody
          has a
          > > technique for an EASY to make insulator for a HH (not those foil
          > > things, something with down or fiber or something real), please
          let
          > > me know. But, this request was not really the point of my post.
          It
          > > was to let you know that I have had yet another experience that
          > > leads me to be even more excited about hammock camping than
          ever.
          > > Ed, your book ROCKS! I will be back over here sometime this
          spring,
          > > and maybe I can drive up and meet you.
          > >
          > > Marsanne
          > >
        • Mirage
          ... wrote: ... I ... cussing ... Making a speer really is alot easier than making under insulation for a HH, trust me, I m making my third
          Message 4 of 10 , Jan 26, 2004
          • 0 Attachment
            --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, "canoetrip_2000"
            <firefly@e...> wrote:
            ...
            > I am going to look for a discounted down bag on the websites, but
            I
            > am also thinking of attempting a serious insulator for my HH. I do
            > not have the patience, AT ALL to make a Speer right now. I do not
            > sew, don't want to, has driven me crazy and led to a lot of
            cussing
            > every time I have tried.
            >

            Making a speer really is alot easier than making under insulation
            for a HH, trust me, I'm making my third quilt, this one down (up to
            3am Sunday morning sewing...)

            A speer can even be made w/out hemming the edges if you want to be
            real lazy about it. Just take ~10 feet (read the book for details)
            of any nylon fabric of desired strenght/weight, tie the end knot and
            viola. No need for bug net in the winter, put a sleeping bag around
            it and a pad inside if really cold and you are done.

            > I know this has been discussed here many times, but if anybody has
            a
            > technique for an EASY to make insulator for a HH (not those foil
            > things, something with down or fiber or something real), please
            let
            > me know.

            If you are willing to use the HH w/out the side tie outs (I've not
            noticed any major performance differnce, just a closer fit, more
            like the speer, not as spacious, which you want to avoid anyway in
            the winter, too much to heat), use a pea pod or rectangular quilt
            and hang it underneath. Use shock cord at the foot end so you can
            push it aside to get in. Also, if you do not have tie-outs sewn
            into the quilt (as mine do, see the photos here or linked in my
            previous posts on this subject), use a small stone or "grip clips"
            and use more shock cord to cross over the ridgeline (on the outside)
            in an "X" pattern. This will keep this sides up. Gather up all the
            extra haning fabric at the head and foot and tie a bit of string
            around it to "close" the gap.

            It probably sounds crude and may be lost in translation, but it can
            work, I've done it with my HH.

            Shane "Mirage"...
          • Ed Speer
            Thanks Marsanne. We re getting some of that falling stuff here too-only it s snow and freezing rain! What a change this weekend--on Sat we were working in
            Message 5 of 10 , Jan 26, 2004
            • 0 Attachment
              Thanks Marsanne. We're getting some of that falling stuff here too-only
              it's snow and freezing rain! What a change this weekend--on Sat we were
              working in the yard in shirt sleeves in 65F, but 24 hrs later it snowed 4"
              and now we have 1" of ice on top of that! Sure was a short spring! I'm
              sure you are glad to be out of the high mtns--did you run into any of this
              nasty stuff? Anyway the weather's perfect for cold testing of the hammock,
              only I'm stuck in the office, again. That hammock stand set up in the back
              yard is calling me.......Ed

              Moderator, Hammock Camping-L
              http://groups.yahoo.com/group/hammockcamping




              > -----Original Message-----
              > From: canoetrip_2000 [mailto:firefly@...]
              > Sent: Monday, January 26, 2004 6:55 PM
              > To: hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com
              > Subject: Re: [Hammock Camping] TripReport: AT, last week(LONG)
              >
              >
              > Ed,
              > It's not about converting me...I'm already a huge fan, of you, in
              > particular. I think Speer Hammocks are great for certain uses and HH
              > for others. It's raining again here, so I took some time and looked
              > at your website again. Great stuff there!
              > Marsanne
            • Ron
              Ed if you need cold weather to test hammocks then come stay here in NH.The past 2 weeks have been record cold.I had my cases of coke and potatoes on the floor
              Message 6 of 10 , Jan 26, 2004
              • 0 Attachment
                Ed if you need cold weather to test hammocks then come stay here in NH.The past 2 weeks have been record cold.I had my cases of coke and potatoes on the floor in the corner and they froze.My hammock is hung about 2 feet from the stove and that is where it is staying til winter is over.All I do is put wood in the stove every couple of hours and cook.With wind chill it has been as low as -45 and most nites are -20 to -30 without the wind.How low will your pod go? Sorry to hear about your foul weather today....we should get it tomorrow nite and it is welcome.So long for now time to get back in my year old speer......toasty so close to the stove
                ----- Original Message -----
                From: Ed Speer
                Sent: Monday, January 26, 2004 8:14 PM
                Subject: RE: [Hammock Camping] TripReport: AT, last week(LONG)

                Thanks Marsanne.  We're getting some of that falling stuff here too-only
                it's snow and freezing rain!  What a change this weekend--on Sat we were
                working in the yard in shirt sleeves in 65F, but 24 hrs later it snowed 4"
                and now we have 1" of ice on top of that!  Sure was a short spring!  I'm
                sure you are glad to be out of the high mtns--did you run into any of this
                nasty stuff?  Anyway the weather's perfect for cold testing of the hammock,
                only I'm stuck in the office, again.  That hammock stand set up in the back
                yard is calling me.......Ed

                Moderator, Hammock Camping-L
                http://groups.yahoo.com/group/hammockcamping




                > -----Original Message-----
                > From: canoetrip_2000 [mailto:firefly@...]
                > Sent: Monday, January 26, 2004 6:55 PM
                > To: hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com
                > Subject: Re: [Hammock Camping] TripReport: AT, last week(LONG)
                >
                >
                > Ed,
                > It's not about converting me...I'm already a huge fan, of you, in
                > particular. I think Speer Hammocks are great for certain uses and HH
                > for others. It's raining again here, so I took some time and looked
                > at your website again. Great stuff there!
                > Marsanne



                Yahoo! Groups Links

              • Ed Speer
                Nothing down here to compete with those temps Mudman! Don t blame you for staying close to the stove. I guess this means your bathtub is also out of
                Message 7 of 10 , Jan 26, 2004
                • 0 Attachment
                  Message
                  Nothing down here to compete with those temps Mudman!  Don't blame you for staying close to the stove.  I guess this means your 'bathtub' is also out of service huh? I don't know how you can take all that cold.  Keep the hammock close to the stove and keep the stove full of wood--stay warm Mudman; spring's got to come sooner or later! 
                   
                  I saw Sheltowee and Waterfall back in Dec--they're doing fine.  Nina's in LA promotoing her new hiking book--evidently it's selling very well...Ed
                   
                  Moderator, Hammock Camping-L
                   
                • canoetrip_2000
                  ... I was wondering about just hanging a bag around it. I guess it would have to be a rectangular one? Or not? The Campmor and Sierra Trading Post websites
                  Message 8 of 10 , Jan 27, 2004
                  • 0 Attachment
                    >, put a sleeping bag around
                    > it and a pad inside if really cold and you are done.

                    I was wondering about just hanging a bag around it. I guess it would
                    have to be a rectangular one? Or not? The Campmor and Sierra Trading
                    Post websites have some rectangular bags. Then I could make a quilt
                    for the top. I am going back hiking in a few weeks, either Arkansas
                    or back here to GA, and want to be ready.


                    > If you are willing to use the HH w/out the side tie outs (I've not
                    > noticed any major performance differnce, just a closer fit, more
                    > like the speer, not as spacious, which you want to avoid anyway in
                    > the winter, too much to heat),

                    I never use the HH tie outs. I move around a lot, sleep on my side,
                    have torn the bug netting by flouncing around in there with the tie
                    outs.

                    use a pea pod or rectangular quilt
                    > and hang it underneath. Use shock cord at the foot end so you can
                    > push it aside to get in. Also, if you do not have tie-outs sewn
                    > into the quilt (as mine do, see the photos here or linked in my
                    > previous posts on this subject), use a small stone or "grip clips"
                    > and use more shock cord to cross over the ridgeline (on the
                    outside)
                    > in an "X" pattern. This will keep this sides up. Gather up all
                    the
                    > extra haning fabric at the head and foot and tie a bit of string
                    > around it to "close" the gap.

                    I took a good quality space blanket, not a flimsy foil thing, and
                    cut it to fit under my HH when I had it hanging in my parents back
                    yard over Thanksgiving. I get the idea. I need better shock cord,
                    and glove hooks, and I could make this work. My idea was to stick a
                    down quilt inside the space blanky, against the bottom of the
                    hammock. The space blanky already fits the bottom of the hammock. I
                    am waiting to find a down bag on sale CHEAP so I can mess with it.

                    Thanks, Shane!
                    Marsanne
                    > It probably sounds crude and may be lost in translation, but it
                    can
                    > work, I've done it with my HH.
                    >
                    > Shane "Mirage"...
                  • ra1@imrisk.com
                    ... I tried using a bag outside the hammock, with a piece of shock cord to hold the bottom of the bag shut against the bottom of the hammock. In 40 degree
                    Message 9 of 10 , Jan 27, 2004
                    • 0 Attachment
                      Quoting canoetrip_2000 <firefly@...>:

                      >
                      >
                      > >, put a sleeping bag around
                      > > it and a pad inside if really cold and you are done.
                      >
                      > I was wondering about just hanging a bag around it. I guess it would
                      > have to be a rectangular one? Or not? The Campmor and Sierra Trading
                      > Post websites have some rectangular bags. Then I could make a quilt
                      > for the top. I am going back hiking in a few weeks, either Arkansas
                      > or back here to GA, and want to be ready.
                      >
                      I tried using a bag outside the hammock, with a piece of shock cord to hold the
                      bottom of the bag shut against the bottom of the hammock. In 40 degree weather
                      I just about froze (I did not have a separate bag inside the hammock.)

                      I think this was because the bag was somewhat tight against the hammock and was
                      pulled "thin" with compression of the insulation.

                      I believe Ed's Pea Pod is a much better outside the hammock bag solution than
                      anything I have been able to rig with a standard sleeping bag.

                      But, experimenting can be fun!

                      Rick
                    • ra1@imrisk.com
                      I felt cold reading your report. I hate cold. I like to sleep warm. I was interested in your thoughts about the Speer Hammock being not as good for bugs or
                      Message 10 of 10 , Jan 27, 2004
                      • 0 Attachment
                        I felt cold reading your report. I hate cold. I like to sleep warm.

                        I was interested in your thoughts about the Speer Hammock being not as good for
                        bugs or going out for a potty break...

                        Having used both, I believe the Speer is only about 100 percent easier when it
                        comes to a late night potty dash. But this is something which you may need to
                        experience to get a feeling for.

                        I read Mirage's suggestion for building an easy version of the Speer. He is
                        absolutely correct. A trial version of the Speer can be built WITHOUT ANY
                        SEWING, in under 15 minutes, for about $15. I have been meaning to write a
                        little page on how to do so with pictures and WalMart stock numbers. Your story
                        reminded me of the need to do so.

                        Limitations of the 15/15 Hammock:

                        - Unknown how long the hammock edges will last without a straight hem to
                        reinforce them
                        - No bug protection (but I have posted a simple $5 solution for that as well)

                        I hope to get to the page this week.

                        Rick
                      Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.