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Re: rainfly hanging

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  • Dave Womble
    ... Patrick, Some backpacking hammock systems are designed to use the hammock straps for the rainfly attachment and some aren t. What kind of hammock are you
    Message 1 of 6 , Dec 22, 2003
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      --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, "mindrehab248"
      <mindrehab248@y...> wrote:
      > How do people hang their rainfly? Seems like it would be easiest to
      > attach it to the hanging straps from the hammock, but is there a
      > better way? Chet, I believe, mentioned that he has a ridgeline tied
      > just past both of the hammock knots in order to get the same setup
      > each time. Is the fly/tarp hung from that ridgeline? What type of
      > rope and what knot were used to tie the ridgeline? Thanks for the
      > help! Patrick

      Patrick,

      Some backpacking hammock systems are designed to use the hammock
      straps for the rainfly attachment and some aren't. What kind of
      hammock are you using?

      For instance, the Hennessy is designed to use the hammock straps
      while the Speer and Clark are not. I have found that the rainfly has
      better and more consistant tensioning if it is not attached to the
      hammock straps (at least not both ends). When you get in the hammock
      the hammock straps move around some and this changes the tensioning
      of the rainfly if it is attached to the hammock straps. However,
      with a smallish rainfly, you may end up with better rain protection
      if you attach the rainfly to the hammock straps because that
      configuration gets the rainfly as close as possible to the hammock.

      Youngblood
    • mindrehab248
      ... Speer hammock. ... I d be using the 8x10 rainfly. I was thinking that I could attach the head end of the fly to the hammock strap, then tie out the foot
      Message 2 of 6 , Dec 22, 2003
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        --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, "Dave Womble" <dpwomble@y...>
        >What kind of hammock are you using?

        Speer hammock.

        >However, with a smallish rainfly, you may end up with better rain
        >protection if you attach the rainfly to the hammock straps because
        >that configuration gets the rainfly as close as possible to the
        >hammock.

        I'd be using the 8x10 rainfly. I was thinking that I could attach the
        head end of the fly to the hammock strap, then tie out the foot ends
        of the fly to get ventilation and decrease the "coffin feel" of the
        completely and tightly covered hammock.
      • Dave Womble
        I am leaving in the morning for a backpacking trip so I don t know if I will see your answer before I leave. I don t quite understand how you are going to
        Message 3 of 6 , Dec 22, 2003
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          I am leaving in the morning for a backpacking trip so I don't know if
          I will see your answer before I leave. I don't quite understand how
          you are going to attach your rainfly. I haven't tried attaching a
          rectangular rainfly to the hammock straps, the Hennessy I have uses a
          diamond shape rainfly and the hammock has very restricted/limited
          swinging because it also utilizes side pullouts on the body of the
          hammock. I use a rectangular rainfly with my Speer. With the diamond
          shaped Hennessy fly there are four attachment points, two on the
          ridgeline and two on the sides. With a rectangular shape there are a
          minimum of six attachment points, two along the ridgeline and one on
          each of the four corners. Where are you thinking about attaching the
          four corners? If you attach the fly to the hammock strap and then
          attach its two adjacent corners to the ground, I thing you will be
          putting a lot of stress on these corner tie outs when the hammock
          tries to swing and I would worry that you might damage your fly.
          There is also a potential to damage your fly if you attach it to the
          ridgeline and the fly tries to act as a taut ridgeline. Be careful.
          I am very happy attaching my rectangular fly seperately from my Speer
          Hammock attachment straps. Like Rick said, it gives you more
          flexibility in the rain and I think all in all, it will be easier to
          keep the rain fly taut without damaging it. Let us know what you try
          and how it turns out. Good luck with it.

          Youngblood

          --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, "mindrehab248"
          <mindrehab248@y...> wrote:
          > --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, "Dave Womble"
          <dpwomble@y...>
          > >What kind of hammock are you using?
          >
          > Speer hammock.
          >
          > >However, with a smallish rainfly, you may end up with better rain
          > >protection if you attach the rainfly to the hammock straps because
          > >that configuration gets the rainfly as close as possible to the
          > >hammock.
          >
          > I'd be using the 8x10 rainfly. I was thinking that I could attach
          the
          > head end of the fly to the hammock strap, then tie out the foot
          ends
          > of the fly to get ventilation and decrease the "coffin feel" of the
          > completely and tightly covered hammock.
        • Chet Clocksin
          Patrick, I do have a ridgeline tied on my hammock, but I don t hang the fly from it. I typically tie the fly seperately to the same trees the hammock is tied
          Message 4 of 6 , Dec 22, 2003
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            Patrick, I do have a ridgeline tied on my hammock, but I don't hang the fly from it. I typically tie the fly seperately to the same trees the hammock is tied up to. Some hammocks, like the Hennessey hammocks, actually attach the fly to the hanging ropes via a prussik knot at each end of the fly, and you tension the fly by sliding the prussik knots apart to take up slack. I like tying my fly to the trees seperately because in fair weather you can tie it high enough to be able to stand under it, and it will still function well to keep you protected from the rain or the sun. If you encounter conditions with higher wind/rain, you can lower the fly for complete coverage. Ed covers this thoroughly in his book, along with lots of other great tips.
             
            Chet
            -----Original Message-----
            From: mindrehab248 [mailto:mindrehab248@...]
            Sent: Monday, December 22, 2003 10:34 AM
            To: hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com
            Subject: [Hammock Camping] rainfly hanging

            How do people hang their rainfly? Seems like it would be easiest to
            attach it to the hanging straps from the hammock, but is there a
            better way? Chet, I believe, mentioned that he has a ridgeline tied
            just past both of the hammock knots in order to get the same setup
            each time. Is the fly/tarp hung from that ridgeline? What type of
            rope and what knot were used to tie the ridgeline? Thanks for the
            help! Patrick




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