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Re: [Hammock Camping] Re: Repair kit

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  • navjohn@aol.com
    This thread of repair kits and replacement fabrics got me wondering about something: On the Spears hammock design, instead of looping the straps around the
    Message 1 of 6 , Dec 19, 2003
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      This thread of repair kits and replacement fabrics got me wondering about
      something: On the Spears' hammock design, instead of looping the straps around
      the knots and sewing the loops closed, why not sew a ladder lock buckle (or even
      a simple metal "D" ring) to one end of the strap and form the loop by passing
      the other end of the strap through the buckle? The advantage of this would
      be a "quick release" for changing either straps or fabrics -- should be good
      for experiments, or for carrying longer straps for big (or far apart) trees.
      The downside would be a couple of ounces more weight. My question is, would
      this system be as strong and secure as the conventional sewn loop?
    • ra1@imrisk.com
      Quoting navjohn@aol.com: why not sew a ladder lock buckle (or ... I have not seen a buckle or d ring I would trust with the several hundreds of pounds of pull.
      Message 2 of 6 , Dec 19, 2003
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        Quoting navjohn@...:

        why not sew a ladder lock buckle (or
        > even
        > a simple metal "D" ring) to one end of the strap and form the loop by passing
        >
        > the other end of the strap through the buckle?

        I have not seen a buckle or d ring I would trust with the several hundreds of
        pounds of pull. I have broken and bent too many similar devices. A climbing
        carabiner might work, but would be heavy and tend to get caught on the cloth.

        Someone (sorry I can't remember if it was bear or coy or another) mentioned
        tying a small looped bowline in the end of the rope or webbing and then bringing
        the standing portion of the support webbing through the loop, making a cinching
        knot. I think it would also be quite strong with most webbing to just tie a
        slip knot with a single overhand knot on the tail.

        However, I have always used the Speer bar tack method. When I have wanted to
        change out straps, I just slipped a knife in and cut the bar tack or untied the
        hammock knot.

        BTW, though Ed writes that the overhand knot can not be untied after spending a
        night in the hammock, I have always been able to untie it without damaging the
        cloth. It does take about 15 minutes, tired fingers, and real patience to
        finally untie it when it has been set for a long time. It has worked on
        ripstop, polyester, and even when there is bugnet in the knot.

        Risk
      • David Chinell
        Gang: I experimented with D-rings on my hanging straps, and they held just fine. These weren t any dainty bits of chromed pot metal, but almost 3/16-inch
        Message 3 of 6 , Dec 19, 2003
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          Gang:

          I experimented with D-rings on my hanging straps, and they
          held just fine. These weren't any dainty bits of chromed pot
          metal, but almost 3/16-inch diameter steel wire, welded
          shut.

          A single D-ring held my hammock rope when I tied it there,
          and a double D-ring holds my hammock rope when I use it like
          a belt buckle.

          To recap for newcomers: I ordered two tree straps from a
          commercial, custom strap maker. These are 1-inch polyester
          straps with a loop in one end that holds two D-rings.

          I hold the D-rings in place and wrap the strap around the
          tree using the Speer technique. Then I thread my hammock
          line through the D-rings, just like you'd do a belt
          buckle -- through both, over one, under the other.

          It's astonishing to me, but it does work, and makes it
          simple to adjust the tension or center the hammock.

          Bear
        • Mirage
          ... loop by passing ... hundreds of ... A climbing ... the cloth. ... mentioned ... then bringing ... making a cinching ... just tie a ... I ve been using a
          Message 4 of 6 , Dec 19, 2003
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            --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, ra1@i... wrote:
            > Quoting navjohn@a...:
            >
            > why not sew a ladder lock buckle (or
            > > even
            > > a simple metal "D" ring) to one end of the strap and form the
            loop by passing
            > >
            > > the other end of the strap through the buckle?
            >
            > I have not seen a buckle or d ring I would trust with the several
            hundreds of
            > pounds of pull. I have broken and bent too many similar devices.
            A climbing
            > carabiner might work, but would be heavy and tend to get caught on
            the cloth.
            >
            > Someone (sorry I can't remember if it was bear or coy or another)
            mentioned
            > tying a small looped bowline in the end of the rope or webbing and
            then bringing
            > the standing portion of the support webbing through the loop,
            making a cinching
            > knot. I think it would also be quite strong with most webbing to
            just tie a
            > slip knot with a single overhand knot on the tail.
            >

            I've been using a simple Prussik (sp?) knot with webbing or rope
            right below the hammock overhand knot.

            It holds and releases quite easily.

            There are two reasons not to use a knot:
            1) the knot is inherently "weaker" than a sewn loop.
            2) because the prussik, slip or bowline hitch are easy to remove,
            they may lossen or come off when breaking down or setting up the
            hammock. This is just a PITA (pain in the arse), especially with
            snakeskins.

            Otherwise, they are a great tool, especially during the
            experimentation and early assembly phases, or in those situations
            where a hammock needs to be made in the field (out of
            tarp/groundcloth/whatever).

            Shane "Mirage"...
          • mindrehab248
            ... Are these additional straps that you have sewn onto the original hanging straps, or did you replace the original straps with these new ones? Also, What
            Message 5 of 6 , Dec 19, 2003
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              --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, "David Chinell"
              <dchinell@m...> wrote:

              > To recap for newcomers: I ordered two tree straps from a
              > commercial, custom strap maker. These are 1-inch polyester
              > straps with a loop in one end that holds two D-rings.

              Are these additional straps that you have sewn onto the original
              hanging straps, or did you replace the original straps with these new
              ones? Also, What kind of hammock are they on? Thanks!
              Patrick
            • David Chinell
              Patrick: These are extra tree-hugger straps that I use to create an anchor point on the tree. I can tie either my HH ropes or my Tropical Hammock ropes to the
              Message 6 of 6 , Dec 19, 2003
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                Patrick:

                These are extra tree-hugger straps that I use to create an
                anchor point on the tree. I can tie either my HH ropes or my
                Tropical Hammock ropes to the D-rings.

                Bear

                -----Original Message-----
                From: mindrehab248 [mailto:mindrehab248@...]
                Sent: Friday, December 19, 2003 03:06 PM
                To: hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com
                Subject: [Hammock Camping] Re: removable hammock straps


                --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, "David Chinell"
                <dchinell@m...> wrote:

                > To recap for newcomers: I ordered two tree straps from a
                > commercial, custom strap maker. These are 1-inch polyester
                > straps with a loop in one end that holds two D-rings.

                Are these additional straps that you have sewn onto the
                original
                hanging straps, or did you replace the original straps with
                these new
                ones? Also, What kind of hammock are they on? Thanks!
                Patrick
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