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WindBumpers (long)

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  • ra1@imrisk.com
    WindBumpers - keeping my sides warm Latest in the stable of innovations from the Risky Dayton Hammock Shop! I have always had problems with cold knee and cold
    Message 1 of 43 , Dec 16, 2003
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      WindBumpers - keeping my sides warm

      Latest in the stable of innovations from the Risky Dayton Hammock Shop!

      I have always had problems with cold knee and cold shoulder in winter hammock
      camping. When I am on my back, I have to make sure my overlap pad is well up
      the sides of the hammock. When I turn on my side, my knee often pushes against
      my down quilt leaving no effective insulation between the knee and the hammock.

      The Garlington Insulator and the TravelPod allow me to put lots of insulation
      below the hammock, but they both lie right against the side of the hammock,
      giving no insulation there. Something had to be done.

      I first tried sewing a pocket in the side of the TravelPod to hold insulating
      clothing, like my Frogg Togg rain wear. Unfortunately, the pad of protection
      was far too likely to drag down the TravelPod, ending up too low and pulling too
      hard on the top of the travel pod, squishing the quilt over my chest and
      decreasing it's ability to keep me warm.

      Then the idea came to me to sew a tunnel like pocket along the long edges of the
      hammock. This pocket is filled from the ends with bulky insulation like the
      FroggToggs. It stands out from the surface of the hammock like a bumper. This
      does two things:

      - I now have insulation up at the top of the hammock on its sides. This is the
      hardest place to get insulation from a pad. It directly insulates my shoulders
      while sleeping on my back, and my knees and back when sleeping on my side.

      - Secondly, the bumper creates an an air space between the side of the hammock
      and the TravelPod (Or GI). The Travel Pod hangs from the WindBumper and does
      not touch the side of the hammock. This was one of the failings of the original
      designs when I tested them, and the WindBumper does an excellent job of creating
      the needed insulation space.

      To make a wind bumper on a 48 inch wide double bottom hammock, I:

      - cut two rectangles of 1.1oz ripstop 9 inches by 48 inches
      - hemmed the two pieces with half inch hems all around.
      - sewed one long edge of the rectangle along the center 48 inches of the long
      edge of the hammock on each side. The rectangle is sewed to the outer fabric
      shell of the double bottom.
      - measuring from the long edges of the hammock, the other long edge of the
      rectangles are sewn 6 inches from the edge and parallel to the long edge. The
      hemmed rectangle is about 8 inches wide, and the extra material makes a long
      pocket open at both ends. There is no stitching transverse to the hammock that
      could create a weak area across the major axis of pull.

      For use, I put my arm through the long tube and draw the pants of my FroggToggs
      through one tube. In a similar way, grasping the end of the collar of the
      FroggToggs jacket, I pull the jacket through the other tube. The FroggToggs
      do not compress much with the weight of the TravelPod. The tube could also be
      filled with other clothing, leaves, or paper.

      This is a simple addition to the hammock which adds a little less than an ounce
      to the weight. I have used this and find I sleep warmer and more comfortable
      with it in place.

      Modifications: For 60 inch wide hammocks, optimal placement of the WindBumper
      may not be along the edge, but instead, with the top of the bumper 6-8 inches
      from the edge of the hammock. The design is in its test period with a double
      bottom hammock. I believe the design is compatable with a single layer hammock
      as well, though Ed Speer has some doubts. Time and testing will resolve the
      question.

      I am beginning to consider a series of these tubes, like corrogated cardboard
      (baffeled tubes), all the way across the bottom of the hammock, into which can
      be inserted spare clothing or specially made down filled (or synthetic
      insulation) tubes. In such a configuration, the pad we put in a hammock may
      become unnecessary. In essence, it is a way to hang an underquilt, but allowing
      one to decide what goes in as insulation - anything from air to down to leaves.

      However, that is considerably more difficult. For the present, this easy
      modification of the WindBumper is something which I wanted to share. Perhaps
      someone else will find it useful this winter.

      Protect the ground...hang from trees.

      Risk
    • jeff jeffery
      hey guys, Checkout http://www.sailrite.com/ I was a cruising sailor and one thing we did was buy a sewing machine( from sailrite) it was used for mending
      Message 43 of 43 , Aug 4, 2006
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        hey guys, Checkout http://www.sailrite.com/ I was a cruising sailor and one thing we did was buy a sewing machine( from sailrite) it was used for mending clothes, making using items for the boat and gear and repairing our sails. We also purchased a book about sailing and sewing projects and ideas. It was easy to learn to use a sewing machine. Lots of good info on theor website too.
        Cheers. Art


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