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[Hammock Camping] Re: Hammock Camping Tarp Dimensions

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  • dpwomble@yahoo.com
    Chet, I haven t weighed it, but it is probably getting pretty heavy. I am using lots of stakes, pullouts, cord and velcro-- and they all add up. I am
    Message 1 of 22 , Dec 16, 2003
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      Chet,

      I haven't weighed it, but it is probably getting pretty heavy. I am
      using lots of stakes, pullouts, cord and velcro-- and they all add
      up. I am obviously trying to keep it light but I am concentrating
      mostly on what it takes to minimize the effects of wind. It is made
      from rip-stop nylon that I 'scored' from the dollar bin at Walmart.
      I coated it with silicon to water-proof it, as per Ed Speer's
      article, so it was pretty cheap to make. My rough guess is that the
      total weight increase over my 8x10 summer tarp will be about 8
      ounces, so it needs to do something to 'justify its added weight'.
      The verdict is still out on that. The white things in the photo
      along the opening are just tie-out attachments that I put on the tarp
      in case I want to open up just the bottom half of the ends of the
      tarp-- I think what I am talking about is shown in one of your
      photos. There is a fair amount of interior volume the way it is
      pitched (about 4 feet across at the side pull-outs), but the wide
      angle lense makes it look an order of magnitude more than it really
      is.

      Dave

      --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, "Chet Clocksin"
      <cclocksin@b...> wrote:
      > Dave,
      > The winter tarp set-up looks great. I especially like the side
      pulls you
      > added to increase interior room. I think I'll add some to mine. The
      velcro
      > ends look nice too. Is your tarp sil-nylon? What does it weigh? My
      tarp
      > shown in my folder in photo section is made of urethane coated
      nylon, cheap,
      > but too heavy. I will make my next one out of sil-nylon. Looking at
      you
      > interior photo with hammock hung under the tarp, it looks like
      you've got a
      > ton of room. One other thing, do you have buttons or hooks or
      something sewn
      > on the hammock near the vlecro strips? It looks like there is
      something
      > there in the photo, but I can't tell for sure. Nice job on the tarp!
      >
      > Chet
      > -----Original Message-----
      > From: Dave Womble [mailto:dpwomble@y...]
      > Sent: Monday, December 15, 2003 9:06 PM
      > To: hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com
      > Subject: [Hammock Camping] Re: Hammock Camping Tarp Dimensions
      >
      >
      > Chet,
      >
      > I have been playing around with the winter tarp idea. I decided
      to
      > use a 9'8"x9'8" tarp. As I tried it out at various time I have
      > continually made additions to block wind and keep the tarp off of
      me
      > when the wind deflects it. I have velcor to attach the ends
      > together, three mid-tarp pull-outs on each side and lots of
      stakes.
      > I posted some pictures of it when I had it hung pretty much all
      the
      > way to the ground in the Photos section under Youngblood's
      folder. I
      > found that when I hung it so that there was a 4 to 6 inch gap
      along
      > the bottom that although I would be blocked from direct winds, I
      > would still feel a cooling effect; this was significantly reduced
      > with the tarp going as close to the ground as I could get it. I
      have
      > the option of having high vents by simply unattaching the velcro
      > above the hammock ropes.
      >
      > Dave
      >
      > --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, "Chet Clocksin"
      > <cclocksin@b...> wrote:
      > > Dave,
      > > As far as ventillation, It might be a problem if you were in a
      > serious rain
      > > storm in warm weather, with it all closed up. But in mild
      temps, I
      > haven't
      > > had a problem. I really have not tried it in winter conditions,
      but
      > I'm sure
      > > I'll get my chance soon enough!
      > > I think 9 x 11 is pretty close to the ideal size tarp, because
      it
      > gives you
      > > the ability to pitch it either way (9 or 11 foot ridgeline). 10
      x
      > 10 seems
      > > like it would be good too, but with the 11 foot dimension, you
      can
      > really
      > > stake the sides all the way down. At first I didn't think
      pitching
      > it with
      > > the 9 foot ridgeline would work, but when the hammock is set up
      > withe proper
      > > amount of sag ( I use a ridgeline tied from just outside one
      > hammock knot to
      > > just outside the other, so it sets up the same every time) its
      > plenty long
      > > enough to cover the ends, and you have the added protection of
      the
      > long
      > > sides. I do think you have to tie the ends closed though if you
      > pitch it on
      > > the 9 foot ridge, if you are expecting rain. Having said all
      that, I
      > > normally pitch it with the 11 foot ridge, which gives a lot of
      > coverage over
      > > the ends, and still has pretty long sides. This size tarp will
      > definately
      > > keep you dry, but I don't know how well it would handle a really
      > stong wind.
      > > I suppose if you string it out tight using all the tie outs, it
      > would be
      > > fine.
      > >
      > > Chet
      > > -----Original Message-----
      > > From: Dave Womble [mailto:dpwomble@y...]
      > > Sent: Thursday, October 09, 2003 2:25 PM
      > > To: hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com
      > > Subject: Re: Hammock Camping Tarp Dimensions
      > >
      > >
      > > Thanks Chet, I have seen your photos, they're pretty neat. I
      use
      > a
      > > pitch similar to that to close off the end(s) of my
      hammock/tarp
      > > setup but my tarp is not wide enough to make it all that
      close to
      > the
      > > ground. I pull the ends out so that I don't have quite as
      wide
      > of a
      > > flat surface tucked under my hammock, worried a little about
      > > the 'wind sail' effect. Like you, I stake the center of the
      tarp
      > so
      > > I can have quick and easy flexibiliy to close off the ends of
      the
      > > tarp when necessary. When you have it pitched all the way to
      the
      > > ground are you still able to get enough ventilation? I was
      > guessing
      > > that I would want to come closer to the ground but not all
      the way
      > > down. What do you think would be optimal 'winter tarp'
      > dimensions?
      > >
      > > Dave
      > >
      > > --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, "Chet Clocksin"
      > > <cclocksin@b...> wrote:
      > > > I have been very happy with an 11 x 9 tarp. Believe it or
      not, I
      > > can pitch
      > > > using either dimension as the ridgeline. I usually pitch
      with
      > an 11
      > > foot
      > > > ridgeline, but have set it up using the 9 foot ridgeline,
      and
      > > staked the
      > > > sides all the way to the ground, and tied the ends together
      to
      > > create a
      > > > "tent" over my hammock for complete wind and rain
      protection.
      > You
      > > can see
      > > > photos of this set-up in the folder "Chets home made speer
      > hammock"
      > > the
      > > > picture is called "storm set up"
      > > >
      > > > Chet
      > > > -----Original Message-----
      > > > From: Dave Womble [mailto:dpwomble@y...]
      > > > Sent: Thursday, October 09, 2003 11:07 AM
      > > > To: hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com
      > > > Subject: Re: Hammock Camping Tarp Dimensions
      > > >
      > > >
      > > > --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, ra1@i... wrote:
      > > > I have not noticed any heat
      > > > > loss in the wind from the bottom of the hammock, except
      > when I
      > > have
      > > > not used a
      > > > > pad... like summer camping when the temps are in the 80s
      > when I
      > > go
      > > > to bed. Then
      > > > > every breeze feels like a nice cool caress. So we may
      be
      > > talking
      > > > about
      > > > > different things.
      > > > >
      > > >
      > > > What I have found is that the 'nice cool caress' in warm
      > > temperatures
      > > > turns into a 'blast of cold air' in cooler tempertures. I
      > also
      > > add
      > > > foam pads for insulation when the temperature drops. If
      > there is
      > > > wind added to the cooler temperature, don't you either
      have
      > to add
      > > > more insulation or get out of the wind? I am looking at
      > using a
      > > > wider tarp to get all of me out of the wind, not just the
      top
      > > part of
      > > > me. Don't know if that if the best strategy, but that is
      > what I
      > > am
      > > > looking at.
      > > >
      > > > I do try to hang my hammock where I can use natural
      features
      > to
      > > block
      > > > the wind, but sometimes the wind doesn't cooperate with
      me.
      > I had
      > > > that happen to me a couple of weeks ago when I camped
      about
      > 100
      > > yards
      > > > down the east slope of Blue Mountain in northeast Georgia.
      > The
      > > > prevailing winds where from the west when I selected my
      > site. I
      > > hung
      > > > my tarp with both halves of it folded over to the west
      side
      > so I
      > > > could see the stars and be in a position to enjoy the
      > sunrise. A
      > > > couple of hours after sundown a cool wind came from the
      > northeast.
      > > > It was not cold enough for this to be anything but an
      > inconvience
      > > > since I was using my 'winter pads and sleeping bag', but I
      > > decided to
      > > > get up and fully deploy the tarp. Well, this worked
      except I
      > > could
      > > > tell that my butt was cooler where the tarp did not fully
      > block it
      > > > from the wind. I got up, lower my tarp ridgeline as low
      as
      > > possible
      > > > and pulled the windward side of the tarp at a very sharp
      > angle to
      > > get
      > > > as much wind protection as possible. This blocked the
      wind
      > > > sufficiently but I was actually making some contact with
      the
      > tarp
      > > on
      > > > that side even when it wasn't wind blown unless I was
      careful
      > how
      > > I
      > > > positioned myself. I was at an even level of 'warmness'
      now
      > that
      > > I
      > > > had lowered that side of the tarp as long as I didn't make
      > contact
      > > > with the tarp. Later that night the wind died and then
      just
      > > before
      > > > daybreak in picked back up, but this time it was from the
      > west. I
      > > > really wanted to enjoy the sunrise from my hammock so I
      took
      > down
      > > the
      > > > tarp and had virtually no wind on me because I had the
      > mountain
      > > for a
      > > > natural windbreak. It wasn't cold enough this time for the
      > wind
      > > to be
      > > > anything but an inconvience, but if it was cold enough
      where
      > I was
      > > > pushing the limits of my 'winter pads and sleeping bag' I
      > think it
      > > > would have been a more serious problem. At some point I
      > think you
      > > > either have to block the wind with something, add even
      more
      > > > insulation or just pack up & move to stay out of trouble.
      > > >
      > > > So with this experience, I have started to rethink what I
      want
      > > from
      > > > my tarp. I feel confident about wind driven rain with
      what I
      > > have.
      > > > I use six stakes and I have tie-outs & velco on the edges
      > along
      > > the
      > > > width of the tarp so that I can handle wind coming from
      those
      > > > directions. However, I feel that I may be just a little
      > lacking
      > > when
      > > > pitching it for a wind break in cold weather. I think
      cold
      > wind
      > > can
      > > > still get to me where I extend beneath the tarp. So what
      I am
      > > > pursueing is what is an optimal tarp size to protect me
      from
      > rain
      > > AND
      > > > cold winds.
      > > >
      > > > Thanks,
      > > > Dave
      > > >
      > > >
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