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Coldus and Clark

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  • Dan
    Finally got a decent cold night to try out my Clark deluxe jungle hammock in cold weather mode. I used the breathable weather shields this time. I rarely use
    Message 1 of 7 , Dec 13, 2003
      Finally got a decent cold night to try out my Clark deluxe jungle
      hammock in cold weather mode. I used the breathable weather shields
      this time. I rarely use them but wanted to get as much potential
      warmth as possible. I zipped up the mosquito netting as well. I did
      not put anything other than shoes and pee bottle in the six pockets
      though and that would have provided additional insulation. In terms
      of strategy and equipment, I used my North Face Goliath (zero degree
      bag)with a silk liner, a 24 inch Coleman foam pad with another foam
      pad about 36 inches long across the top in a "T" shape to give
      hooulder coverage, and I wore my Recon-rap, a tube of special cloth
      that can be configured in a number of ways, for a head/nose warmer.
      I also hung a Krill light inside for illumination. Regarding the
      Krill light, I will henceforth use an LED headlamp as I got tired of
      the light rolling around at the most inopportune moments while
      maneuvering inside the sleeping bag. The silk liner was instrumental
      in keeping me warm as I decided to forego wearing any long underwear
      (boxers and T-shirt only--really didn't need the longjohns). Before I
      fell asleep, I found it necessary to remove my socks as well because
      my feet were too warm. I pulled the silk liner over my head and had
      that extra layer of warmth/filter to give me warmer air to breath. I
      noted when I got up that both the silk liner and Recon-rap had frost
      on them where my nose had been. By morning, the inside of the
      hammock was 38 degrees while outside temp was 17 degrees. I had a
      time getting into the sleeping bag and getting comfortable. Sleeping
      under the bag would have been easier but I doubt I could have stayed
      as warm. Being middle aged, I naturally had to pee numerous times
      and there was more consequent maneuvering which detracted from a
      super comfortable sleeping experience. All in all, I know I could
      sleep without too much discomfort in such weather but I will not go
      out of my way to do so. However, I do want to test out the Clark
      under a snow load so perhaps I will get a chance here in WV during
      the next few weeks. My $0.02 on using the Clark for cold weather
      hanging.
    • Dan
      Please amend hooulder coverage to shoulder coverage. Lazy fingers I guess.
      Message 2 of 7 , Dec 13, 2003
        Please amend "hooulder coverage" to "shoulder coverage." Lazy
        fingers I guess.
      • Coy
        Hay Dan What is special about the recon-rap, is it some kind of military Psolar Mask? Feet to Warm. Pure Heaven! Coy Boy PS I saw the movie Wrong Turn, been
        Message 3 of 7 , Dec 13, 2003
          Hay Dan

          What is special about the recon-rap, is it some kind of military
          Psolar Mask? Feet to Warm. Pure Heaven!

          Coy Boy
          PS I saw the movie Wrong Turn, been wanting to head out to WV ever
          since!

          --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, "Dan" <slipres@a...> wrote:
          > Finally got a decent cold night to try out my Clark deluxe jungle
          > hammock in cold weather mode. I used the breathable weather
          shields
          > this time. I rarely use them but wanted to get as much potential
          > warmth as possible. I zipped up the mosquito netting as well. I
          did
          > not put anything other than shoes and pee bottle in the six
          pockets
          > though and that would have provided additional insulation. In
          terms
          > of strategy and equipment, I used my North Face Goliath (zero
          degree
          > bag)with a silk liner, a 24 inch Coleman foam pad with another
          foam
          > pad about 36 inches long across the top in a "T" shape to give
          > hooulder coverage, and I wore my Recon-rap, a tube of special
          cloth
          > that can be configured in a number of ways, for a head/nose
          warmer.
          > I also hung a Krill light inside for illumination. Regarding the
          > Krill light, I will henceforth use an LED headlamp as I got tired
          of
          > the light rolling around at the most inopportune moments while
          > maneuvering inside the sleeping bag. The silk liner was
          instrumental
          > in keeping me warm as I decided to forego wearing any long
          underwear
          > (boxers and T-shirt only--really didn't need the longjohns).
          Before I
          > fell asleep, I found it necessary to remove my socks as well
          because
          > my feet were too warm. I pulled the silk liner over my head and
          had
          > that extra layer of warmth/filter to give me warmer air to
          breath. I
          > noted when I got up that both the silk liner and Recon-rap had
          frost
          > on them where my nose had been. By morning, the inside of the
          > hammock was 38 degrees while outside temp was 17 degrees. I had
          a
          > time getting into the sleeping bag and getting comfortable.
          Sleeping
          > under the bag would have been easier but I doubt I could have
          stayed
          > as warm. Being middle aged, I naturally had to pee numerous times
          > and there was more consequent maneuvering which detracted from a
          > super comfortable sleeping experience. All in all, I know I could
          > sleep without too much discomfort in such weather but I will not
          go
          > out of my way to do so. However, I do want to test out the Clark
          > under a snow load so perhaps I will get a chance here in WV during
          > the next few weeks. My $0.02 on using the Clark for cold weather
          > hanging.
        • Dan
          I didn t spell it right. Should be Recon Wrap. It s a tubular head garment made from some form of high tech polyester microfiber. It is multi-season and I
          Message 4 of 7 , Dec 13, 2003
            I didn't spell it right. Should be Recon Wrap. It's a tubular head
            garment made from some form of high tech polyester microfiber. It is
            multi-season and I use mine year round. The one I have is olive drab
            (I'm retired military and have an affinity for such) but they come in
            black (for the fashion-minded)and camo as well. The website where
            you can see one is www.specopsbrand.com. Just so happens I kept the
            container with instructions on the back so I can configure whatever.
            Advertised seven functions are: Sahara mode (my favorite), sweat
            band, helmet liner, boonie mode, neck gaiter, balaclava, and ops
            mode. I got mine at Ft. Belvoir military clothing sales at $18 which
            is a lot of money in my parsimonious mind but I believe it is worth
            it. Can't wait to hit the trails here in WV. Too much work this
            past summer and early fall and I don't even think about hiking during
            hunting season. Regards from WV.

            --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, "Coy" <starnescr@y...> wrote:
            > Hay Dan
            >
            > What is special about the recon-rap, is it some kind of military
            > Psolar Mask? Feet to Warm. Pure Heaven!
            >
            > Coy Boy
            > PS I saw the movie Wrong Turn, been wanting to head out to WV ever
            > since!
            >
          • Dave Womble
            Dan, Thanks for the report. I have questions about the pads you used. I believe Coleman sells three different 24 wide closed cell foam pads; one 3/8 thick
            Message 5 of 7 , Dec 15, 2003
              Dan,

              Thanks for the report. I have questions about the pads you used. I
              believe Coleman sells three different 24" wide closed cell foam pads;
              one 3/8" thick solid foam, one 5/8" thick solid foam and one 5/8"
              thick convoluted foam. Which one did you use? Also, can you tell us
              more about the other 36" pad that you used?

              Youngblood
            • Ed Speer
              Great report Dan--thanks...Ed ... From: Dan [mailto:slipres@aol.com] Sent: Saturday, December 13, 2003 8:48 AM To: hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com Subject:
              Message 6 of 7 , Dec 15, 2003
                Message
                Great report Dan--thanks...Ed
                 
                -----Original Message-----
                From: Dan [mailto:slipres@...]
                Sent: Saturday, December 13, 2003 8:48 AM
                To: hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com
                Subject: [Hammock Camping] Coldus and Clark

                Finally got a decent cold night to try out my Clark deluxe jungle
                hammock in cold weather mode.  I used the breathable weather shields
                this time.  I rarely use them but wanted to get as much potential
                warmth as possible.  I zipped up the mosquito netting as well.  I did
                not put anything other than shoes and pee bottle in the six pockets
                though and that would have provided additional insulation.  In terms
                of strategy and equipment, I used my North Face Goliath (zero degree
                bag)with a silk liner, a 24 inch Coleman foam pad with another foam
                pad about 36 inches long across the top in a "T" shape to give
                hooulder coverage, and I wore my Recon-rap, a tube of special cloth
                that can be configured in a number of ways, for a head/nose warmer. 
                I also hung a Krill light inside for illumination.  Regarding the
                Krill light, I will henceforth use an LED headlamp as I got tired of
                the light rolling around at the most inopportune moments while
                maneuvering inside the sleeping bag.  The silk liner was instrumental
                in keeping me warm as I decided to forego wearing any long underwear
                (boxers and T-shirt only--really didn't need the longjohns). Before I
                fell asleep, I found it necessary to remove my socks as well because
                my feet were too warm. I pulled the silk liner over my head and had
                that extra layer of warmth/filter to give me warmer air to breath.  I
                noted when I got up that both the silk liner and Recon-rap had frost
                on them where my nose had been.  By morning, the inside of the
                hammock was 38 degrees while outside temp was 17 degrees.   I had a
                time getting into the sleeping bag and getting comfortable.  Sleeping
                under the bag would have been easier but I doubt I could have stayed
                as warm.  Being middle aged, I naturally had to pee numerous times
                and there was more consequent maneuvering which detracted from a
                super comfortable sleeping experience.  All in all, I know I could
                sleep without too much discomfort in such weather but I will not go
                out of my way to do so.  However, I do want to test out the Clark
                under a snow load so perhaps I will get a chance here in WV during
                the next few weeks.  My $0.02 on using the Clark for cold weather
                hanging.



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              • Dan
                The Coleman was the 3/8 thick solid foam. The 36 inch was simply cut down from an old pad I had. I wanted to get some shoulder coverage so I laid out the
                Message 7 of 7 , Dec 15, 2003
                  The Coleman was the 3/8" thick solid foam. The 36 inch was simply
                  cut down from an old pad I had. I wanted to get some shoulder
                  coverage so I laid out the pads in a "T" shape. I use the same cut-
                  down pad to make one of my daypacks more rigid--a poor man's internal
                  frame pack, so to speak. When using the Coleman with thinner bags
                  such as a fleece bag, I find it causes my back to sweat which makes
                  for an initially shivery start to the morning if it's cold outside.
                  Did not have that problem with the Goliath.
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