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hung down hammock

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  • ra1@imrisk.com
    Its really fun when an idea crystalizes. I did a little thinking about this whole issue of staying warm. How can down be added to a hammock so it keeps the
    Message 1 of 6 , Dec 12, 2003
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      Its really fun when an idea crystalizes.

      I did a little thinking about this whole issue of staying warm.

      How can down be added to a hammock so it keeps the sleeper warm and without
      weakening the hammock along perforations. Added to those questions, I have been
      wondering what can be done to keep shoulders warm.

      Here is the idea: Cut a standard 1.9 oz ripstop Speer, except make it 48 inches
      wide. Sew 3 inch thick baffles parallel with the long edge of the hammock. I'd
      make the pad of down the full 48 inches wide and 48 inches long.

      With most of the sewing perforations parallel to the long edge of the hammock,
      there is little cause for the material to rip. I have not been able to
      eliminate two lines of stitching crossing the hammock and I do not know how much
      weakness this will cause. My calculations call for 8 oz 800+ down. The hammock
      will be usable year round and will not require a pad.

      I'm not personally interested in sacrificing the pad-I use it as part of my
      pack, but this may appeal to someone as a prototype. 8 oz of good down can be
      had for $50. Total cost is in the neighborhood of $80 for materials. The
      project should weigh about 24 oz complete with bug net and allow removal of 8 oz
      of pad from the pack. This is a savings of about 4 ounces from my present set
      up. It should pack to the size of 2 soft balls. Hammock tubes will have to be
      larger or may not be practical.

      Risk
    • mindrehab248
      ... make it 48 inches ... hammock. I d ... Because you are worried about the stress from the sewing holes from making the baffles, I assume you would be
      Message 2 of 6 , Dec 13, 2003
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        --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, ra1@i... wrote:

        > Here is the idea: Cut a standard 1.9 oz ripstop Speer, except
        make it 48 inches
        > wide. Sew 3 inch thick baffles parallel with the long edge of the
        hammock. I'd
        > make the pad of down the full 48 inches wide and 48 inches long.

        Because you are worried about the stress from the sewing holes from
        making the baffles, I assume you would be planning on sleeping on
        this 48" wide hammock. What if you had 2 hammocks, the one you sleep
        on and this down-filled one? Could you attach the down one to the
        regular hammock with a line of velcro sewn just below the velcro for
        the bug net (or even use the bug net's strip of velcro if you're not
        using the bug net)? Is that basically what the "taco" is?
        Patrick
      • Rick
        ... Yes, that would be similar to many of the underquilts devised. Instead, I am fascinated by adding down right against the skin at minimum weight. Rick
        Message 3 of 6 , Dec 13, 2003
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          mindrehab248 wrote:
          --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, ra1@i... wrote:
           
            
          Here is the idea:  Cut a standard 1.9 oz ripstop Speer, except 
              
          make it 48 inches
            
          wide.  Sew 3 inch thick baffles parallel with the long edge of the 
              
          hammock.  I'd
            
          make the pad of down the full 48 inches wide and 48 inches long.  
              
          Because you are worried about the stress from the sewing holes from 
          making the baffles, I assume you would be planning on sleeping on 
          this 48" wide hammock. What if you had 2 hammocks, the one you sleep 
          on and this down-filled one? 
            

          Yes, that would be similar to many of the underquilts devised. 

          Instead, I am fascinated by adding down right against the skin at minimum weight.

          Rick

        • Ed Speer
          Rick, I ve had bad luck with ANY stiching in the 1.9 oz/yd2 ripstop fabric. While failure is not immediate, it will happen after prolonged use--it s only a
          Message 4 of 6 , Dec 15, 2003
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            Rick, I've had bad luck with ANY stiching in the 1.9 oz/yd2 ripstop fabric.  While failure is not immediate, it will happen after prolonged use--it's only a question of time.  It's not the sewing thread that fails--it's the fabric itself where it has been perforated by the sewing needle!  A quilted hammock bottom like you suggest is possible, but I'd  suggest stronger fabric--perhaps 3.5 oz/yd2 or heavier...Ed
             
            -----Original Message-----
            From: ra1@... [mailto:ra1@...]
            Sent: Friday, December 12, 2003 3:02 PM
            To: hammock camping
            Subject: [Hammock Camping] hung down hammock

            Its really fun when an idea crystalizes.

            I did a little thinking about this whole issue of staying warm.

            How can down be added to a hammock so it keeps the sleeper warm and without
            weakening the hammock along perforations.  Added to those questions, I have been
            wondering what can be done to keep shoulders warm. 

            Here is the idea:  Cut a standard 1.9 oz ripstop Speer, except make it 48 inches
            wide.  Sew 3 inch thick baffles parallel with the long edge of the hammock.  I'd
            make the pad of down the full 48 inches wide and 48 inches long. 

            With most of the sewing perforations parallel to the long edge of the hammock,
            there is little cause for the material to rip.  I have not been able to
            eliminate two lines of stitching crossing the hammock and I do not know how much
            weakness this will cause.  My calculations call for 8 oz 800+ down. The hammock
            will be usable year round and will not require a pad.

            I'm not personally interested in sacrificing the pad-I use it as part of my
            pack, but this may appeal to someone as a prototype.   8 oz of good down can be
            had for $50.  Total cost is in the neighborhood of $80 for materials.  The
            project should weigh about 24 oz complete with bug net and allow removal of 8 oz
            of pad from the pack.  This is a savings of about 4 ounces from my present set
            up.  It should pack to the size of 2 soft balls.  Hammock tubes will have to be
            larger or may not be practical. 
              
            Risk


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          • ra1@imrisk.com
            ... Hi Ed, Good info. Have you had the stitching/cloth at the hems along the long edges fail? BTW, I have a new idea to solve an old problem which will debut
            Message 5 of 6 , Dec 15, 2003
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              Quoting Ed Speer <info@...>:

              > Rick, I've had bad luck with ANY stiching in the 1.9 oz/yd2 ripstop fabric.
              > While failure is not immediate, it will happen after prolonged use--it's
              > only a question of time. It's not the sewing thread that fails--it's the
              > fabric itself where it has been perforated by the sewing needle!

              Hi Ed,

              Good info. Have you had the stitching/cloth at the hems along the long edges fail?

              BTW, I have a new idea to solve an old problem which will debut in the next few
              days after I prototype it and take some pictures. This battle against the cold
              is good for the mind. It is amazing how much thinking one can do, laying in a
              hammock in the long nights of midwinter.

              Damn the torpedoes! Full speed ahead!

              Rick
            • Ed Speer
              Rick, I still remember your experience with ripped fabric on the hammock edge and I ve also seen it. I think the stresses on the edges of the hammock are
              Message 6 of 6 , Dec 15, 2003
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                Rick, I still remember your experience with ripped fabric on the hammock edge and I've also seen it.  I think the stresses on the edges of the hammock are greater than one would imagine.  Every time one gets into or out of the Speer hammock, there are great stresses applied to the hammock edges--this can cause failure at any weak point, such as needle holes in edge hems or stitches holding the Velcro strips.  damage is usually not immediate, but worsens over time until the point of failure is reached.  Constant viligance is called for. 
                 
                The recent posts suggesting adding the quilted insulation to the bottom fabric of a two-bottom hammock makes good sense....Ed
                 
                -----Original Message-----
                From: ra1@... [mailto:ra1@...]
                Sent: Monday, December 15, 2003 12:13 PM
                To: hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com
                Subject: RE: [Hammock Camping] hung down hammock

                Quoting Ed Speer <info@...>:

                > Rick, I've had bad luck with ANY stiching in the 1.9 oz/yd2 ripstop fabric.
                > While failure is not immediate, it will happen after prolonged use--it's
                > only a question of time.  It's not the sewing thread that fails--it's the
                > fabric itself where it has been perforated by the sewing needle! 

                Hi Ed,

                Good info.  Have you had the stitching/cloth at the hems along the long edges fail?

                BTW, I have a new idea to solve an old problem which will debut in the next few
                days after I prototype it and take some pictures.  This battle against the cold
                is good for the mind.  It is amazing how much thinking one can do, laying in a
                hammock in the long nights of midwinter. 

                Damn the torpedoes!  Full speed ahead!

                Rick


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