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Re: [Hammock Camping] Risk -- quarter weight questions

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  • Steve McBride
    Chet, I have made three of Risk s modified Speer-style hammocks. I had the same questions you have. Risk has answered them all quite well. I will add that the
    Message 1 of 5 , Nov 27, 2003
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      Chet,

      I have made three of Risk's modified Speer-style hammocks. I had the same
      questions you have. Risk has answered them all quite well. I will add that
      the quarters have worked fine for me. The sound of the netting brushing the
      hammock only bothered me the first time in a wind, then I got use to it.
      Also, the seal you achieve is remarkably good. I was really skeptical about
      it, but it works very well. I would also second his comments about the
      non-removable netting. It really does add warmth--considerably more than I
      would have guessed.

      My first hammock was two layers of 1.9 oz nylon. The second is a layer of
      1.9 and one of 1.1. The third is two layers of 1.1 oz. I use the latter
      myself, but I only weigh 145 pounds. When I constructed the hammocks, I cut
      the material with scissors, then sealed the raw edges with a hot (not red
      hot) knife blade. It worked well, but watch out because that thin nylon
      melts fast.

      The 5 x 10 tarp works great, but if I'm expecting prolonged rains, an 8 x 10
      is more flexible. I can do more under it, or gather a few people under with
      me. That said, I usually just use the 5 x 10.

      Finally, I don't sew the straps. They are tied on the knots with a noose
      made out of a bowline knot. That way if they are wet, they can easily be
      stored away from the hammock, and I have the option of cleaning them or the
      hammock separately. It has also allowed me to experiment with different
      straps (material and lengths). Currently I use 15 feet (each end) of 1"
      polypro strapping. Surprisingly, the straps don't come loose during packing
      once they have been tightened by the first use.

      Steve M
    • Chet Clocksin
      Steve, Thanks for the info. I m looking forward to this project. I m still a little confused about how to cut and attach the bugnet. I think Risk said to cut
      Message 2 of 5 , Nov 28, 2003
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        Steve,
         
        Thanks for the info. I'm looking forward to this project. I'm still a little confused about how to cut and attach the bugnet. I think Risk said to cut one long edge of the bugnet  football shaped, then pin that curved edge to the long straight edge(s) of the hammock body and sew that one edge together. Do I have that right? And you just sew the short ends together, and then a couple feet down from the ends on the long side that doesn't have the bugnet in it?
         
        I really like the sounds of having removeable hanging straps! Do you mean that you just tie a bowline in the end of the strap, make loop with it, and tighten it over the hammock knot?
         
        Thanks,
         
        Chet
        -----Original Message-----
        From: Steve McBride [mailto:drsm@...]
        Sent: Thursday, November 27, 2003 8:34 PM
        To: hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com
        Subject: Re: [Hammock Camping] Risk -- quarter weight questions

        Chet,

        I have made three of Risk's modified Speer-style hammocks. I had the same
        questions you have. Risk has answered them all quite well. I will add that
        the quarters have worked fine for me. The sound of the netting brushing the
        hammock only bothered me the first time in a wind, then I got use to it.
        Also, the seal you achieve is remarkably good. I was really skeptical about
        it, but it works very well. I would also second his comments about the
        non-removable netting. It really does add warmth--considerably more than I
        would have guessed.

        My first hammock was two layers of 1.9 oz nylon. The second is a layer of
        1.9 and one of 1.1. The third is two layers of 1.1 oz. I use the latter
        myself, but I only weigh 145 pounds. When I constructed the hammocks, I cut
        the material with scissors, then sealed the raw edges with a hot (not red
        hot) knife blade. It worked well, but watch out because that thin nylon
        melts fast.

        The 5 x 10 tarp works great, but if I'm expecting prolonged rains, an 8 x 10
        is more flexible. I can do more under it, or gather a few people under with
        me. That said, I usually just use the 5 x 10.

        Finally, I don't sew the straps. They are tied on the knots with a noose
        made out of a bowline knot. That way if they are wet, they can easily be
        stored away from the hammock, and I have the option of cleaning them or the
        hammock separately. It has also allowed me to experiment with different
        straps (material and lengths). Currently I use 15 feet (each end) of 1"
        polypro strapping. Surprisingly, the straps don't come loose during packing
        once they have been tightened by the first use.

        Steve M




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      • Rick
        A couple words from Risk on the subject: ... Yep. Pin the noseeum between two layers of cloth. If they have a right/wrong side, their wrong sides should be
        Message 3 of 5 , Nov 28, 2003
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          A couple words from Risk on the subject:

          Chet Clocksin wrote:
          Steve,
           
          Thanks for the info. I'm looking forward to this project. I'm still a little confused about how to cut and attach the bugnet. I think Risk said to cut one long edge of the bugnet  football shaped, then pin that curved edge to the long straight edge(s) of the hammock body and sew that one edge together. Do I have that right?

          Yep.  Pin the noseeum between two layers of cloth.  If they have a right/wrong side, their wrong sides should be out on the stack.  When I turn them over to hide the raw edges, the right sides are out. 
          And you just sew the short ends together, and then a couple feet down from the ends on the long side that doesn't have the bugnet in it?

          I do not sew the short edges together... no reason to do so.  I do *not* sew the bugnet to the end.  Its tension needs to be adjusted with the overhand knots to leave a nice tight ridge.  About three feet down each side of the two layers of hammock cloth is right.
           
          I really like the sounds of having removeable hanging straps! Do you mean that you just tie a bowline in the end of the strap, make loop with it, and tighten it over the hammock knot?

          OTOH, I could much more quickly just clip the bartacking with a knife than I could untie a bowline tied in webbing.  If I need to do a repair in the field, then a bowline seems like a nice way to do it; or even a simple slip knot. 
           
          Thanks,
           
          Chet

        • Chet Clocksin
          Risk, Thanks for the clarification. I ll let you know how it turns out. And BTW, Nice insulator! Iooks like a hammock Bivy to me. Now I ve already got
          Message 4 of 5 , Nov 28, 2003
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            Risk,
            Thanks for the clarification. I'll let you know how it turns out.
            And BTW, Nice insulator! Iooks like a "hammock Bivy" to me. Now I've already got another project to think about...I can't wait to hear more details.
             
            Chet
            -----Original Message-----
            From: Rick [mailto:ra1@...]
            Sent: Friday, November 28, 2003 3:33 PM
            To: hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com
            Subject: Re: [Hammock Camping] Risk -- quarter weight questions

            A couple words from Risk on the subject:

            Chet Clocksin wrote:
            Steve,
             
            Thanks for the info. I'm looking forward to this project. I'm still a little confused about how to cut and attach the bugnet. I think Risk said to cut one long edge of the bugnet  football shaped, then pin that curved edge to the long straight edge(s) of the hammock body and sew that one edge together. Do I have that right?

            Yep.  Pin the noseeum between two layers of cloth.  If they have a right/wrong side, their wrong sides should be out on the stack.  When I turn them over to hide the raw edges, the right sides are out. 
            And you just sew the short ends together, and then a couple feet down from the ends on the long side that doesn't have the bugnet in it?

            I do not sew the short edges together... no reason to do so.  I do *not* sew the bugnet to the end.  Its tension needs to be adjusted with the overhand knots to leave a nice tight ridge.  About three feet down each side of the two layers of hammock cloth is right.
             
            I really like the sounds of having removeable hanging straps! Do you mean that you just tie a bowline in the end of the strap, make loop with it, and tighten it over the hammock knot?

            OTOH, I could much more quickly just clip the bartacking with a knife than I could untie a bowline tied in webbing.  If I need to do a repair in the field, then a bowline seems like a nice way to do it; or even a simple slip knot. 
             
            Thanks,
             
            Chet



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          • Steve McBride
            Chet, Yes, the bowline loop itself is small, maybe only a couple inches in diameter. The long end is then threaded through that loop to form a sliding loop,
            Message 5 of 5 , Nov 30, 2003
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              Chet,
               
              Yes, the bowline loop itself is small, maybe only a couple inches in diameter. The long end is then threaded through that loop to form a sliding loop, which tightens over the hammock knot. I didn't use a simple slip knot for fear it would untie under tension.
              ----- Original Message -----
               
              I really like the sounds of having removeable hanging straps! Do you mean that you just tie a bowline in the end of the strap, make loop with it, and tighten it over the hammock knot?
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