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Best gear to stay warm?

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  • Ed Speer <info@speerhammocks.com>
    Everyone--What do you consider your best piece of gear for staying warm? A special foam pad?, your home-made under blanket?, a reflector layer?, etc. I d like
    Message 1 of 6 , Jan 29, 2003
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      Everyone--What do you consider your best piece of gear for staying
      warm? A special foam pad?, your home-made under blanket?, a
      reflector layer?, etc.

      I'd like to do some thinking outside the box here also. We all use
      sleep pads, under blankets, sleeping bags, etc, including clothes.
      How important are the clothes we wear inside the hammock? I've found
      that non-crushable clothing (pile, fleece) is extremely efficient--
      maybe even more thermally efficient vs weight/bulk than sleep pads or
      under blankets. The more I wear, the warmer I am. Has anyone else
      noticed this, or maybe tried bundling up in multiple thick layers of
      fleece? or wool? I'm wondering if tight-fitting insulation is not
      better than loose-fitting pads/blankets.

      Bear, does your sleep-pad shawl work because it is close to your skin
      and wraps tight around your body, like a shawl?

      Sleeping bag manufactures have slowly learned over many years that
      tight-fitting mummy type bags are warmer than loose-fitting
      rectangular bags, even if constructed with the same materials. I'm
      wondering if we might get better use of our insulation if it is tight
      against our bodies....Ed
    • David Chinell
      Dang. I m sorry but I seem to have confused EVERYONE with my terminology. Ed. the shawl isn t anything other than a piece of evazote pad (30 x 48 inches). I
      Message 2 of 6 , Jan 29, 2003
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        Dang. I'm sorry but I seem to have confused EVERYONE with my
        terminology. Ed. the "shawl" isn't anything other than a
        piece of evazote pad (30 x 48 inches). I call it that
        because I wrap it around my shoulders (like a shawl) just
        before I lie down in the hammock. But once it's down, it's
        just like any other piece of pad, lying there in the bottom.

        I think closed-cell foam pads are great, except for the
        width. Either too narrow, or so wide you ruin them by
        folding them to pack them around. I wish fleece was as good,
        but for some reason I don't think it packs small enough.
        Maybe because the pads get put outside my pack, but the
        fleece suit doesn't.

        I also like the notion of non-compressible fabrics, like
        fleece and wool. But their strength is their weakness.
        Hooray! They don't compress! Darn! They don't compress!
        Still, I'm going to try more experiments with a wool blanket
        pad to replace the foam pad. At least I COULD wear that
        around camp like a shawl. (But then of course, I should call
        it a pad, to sustain the confusion.)

        I've dreamed about wearing a wet suit jacket. My diving
        buddies tell me it's not a comfortable idea. Probably
        wouldn't pack well either.

        Maybe I just need about four chunks of 1 x 2 foot 1/2-inch
        evazote to position between me and the hammock as I roll
        around on cold nights.

        I've said this before and I'll say it again. I'd like to
        make a cloth cover that's like my Mountain Hardwear
        BackCounty, but has wings. that way I could fold the
        shoulder/torso wing parts and roll it all up neatly. Or even
        take the pads out and roll them flat. I'd make the cover
        accept one or two thicknesses of main pads, so I could
        tailor the pad thickness to the weather.

        Slickery on the bottom and grabby on the top. I don't know
        why, but it works, even in an HH.

        I also really do wonder about circulating the warm air that
        floats above my torso down to the bottom of my Pea Pod. Not
        quite the VW exchanger umbilical cord, but maybe an actual
        chunk of drier pipe with a battery powered fan. Well...
        maybe.

        And maybe dropping non-flammable skirts to the ground and
        putting a row of six votive candles under my hammock.

        I'm also thinking about taking a second look at ThermaRest
        pads. When I look at my winter pack, then (later) look at my
        hammock and bag and puffy clothes, it really hits home how
        much insulation is about volume. So adding the volume by
        inflating a pad seems good. I don't have to pack and haul
        the air.

        Maybe a sealed silnylon under-hammock that gets inflated
        after hanging?

        And about the under-hammock. The idea of making a simple one
        appeals to me, because I could stuff whatever I wanted
        between my butt and the under-hammock, but still be able to
        position it easily when I'm in the hammock. I think Ed does
        that with his Pea Pod some times.

        In this same vein, the Garling insulation system seems
        really promising, especially as it can work with simple and
        complex hammocks.

        In summary, the best I've actually found so far:

        HH - Mountain Hardwear BackCountry with quilt
        Simple - Speer Pea Pod plus various closed or combination
        pads

        Bear
      • Ed Speer
        WOW, you have several great ideas here Bear. I especially like the idea of candles beneath the hammock for heat--I know that this technique is used in cave
        Message 3 of 6 , Jan 29, 2003
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          Message
          WOW, you have several great ideas here Bear.  I especially like the idea of candles beneath the hammock for heat--I know that this technique is used in cave exploration where underground camping is necessary.  Cavers have been using hammocks sourrounded by a plastic drop cloth tube-tent with a single candle burning on the ground beneath the hammock for some time.  But a cave envirnoment is mild temps (55-75F) w/ no wind (or bugs); may not work as well outside.  BTW, I currently have a Speer Hammock on just such a caving expedition in India right now. 
           
          I've been wanting to experiemnt w/ fabric side panels from hammock to the ground, like skirting around a mobil home, but haven't gotten around to it yet.  This should work well--my pile of leaves under the hammock this Fall worked great!
           
          An inflatable hammock?  I've been thinking about this also.  I actually have a very expensive inflatable sleeping bag that I bought a few years ago for Arctic camping--It's like having a 4"-thick air mattress completely around the body.  Very warm--down to -40F!  The inflated tubes contain down, unlike the  heavy open-cell foam in ThermaRest pads, to prevent air currents.  The entire setup weighs 8 lbs (but it all serves as combo bivy, sleeping bag, sleep pad, and ground sheet).  It has given me some ideas.  I could probably make something similar w/ end straps for hanging like a hammock, but the weight would be too much for backpacking.  I've thought about making a hammock w/ a 4/5 length, inflatable down-filled bottom--would probably weigh only 2 lbs (not counting bug net and tarp).  It would be ideal for winter car camping, but not summer use.  A 1.5" snap-on removable 4/5 length inflatable down-filled under pad might just do the trick--but the labor involved would make it very expensive.  Still, I hope to try this this year.
           
          My observations on ThermARest type pads--the ultralight weight versions favored by backpackers produce cold spots because of the uneven pattern of foam inside.  However, the regular versions have solid open-cell foam inside, thus they weigh more, but are much warmer w/out cold spots (it's the old weight vs warmth problem).
           
          Dang. I'm sorry but I seem to have confused EVERYONE with my
          terminology. Ed. the "shawl" isn't anything other than a
          piece of evazote pad (30 x 48 inches). I call it that
          because I wrap it around my shoulders (like a shawl) just
          before I lie down in the hammock. But once it's down, it's
          just like any other piece of pad, lying there in the bottom.

          I think closed-cell foam pads are great, except for the
          width. Either too narrow, or so wide you ruin them by
          folding them to pack them around. I wish fleece was as good,
          but for some reason I don't think it packs small enough.
          Maybe because the pads get put outside my pack, but the
          fleece suit doesn't.

          I also like the notion of non-compressible fabrics, like
          fleece and wool. But their strength is their weakness.
          Hooray! They don't compress! Darn! They don't compress!
          Still, I'm going to try more experiments with a wool blanket
          pad to replace the foam pad. At least I COULD wear that
          around camp like a shawl. (But then of course, I should call
          it a pad, to sustain the confusion.)

          I've dreamed about wearing a wet suit jacket. My diving
          buddies tell me it's not a comfortable idea. Probably
          wouldn't pack well either.

          Maybe I just need about four chunks of 1 x 2 foot 1/2-inch
          evazote to position between me and the hammock as I roll
          around on cold nights.

          I've said this before and I'll say it again. I'd like to
          make a cloth cover that's like my Mountain Hardwear
          BackCounty, but has wings. that way I could fold the
          shoulder/torso wing parts and roll it all up neatly. Or even
          take the pads out and roll them flat. I'd make the cover
          accept one or two thicknesses of main pads, so I could
          tailor the pad thickness to the weather.

          Slickery on the bottom and grabby on the top. I don't know
          why, but it works, even in an HH.

          I also really do wonder about circulating the warm air that
          floats above my torso down to the bottom of my Pea Pod. Not
          quite the VW exchanger umbilical cord, but maybe an actual
          chunk of drier pipe with a battery powered fan. Well...
          maybe.

          And maybe dropping non-flammable skirts to the ground and
          putting a row of six votive candles under my hammock.

          I'm also thinking about taking a second look at ThermaRest
          pads. When I look at my winter pack, then (later) look at my
          hammock and bag and puffy clothes, it really hits home how
          much insulation is about volume. So adding the volume by
          inflating a pad seems good. I don't have to pack and haul
          the air.

          Maybe a sealed silnylon under-hammock that gets inflated
          after hanging?

          And about the under-hammock. The idea of making a simple one
          appeals to me, because I could stuff whatever I wanted
          between my butt and the under-hammock, but still be able to
          position it easily when I'm in the hammock. I think Ed does
          that with his Pea Pod some times.

          In this same vein, the Garling insulation system seems
          really promising, especially as it can work with simple and
          complex hammocks.

          In summary, the best I've actually found so far:

          HH - Mountain Hardwear BackCountry with quilt
          Simple - Speer Pea Pod plus various closed or combination
          pads

          Bear




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          hammockcamping-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com



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        • starnescr <starnescr@yahoo.com>
          Ed I saw that inflatable tent last year (someone posted a link on BPL I think). If I remember it was over $1000. If I were going to spend a lot of time in
          Message 4 of 6 , Jan 29, 2003
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            Ed

            I saw that inflatable tent last year (someone posted a link on BPL I
            think). If I remember it was over $1000. If I were going to spend a
            lot of time in severe cold I believe I'd go with it. I dont think
            there would be a lot of advantages to hanging it. But if you are
            interested in expeirmenting with something like this I would like to
            see a down air mattres built just for hammocks. You may have seen
            the D.A.M from warmlight.com. This may be the best solution plus it
            would work as a ground pad when needed. I would like to see a down
            air matress wider than normal but a sewn on top skinnier than
            normal. The bottem pad would take care of the bottom and sides and
            the top would just cover the top of chest/legs. I'll bet it would be
            expensive to make though.

            Coy Boy

            --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, "Ed Speer" <info@s...> wrote:
            > WOW, you have several great ideas here Bear. I especially like
            the idea
            > of candles beneath the hammock for heat--I know that this
            technique is
            > used in cave exploration where underground camping is necessary.
            Cavers
            > have been using hammocks sourrounded by a plastic drop cloth tube-
            tent
            > with a single candle burning on the ground beneath the hammock for
            some
            > time. But a cave envirnoment is mild temps (55-75F) w/ no wind (or
            > bugs); may not work as well outside. BTW, I currently have a Speer
            > Hammock on just such a caving expedition in India right now.
            >
            > I've been wanting to experiemnt w/ fabric side panels from hammock
            to
            > the ground, like skirting around a mobil home, but haven't gotten
            around
            > to it yet. This should work well--my pile of leaves under the
            hammock
            > this Fall worked great!
            >
            > An inflatable hammock? I've been thinking about this also. I
            actually
            > have a very expensive inflatable sleeping bag that I bought a few
            years
            > ago for Arctic camping--It's like having a 4"-thick air mattress
            > completely around the body. Very warm--down to -40F! The inflated
            > tubes contain down, unlike the heavy open-cell foam in ThermaRest
            pads,
            > to prevent air currents. The entire setup weighs 8 lbs (but it all
            > serves as combo bivy, sleeping bag, sleep pad, and ground sheet).
            It
            > has given me some ideas. I could probably make something similar
            w/ end
            > straps for hanging like a hammock, but the weight would be too
            much for
            > backpacking. I've thought about making a hammock w/ a 4/5 length,
            > inflatable down-filled bottom--would probably weigh only 2 lbs (not
            > counting bug net and tarp). It would be ideal for winter car
            camping,
            > but not summer use. A 1.5" snap-on removable 4/5 length inflatable
            > down-filled under pad might just do the trick--but the labor
            involved
            > would make it very expensive. Still, I hope to try this this year.
            >
            > My observations on ThermARest type pads--the ultralight weight
            versions
            > favored by backpackers produce cold spots because of the uneven
            pattern
            > of foam inside. However, the regular versions have solid open-
            cell foam
            > inside, thus they weigh more, but are much warmer w/out cold spots
            (it's
            > the old weight vs warmth problem).
            >
            >
            > Dang. I'm sorry but I seem to have confused EVERYONE with my
            > terminology. Ed. the "shawl" isn't anything other than a
            > piece of evazote pad (30 x 48 inches). I call it that
            > because I wrap it around my shoulders (like a shawl) just
            > before I lie down in the hammock. But once it's down, it's
            > just like any other piece of pad, lying there in the bottom.
            >
            > I think closed-cell foam pads are great, except for the
            > width. Either too narrow, or so wide you ruin them by
            > folding them to pack them around. I wish fleece was as good,
            > but for some reason I don't think it packs small enough.
            > Maybe because the pads get put outside my pack, but the
            > fleece suit doesn't.
            >
            > I also like the notion of non-compressible fabrics, like
            > fleece and wool. But their strength is their weakness.
            > Hooray! They don't compress! Darn! They don't compress!
            > Still, I'm going to try more experiments with a wool blanket
            > pad to replace the foam pad. At least I COULD wear that
            > around camp like a shawl. (But then of course, I should call
            > it a pad, to sustain the confusion.)
            >
            > I've dreamed about wearing a wet suit jacket. My diving
            > buddies tell me it's not a comfortable idea. Probably
            > wouldn't pack well either.
            >
            > Maybe I just need about four chunks of 1 x 2 foot 1/2-inch
            > evazote to position between me and the hammock as I roll
            > around on cold nights.
            >
            > I've said this before and I'll say it again. I'd like to
            > make a cloth cover that's like my Mountain Hardwear
            > BackCounty, but has wings. that way I could fold the
            > shoulder/torso wing parts and roll it all up neatly. Or even
            > take the pads out and roll them flat. I'd make the cover
            > accept one or two thicknesses of main pads, so I could
            > tailor the pad thickness to the weather.
            >
            > Slickery on the bottom and grabby on the top. I don't know
            > why, but it works, even in an HH.
            >
            > I also really do wonder about circulating the warm air that
            > floats above my torso down to the bottom of my Pea Pod. Not
            > quite the VW exchanger umbilical cord, but maybe an actual
            > chunk of drier pipe with a battery powered fan. Well...
            > maybe.
            >
            > And maybe dropping non-flammable skirts to the ground and
            > putting a row of six votive candles under my hammock.
            >
            > I'm also thinking about taking a second look at ThermaRest
            > pads. When I look at my winter pack, then (later) look at my
            > hammock and bag and puffy clothes, it really hits home how
            > much insulation is about volume. So adding the volume by
            > inflating a pad seems good. I don't have to pack and haul
            > the air.
            >
            > Maybe a sealed silnylon under-hammock that gets inflated
            > after hanging?
            >
            > And about the under-hammock. The idea of making a simple one
            > appeals to me, because I could stuff whatever I wanted
            > between my butt and the under-hammock, but still be able to
            > position it easily when I'm in the hammock. I think Ed does
            > that with his Pea Pod some times.
            >
            > In this same vein, the Garling insulation system seems
            > really promising, especially as it can work with simple and
            > complex hammocks.
            >
            > In summary, the best I've actually found so far:
            >
            > HH - Mountain Hardwear BackCountry with quilt
            > Simple - Speer Pea Pod plus various closed or combination
            > pads
            >
            > Bear
            >
            >
            >
            >
            > Yahoo! Groups Sponsor
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          • starnescr <starnescr@yahoo.com>
            Ed From your next post it is obvious you are familiar with warmlight. CB ... wrote: But if you are ... to
            Message 5 of 6 , Jan 29, 2003
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              Ed

              From your next post it is obvious you are familiar with warmlight.

              CB

              --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, "starnescr <starnescr@y...>"
              <starnescr@y...> wrote:
              But if you are
              > interested in expeirmenting with something like this I would like
              to
              > see a down air mattres built just for hammocks. You may have seen
              > the D.A.M from warmlight.com.
            • Ed Speer
              Coy Boy, that inflatable sleeping bag is called the Cocoon and it did cost about $1000--the most expensive piece of outdoor gear I ever owned. But I hate the
              Message 6 of 6 , Jan 30, 2003
              • 0 Attachment
                Message
                Coy Boy, that inflatable sleeping bag is called the Cocoon and it did cost about $1000--the most expensive piece of outdoor gear I ever owned.  But I hate the cold and I was working near the Arctic Circle in the winter time!  Actually it was for emergencies and was a business expense!
                 
                The DAM is similar construction--both are custom-made from readily available materials and I'm thinking of adapting something similar for use as an under blanket for the hammock....Ed
                Ed

                I saw that inflatable tent last year (someone posted a link on BPL I
                think). If I remember it was over $1000.  If I were going to spend a
                lot of time in severe cold I believe I'd go with it.  I dont think
                there would be a lot of advantages to hanging it. But if you are
                interested in expeirmenting with something like this I would like to
                see a down air mattres built just for hammocks. You may have seen
                the D.A.M from warmlight.com. This may be the best solution plus it
                would work as a ground pad when needed. I would like to see a down
                air matress wider than normal but a sewn on top skinnier than
                normal.  The bottem pad would take care of the bottom and sides and
                the top would just cover the top of chest/legs. I'll bet it would be
                expensive to make though.

                Coy Boy

                --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, "Ed Speer" <info@s...> wrote:
                > WOW, you have several great ideas here Bear.  I especially like
                the idea
                > of candles beneath the hammock for heat--I know that this
                technique is
                > used in cave exploration where underground camping is necessary. 
                Cavers
                > have been using hammocks sourrounded by a plastic drop cloth tube-
                tent
                > with a single candle burning on the ground beneath the hammock for
                some
                > time.  But a cave envirnoment is mild temps (55-75F) w/ no wind (or
                > bugs); may not work as well outside.  BTW, I currently have a Speer
                > Hammock on just such a caving expedition in India right now. 

                > I've been wanting to experiemnt w/ fabric side panels from hammock
                to
                > the ground, like skirting around a mobil home, but haven't gotten
                around
                > to it yet.  This should work well--my pile of leaves under the
                hammock
                > this Fall worked great!

                > An inflatable hammock?  I've been thinking about this also.  I
                actually
                > have a very expensive inflatable sleeping bag that I bought a few
                years
                > ago for Arctic camping--It's like having a 4"-thick air mattress
                > completely around the body.  Very warm--down to -40F!  The inflated
                > tubes contain down, unlike the  heavy open-cell foam in ThermaRest
                pads,
                > to prevent air currents.  The entire setup weighs 8 lbs (but it all
                > serves as combo bivy, sleeping bag, sleep pad, and ground sheet). 
                It
                > has given me some ideas.  I could probably make something similar
                w/ end
                > straps for hanging like a hammock, but the weight would be too
                much for
                > backpacking.  I've thought about making a hammock w/ a 4/5 length,
                > inflatable down-filled bottom--would probably weigh only 2 lbs (not
                > counting bug net and tarp).  It would be ideal for winter car
                camping,
                > but not summer use.  A 1.5" snap-on removable 4/5 length inflatable
                > down-filled under pad might just do the trick--but the labor
                involved
                > would make it very expensive.  Still, I hope to try this this year.

                > My observations on ThermARest type pads--the ultralight weight
                versions
                > favored by backpackers produce cold spots because of the uneven
                pattern
                > of foam inside.  However, the regular versions have solid open-
                cell foam
                > inside, thus they weigh more, but are much warmer w/out cold spots
                (it's
                > the old weight vs warmth problem).

                >
                > Dang. I'm sorry but I seem to have confused EVERYONE with my
                > terminology. Ed. the "shawl" isn't anything other than a
                > piece of evazote pad (30 x 48 inches). I call it that
                > because I wrap it around my shoulders (like a shawl) just
                > before I lie down in the hammock. But once it's down, it's
                > just like any other piece of pad, lying there in the bottom.
                >
                > I think closed-cell foam pads are great, except for the
                > width. Either too narrow, or so wide you ruin them by
                > folding them to pack them around. I wish fleece was as good,
                > but for some reason I don't think it packs small enough.
                > Maybe because the pads get put outside my pack, but the
                > fleece suit doesn't.
                >
                > I also like the notion of non-compressible fabrics, like
                > fleece and wool. But their strength is their weakness.
                > Hooray! They don't compress! Darn! They don't compress!
                > Still, I'm going to try more experiments with a wool blanket
                > pad to replace the foam pad. At least I COULD wear that
                > around camp like a shawl. (But then of course, I should call
                > it a pad, to sustain the confusion.)
                >
                > I've dreamed about wearing a wet suit jacket. My diving
                > buddies tell me it's not a comfortable idea. Probably
                > wouldn't pack well either.
                >
                > Maybe I just need about four chunks of 1 x 2 foot 1/2-inch
                > evazote to position between me and the hammock as I roll
                > around on cold nights.
                >
                > I've said this before and I'll say it again. I'd like to
                > make a cloth cover that's like my Mountain Hardwear
                > BackCounty, but has wings. that way I could fold the
                > shoulder/torso wing parts and roll it all up neatly. Or even
                > take the pads out and roll them flat. I'd make the cover
                > accept one or two thicknesses of main pads, so I could
                > tailor the pad thickness to the weather.
                >
                > Slickery on the bottom and grabby on the top. I don't know
                > why, but it works, even in an HH.
                >
                > I also really do wonder about circulating the warm air that
                > floats above my torso down to the bottom of my Pea Pod. Not
                > quite the VW exchanger umbilical cord, but maybe an actual
                > chunk of drier pipe with a battery powered fan. Well...
                > maybe.
                >
                > And maybe dropping non-flammable skirts to the ground and
                > putting a row of six votive candles under my hammock.
                >
                > I'm also thinking about taking a second look at ThermaRest
                > pads. When I look at my winter pack, then (later) look at my
                > hammock and bag and puffy clothes, it really hits home how
                > much insulation is about volume. So adding the volume by
                > inflating a pad seems good. I don't have to pack and haul
                > the air.
                >
                > Maybe a sealed silnylon under-hammock that gets inflated
                > after hanging?
                >
                > And about the under-hammock. The idea of making a simple one
                > appeals to me, because I could stuff whatever I wanted
                > between my butt and the under-hammock, but still be able to
                > position it easily when I'm in the hammock. I think Ed does
                > that with his Pea Pod some times.
                >
                > In this same vein, the Garling insulation system seems
                > really promising, especially as it can work with simple and
                > complex hammocks.
                >
                > In summary, the best I've actually found so far:
                >
                > HH - Mountain Hardwear BackCountry with quilt
                > Simple - Speer Pea Pod plus various closed or combination
                > pads
                >
                > Bear
                >
                >
                >
                >
                > Yahoo! Groups Sponsor     
                >
                > ADVERTISEMENT

                >
                <http://rd.yahoo.com/M=241773.2861420.4212388.2848452/D=egroupweb/S=1
                705
                >
                065843:HM/A=1394045/R=0/*http://www.hgtv.com/hgtv/pac_ctnt/text/0,,HG
                TV_
                > 3936_5802,FF.html> HGTV Dream Home Giveaway     

                > <http://us.adserver.yahoo.com/l?
                M=241773.2861420.4212388.2848452/D=egrou
                > pmail/S=:HM/A=1394045/rand=600146333>      
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