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RE: Hammock Camping Clothing or bag/quilt

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  • firefly
    Hello, Alastair, I am delighted to know we have at least one Brit in the group. I know about the English weather. I was there for 2 weeks in June, 2002,
    Message 1 of 6 , Nov 5 5:23 AM
      Hello, Alastair, I am delighted to know we have at least one "Brit" in the
      group. I know about the English weather. I was there for 2 weeks in June,
      2002, around the time of the main Jubilee celebrations. I was in London for
      a week and then went up and attempted Scafell Pike. Approximately 300 feet
      from the top, I was driven away by horizontal sleet. I was soaked through my
      old Helly rain jacket, to the bone. Was worth it, though. I LOVE England,
      have distant relatives there, am going back in 2005. I didn't see many
      places to hang hammocks up in the fells (that's "hills" to us) but I am sure
      there are many places elsewhere.
      Marsanne


      All this talk of staying warm - in the UK the main prob is staying dry!
    • Ed Speer
      Your point is very well taken Alastair--it just makes good sense to use your day clothes for warmth in the hammock at night and/or use your night insulation
      Message 2 of 6 , Nov 5 6:04 AM
        Message
        Your point is very well taken Alastair--it just makes good sense to use your day clothes for warmth in the hammock at night and/or use your night insulation for warmth during the day.  Hope you've checked out my PeaPod, which I designed as an effective sleeping-bag like insulation that goes completely around the occupied hammock for night time warmth and it also easily coverts to a warm robe for day-time camp duties like cooking dinner.  Thus there's no need to carry extra camp clothes. 
         
        I normally don't 'peddle' my PeaPod on this list, but your post was very timely and I know many folks are trying to devise the best stay-warm system for hammocks as winter approaches.  When everything is considered--warmth, insulation, condensation, bulk & weight--I've yet to see anything that works as well as the PeaPod--I actually use mine for everything less than 75F!  The PeaPod can be seen at:  http://www.speerhammocks.com   Also the upcoming Dec issue of Hammock Camping News will have a feature article on the PeaPod.
         
        While I've never hiked in England, I'd sure like to.  I visited the Lake Country many years ago and still dream about walking across those hills.  Thanks for your input...Ed
         
        -----Original Message-----
        From: Alastair Dent [mailto:alastair.dent@...]
        Sent: Wednesday, November 05, 2003 6:00 AM
        To: hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com
        Subject: Hammock Camping Clothing or bag/quilt

        All this talk of staying warm - in the UK the main prob is staying dry!

        Anyway, something that always bugs me about hiking camping (vs car camping), is the staying warm in the evening thing.  I have to have enough warm clothing to keep me warm while cooking dinner etc - and then I take some of it *off* to climb in my warm sleeping bag.

        So now I've started using a thin, lightish buffalo pertex n' pile bag, and wearing my 'evening' clothing inside it.  The bag is a summerweight - and I've been fine camping on the ground down to the mid 20s.

        So this makes me think that carrying a lot of insulation just for sleeping is plain daft.  I know a lot of pack weenies advocate down vests and hoods - so why not the same when hammock camping?


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      • ra1@imrisk.com
        Quoting Ed Speer : Hope you ve checked out my PeaPod, ... Ed, I have been meaning to ask this for some time. Have you considered
        Message 3 of 6 , Nov 5 6:10 AM
          Quoting Ed Speer <info@...>:

          Hope you've checked out my PeaPod,
          > which I designed as an effective sleeping-bag like insulation that goes
          > completely around the occupied hammock for night time warmth and it also
          > easily coverts to a warm robe for day-time camp duties like cooking dinner.
          > Thus there's no need to carry extra camp clothes.
          >
          Ed,

          I have been meaning to ask this for some time. Have you considered adding a
          couple slits that would work for arm holes? I am not sure if they would just
          lie shut when the PeaPod is around the hammock or if they would need a button or
          velcro. It seems this would add to the functionality of using the robe. After
          one finishes using the hands, they could be withdrawn back inside the peapod.

          Rick
        • Ed Speer
          Rick, I know some other robe-sleeping bags have arm holes, but I find they aren t necessary on the PeaPod--it s very easy to stick one s hand or arms out the
          Message 4 of 6 , Nov 5 6:42 AM
            Message
            Rick, I know some other robe-sleeping bags have arm holes, but I find they aren't necessary on the PeaPod--it's very easy to stick one's hand or arms out the front opening without the robe falling off.  Arm openings would need some sort of closure, thus greatly complicating the design, adding unnecessary costs--its amazing how complex zippers can be to production.  I say zippers, since Velcro would be inappropriate for any arm openings--Velcro sticks badly to clothes like fleece or wicking longjohns and thus limits the ability to extend one's arms thru the small openings (I've tried!).  Button closures work better than Velcro, but they are a hassel to open and close.  I find arm openings are too complicated and just aren't necessay in the first place.  Thanks for asking....Ed
             
            -----Original Message-----
            From: ra1@... [mailto:ra1@...]
            Sent: Wednesday, November 05, 2003 9:11 AM
            To: hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com
            Subject: RE: Hammock Camping Clothing or bag/quilt
            Quoting Ed Speer <info@...>:

              Hope you've checked out my PeaPod,
            > which I designed as an effective sleeping-bag like insulation that goes
            > completely around the occupied hammock for night time warmth and it also
            > easily coverts to a warm robe for day-time camp duties like cooking dinner.
            > Thus there's no need to carry extra camp clothes. 

            Ed,

            I have been meaning to ask this for some time.  Have you considered adding a
            couple slits that would work for arm holes?  I am not sure if they would just
            lie shut when the PeaPod is around the hammock or if they would need a button or
            velcro. It seems this would add to the functionality of using the robe.  After
            one  finishes using the hands, they could be withdrawn back inside the peapod.  

            Rick


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          • alidisaster
            That s the *good* time of year to go walking in the Lakes! It is amazing how cold you can get in wet, sleety conditions - I ve been in Vermont in Feb and it
            Message 5 of 6 , Nov 6 6:55 AM
              That's the *good* time of year to go walking in the Lakes!

              It is amazing how cold you can get in wet, sleety conditions - I've
              been in Vermont in Feb and it wasn't anywhere near as bad as the
              Lakes in autumn. There is a reason why Goretex was invented here -
              because we needed it! Along with the Pertex/pile idea.

              There are usually places to hang, just off the top of the fells. Lots
              of pine plantations, little groups of trees just off the tops. Can
              be difficult sometimes, tho. I'd love to make a hammock that could
              be rigged as a tarp+integrated bivi for the times when there aren't
              any trees about.

              Don't get much camping done atm; too busy stocking up wood, looking
              after kids, doing jobs on my boat. I do have an idea for rigging a
              hammock on the roof, tho . . .

              --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, "firefly" <firefly@e...> wrote:
              > Hello, Alastair, I am delighted to know we have at least one "Brit"
              in the
              > group. I know about the English weather. I was there for 2 weeks in
              June,
              > 2002, around the time of the main Jubilee celebrations. I was in
              London for
              > a week and then went up and attempted Scafell Pike. Approximately
              300 feet
              > from the top, I was driven away by horizontal sleet. I was soaked
              through my
              > old Helly rain jacket, to the bone. Was worth it, though. I LOVE
              England,
              > have distant relatives there, am going back in 2005. I didn't see
              many
              > places to hang hammocks up in the fells (that's "hills" to us) but
              I am sure
              > there are many places elsewhere.
              > Marsanne
              >
              >
              > All this talk of staying warm - in the UK the main prob is staying
              dry!
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