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Re: Hammock Camping baby hammocks

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  • ciyd01
    There s no way to accurately describe what I saw, but the design was such that the hammock could not be twisted around itself, even empty. All four corners
    Message 1 of 2 , Sep 24, 2003
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      There's no way to accurately describe what I saw, but the design was
      such that the hammock could not be twisted around itself, even
      empty. All four corners were tied off at the 4 corners of the
      hammock support making it spread out. The sides were prevented from
      closing up around the baby. The support was similar to a sawhorse,
      but the upper cross beam was actually two beams at least 12 inches
      apart. So the 4 corners of the hammock were at least 12 inches
      apart, side to side, and 24 inches apart, lengthwise. The advantages
      I saw to this over the western crib were: 1) cooler in a tropical
      climate, 2) prevented the baby from rolling over onto its stomach and
      reducing the risk of SIDS, 3) comfort - no pressure points, and 4)
      the baby could be gently rocked although the amount is severely
      limited.

      For the types of hammocks we use, I would also be concerned about
      them twisting. With these, it would have been physically impossible
      for CPSC scenario.

      Wish I had a picture of it. You would then be able to see what I
      mean.



      --- In hammockcamping@yahoogroups.com, karens62@a... wrote:
      > In a message dated 9/24/2003 6:56:29 PM Eastern Daylight Time,
      ciyd@a...
      > writes:
      >
      > > You hard core hammocking parents might consider something like
      that
      > > for your new bundles of joy :-)
      >
      > Or, you might not. The Consumer Safety Product Comission recommends
      that
      > infants not sleep on soft surfaces.
      >
      > "PROBLEM: Without spreader bars to hold the mini-hammock bed open,
      the
      > mini-hammocks can suddenly twist around children's' necks and
      strangle them. Also,
      > infants sleeping on soft bedding can become wedged in positions in
      which they
      > cannot breathe.................... CPSC also recommends that babies
      never be
      > placed on soft bedding. To prevent suffocation, babies should sleep
      in a crib on
      > a firm, flat mattress on their backs with no pillows or other soft
      bedding. "
      >
      > Just something to think about.
      >
      > Karen
      >
      >
      > http://www.cpsc.gov/CPSCPUB/PREREL/prhtml01/01500.html
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